: beginner for the 07 rr?


kjn2605
03-06-2007, 11:38 AM
I'm a 120lb (5'5'') female first-time rider, and I really like the 07 600rr but I'm worried about it being too much for me to handle the first time... although I don't know where else to go so any suggestions and information about what to look for and all would be appreciated, I'm just worried that if I go into it blind I'll end up with something I can't handle.
I'm taking the class in May and I'll be shopping soon after that, but I like having a set goal in mind...

LonelyRR
03-06-2007, 11:50 AM
I would recommend taking the class first before choosing a bike.
Your learn more about riding in the class room and will aid you in choosing the right bike for you.

RelfF2
03-06-2007, 11:56 AM
as somebody who has a blast and goes very quickly on an "outdated" used bike i can tell you that starting off with something smaller and used would be a good idea. sure, you could "handle" a brand new 600rr. but the chances are you are going to drop it a few times, and starting off with something with that much power, and something that expensive is only going to make riding and learning more stressfull then it needs to be. buy something smaller and used. an older 600, 500, or 250 depending on what you feel good sitting on, drop it a few times, work on you skills, and deside if riding is for you. then step up to some of the more advanced bikes. you'll be a better rider for it and have more fun while learning too.

maxpowers
03-06-2007, 12:02 PM
EX 500 or EX 250 would be a better first bike. I wouldn't go this big the first time. Get a few years under your belt. Trust me, those two bikes are plenty fast at the begining.

em2b96p
03-06-2007, 12:04 PM
since ur only 5'5" i would imagine you are gonna be barely able to tip toe when ur sitting on the bike. As for a first time rider, barely tall enough to get a grip when standing it up, on a brand new 600cc sportbike, and costing $9500; i would be very concerned as to you safety and am willing to state that it wont take very long before that brand new bike becomes damaged.

im not gonna tell you to get a 250 or somthing small because thats not what i did or believed in. although i can say and agree with 99% of the people here and say take the MSF at the very least. Find someone with patience to teach you, and seriously look into insurance and/or financing on a brand new fully insured sportbike before you get your hopes up..

Max Power
03-06-2007, 12:48 PM
EX 500 or EX 250 would be a better first bike. I wouldn't go this big the first time.

Plus one on those bike choices, and add the GS500 to the list...

saiyan66
03-06-2007, 12:49 PM
The Suzuki SV650 is a great starter bike and fairly inexpensive. After you take the MSF course try and pick one of those up used. They have a low seat height and plenty of power. Not to mention lots of upgrade parts to get your addiction started. Then once you have "outgrown" that, pick up a 600RR.

BiGxbOix510
03-06-2007, 01:13 PM
Wow, no leg humpers....
Take the class and take it slow.

jtown
03-06-2007, 01:17 PM
I would definitely go with a cheaper bike to start out with. My first bike was an $800 1983 Honda Shadow, which i rode for a year and resold for $500 and then from there moved on to a 600RR. So i would recommend getting something inexpensive that you know you can easily resell. That style of bike I fell is probably easier to learn on than a sport bike. My wifes first bike was a 2004 GS500. She is 5' and we shaved the seat down as much as we could and it worked out great.

impostor71
03-06-2007, 01:23 PM
After your MSF class, your objectives should be on building on the skills you learned in class and to make them instinctive when riding. Getting a hot bike should be the least of your concerns. Can you handle a 600RR? Probably. But if all things are equal, in 1 year, you'll learn more and will be a much better rider if you're on one of the beginner bikes vs a latest generation supersport bike.

I would also recommend the Ninja500, SV650, or GS500F as your first learner bike. Those bikes are very forgiving and will not scare you as you build your riding skills. If you drop them, they're not going to cost you an arm and a leg to replace the plastics. Furthermore, their power is more than enough for a beginner. You will learn much more when you're not scared that you're going to crash.

Some of us have decades of riding experience and have seen new riders come and go. I hope you take our advice seriously. We're not trying to be condescending. We're just trying to tell you how it really is. Bottom line, develop your skills as a rider. Build your experience. Then hop on a supersport bike.

Popov
03-06-2007, 01:38 PM
What they all said...

My first bike was a 1981 Suzuki GS850 which although it weighed a freaking ton, it was a good bike to learn on and it didn't really matter much if it went down. Which it did, courtesy of my brother trying to move it into the garage, we've since strictly regulated him to 4 wheels only. My dad ended up selling last year for uh... $50 bucks to a friend of his. All the guy did to it was buy a new battery and a clutch and rides the damn thing all over the place. Point being, there are plently of cheap options out there that just make more sense to learn on, not saying it can't be done on a RR... but thats a potential $10,000 mistake on a machine that has the capability to bite you in the a$$ real quick.

_Jay_
03-06-2007, 01:40 PM
Power isn't the issue you are going to have. Being only 5'-5" tall, the bike will most likely be too big for you (literally). If you got one, you'd have to spend some cash on lowering it to make it easier for you to manipulate at stops. The smaller CC bikes mentioned above (Kawi EX250 and 500) are great starter bikes. They have a 29.3" and 30.5" seat height (respectively) as opposed to a 32.3" height on the '07 RR. It'll make it a little easier for you to get your ducks on the pavement. Plus they have enough power to keep you happy and get great gas mileage (from what I hear). Everyone is right tho, being your first bike, you will most likely drop it at some point. I know some ppl never have, but odds are it will happen. Might forget to put kickstand down when u get off, lose grip or balance when rolling it around, put your foot down in a puddle of oil at a stop light...etc. You will feel much better if it happened on a used 250 than you would on an '07 600RR.

If you are dead set on a 600, go for something a little older, say a 1999-2002 600. I started out on a 2001 GSXR600 and was totally fine. It was very forgiving by todays standards, but still kept up with most of my friends newer 600's on group rides. Either way, I wish you the best of luck in whatever decision you make.

James06CBR
03-06-2007, 01:47 PM
Overall, You will know more about what you want after taking that class. I doubt the RR will be the bike for you right off. My lady will be starting on the Kawi EX500 or 250. People start all different ways. The best way is to learn the clutch on a dirt bike while riding in the dirt. The 600RR is not really a relaxing bike to try and learn on. You need to be thinking about your timing in terms of braking, signals, lights, etc. You need to be comfortable as much as possible while you are learning. I got my first sportbike last year. I've been riding enduro bikes on the street for 18 years but I am a noob to the actual sportbike. I can tell you that it takes a little getting used to and I am still learning.

SilvaRR
03-06-2007, 01:47 PM
just sat on the 07 and it is shorter than my 06. i barely flat foot my 06 and im 5'7 so if you are 5'5 and rock a nice heel (1") you should be fine. i weigh bout 145 and the 06 was my first bike ever, but ive rode before, and by the grace of God i have been fine. like the others said take the class and ride YOUR ride. oh and the 07 is so light feel like you pick it up and carry it with you. Dam i wanna trade but...

James06CBR
03-06-2007, 01:53 PM
Power isn't the issue you are going to have. Being only 5'-5" tall, the bike will most likely be too big for you (literally). If you got one, you'd have to spend some cash on lowering it to make it easier for you to manipulate at stops. The smaller CC bikes mentioned above (Kawi EX250 and 500) are great starter bikes. They have a 29.3" and 30.5" seat height (respectively) as opposed to a 32.3" height on the '07 RR. It'll make it a little easier for you to get your ducks on the pavement. Plus they have enough power to keep you happy and get great gas mileage (from what I hear). Everyone is right tho, being your first bike, you will most likely drop it at some point. I know some ppl never have, but odds are it will happen. Might forget to put kickstand down when u get off, lose grip or balance when rolling it around, put your foot down in a puddle of oil at a stop light...etc. You will feel much better if it happened on a used 250 than you would on an '07 600RR.



If you are dead set on a 600, go for something a little older, say a 1999-2002 600. I started out on a 2001 GSXR600 and was totally fine. It was very forgiving by todays standards, but still kept up with most of my friends newer 600's on group rides. Either way, I wish you the best of luck in whatever decision you make.

Wait! I'm 5'4 and 3/4th of an inch! I can touch both feet down on my 06 600RR. True, I'm only getting both balls of my feet down, but that is enough. I can put one foot up and get one whole foot down that way. My 600R enduro was taller than this bike and I did fine. Although, not the bike I'd suggest to a person who is 5'5 and never ridden before. It is something though that she can work up to and the height issue...I think she just made it like I did. No need to talk about lowering either, that f's things up.

erw43
03-06-2007, 01:56 PM
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a148/ericrwalker/pichers1.jpg

mzuleger
03-06-2007, 01:59 PM
I also recommend starting on a bike that you don't care too much about. My first bike was a 92 CBR F2, it was a salvage bike and it already had a couple scrathes on it so when I tipped it I wasn't too mad at myself. Most new riders will tip thier first bike at some point.

Mas.

sheetone
03-06-2007, 03:26 PM
c'mon guys...if this was a dude posting up (which it could be, who knows), you'd all be ripping him a new one..

ur 5'5" 120 and never rode a bike and are thinking about the 07 600rr? yeah, good luck with that. take the msf course and talk to the instructors about what would be a good fit. they will steer you in the appropriate direction. personally, i would recommened the kawi 250 or 500.

you guys are forgetting that a 120 lb chick is nowhere near as strong as a 120 lb guy. it's not sexism, it's science.

erw43
03-06-2007, 03:36 PM
you guys are forgetting that a 120 lb chick is nowhere near as strong as a 120 lb guy. it's not sexism, it's science.


She might be on the juice!!!

Popov
03-06-2007, 03:46 PM
http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k24/Popov_600RR/juice.jpg

kjn2605
03-06-2007, 04:55 PM
Thanks for the suggestions; I'll definitely take them into consideration. A lot of my friends are riders but they're all young and they want me to get the fastest bike I can find so I can keep up with them(which isn't really a concern with me, I'll learn on my own time)so I wanted opinions of people who were more... objective. So thank you so much!

Also, I know I can touch both feet on an 06 gixxer and kind of pedal it around without a problem, and I can have my bike lowered if I need to free of charge, my concern was really about weight and if I was big enough to control a bike more than touch my feet to the ground...

I'm going down today to sit on a few and see how I feel, I'll definitely check out all of your suggestions. Thanks! And any more suggestions are welcome...

junk
03-06-2007, 05:13 PM
I'm 5'7" and let me tell you, it's an absolute pain if you park in the wrong place. If you park, nose in, in a space that has a slight decline, walking it back sucks. I can almost get both feet flat, but not quite. I've been seen walking next to my bike pulling it back up a hill. Not a fun feeling, because it's not so well balanced when you're doing that. I'd go with something with a smaller seat height, if not a slower bike to begin with altogether.

caball88
03-06-2007, 05:18 PM
there is a thread about 600rr(06 model) in the general discussion as a first bike and there are some good points made there so i wouldn't duplicate it. but people made too big a deal out of the both feet touching the ground. yes it makes you feel more comfortable when you are stationary but in reality all you need is one foot down when stopped. and when you are moving you better not have either foot down. lowering the bike will change the ride characteristics and is generally not recommended. as for you weight(120) it is fairly light and there has been complaints about the rear suspension being too stiff even at the lightest setting. also don't let your friends pressure you into getting the fastest thing on 2 wheels. if they care about your safety they wouldn't.

RelfF2
03-06-2007, 05:35 PM
A lot of my friends are riders but they're all young and they want me to get the fastest bike I can find so I can keep up with them

this is alittle scary. sounds like some more mature riding buddies would be a good first mod for your new bike. ;)

ride safe.

_Jay_
03-06-2007, 05:39 PM
this is alittle scary. sounds like some more mature riding buddies would be a good first mod for your new bike. ;)

ride safe.


........+1

H0LLYW00D
03-06-2007, 06:16 PM
dont lower your bike is changes its handling characterisitcs and its ground clearance, it would be like shortining the wings on a plane and wondering why it doesnt fly and preform like it should. my 2cents as an instructor in my city

James06CBR
03-06-2007, 06:20 PM
there is a thread about 600rr(06 model) in the general discussion as a first bike and there are some good points made there so i wouldn't duplicate it. but people made too big a deal out of the both feet touching the ground. yes it makes you feel more comfortable when you are stationary but in reality all you need is one foot down when stopped. and when you are moving you better not have either foot down. lowering the bike will change the ride characteristics and is generally not recommended. as for you weight(120) it is fairly light and there has been complaints about the rear suspension being too stiff even at the lightest setting. also don't let your friends pressure you into getting the fastest thing on 2 wheels. if they care about your safety they wouldn't.

Yep, I'm 124lbs and the rear is too stiff. All I need is to swap out that rear shock I guess. It's an easy fix really...not worth making it a decision breaker or maker. I think she should look for a low miles bike that is a few years old and more her speed/skill level, she has no need for the 07 anyway. The 07 is more money and we haven't seen yet what the first run flaws are going to be.

erw43
03-06-2007, 06:28 PM
this is alittle scary. sounds like some more mature riding buddies would be a good first mod for your new bike. ;)

ride safe.

+100000000

If you value your life, don't listen to your friends.

RelfF2
03-06-2007, 06:58 PM
just one more thing, and that's to reitterate the "fun-factor" side of my suggestion. alot of people think that if you get a smaller bike it won't be as fast and thus not as fun. but it's actually the opposite. on a smaller bike you gain more confidence, your skills improve, and pretty soon you're flogging the thing having a great time. only after this point is it more fun to get a faster bike. being a new rider on a bike that's much better then you only makes the ride more stressfull and difficult. not only is the fear and possiblity of getting spit on your head greatly increased, but the ramifcations of such an event are greater as well.

impostor71
03-06-2007, 07:45 PM
A couple of things I want to touch on.

my concern was really about weight and if I was big enough to control a bike
Riding a motorcycle isn't so much about weight as it is about technique, skills, instinct, and a little bit of luck. You can weigh a whole 90lbs and can still ride a 1000cc litre bike. Look at the MotoGP racers. And vice versa. Having a light bike doesn't always mean you can control it. Staying alive on a bike isn't so much about controlling the bike. It's more about controlling yourself. (I'm having a zen moment)

I can touch both feet on an 06 gixxer
The Gixxer600 is a tad lower than the 07 600RR. A friend of mine just picked one up Sunday and I was there helping him decide on a new 600. While being able to touch the ground with both feet is not an issue with stopping and riding, it is a HUGE issue when you need to move the bike around on less than ideal surfaces that is slippery, with sand, water, oil, or with slight elevation. Lose your footing and that puppy's going down.

A lot of my friends are riders but they're all young and they want me to get the fastest bike I can find so I can keep up with them
Your riding buddies aren't looking out for your best interest. From your profile, you're 19 and your friends are "all young". I'm curious how much younger are they and what are they riding? What kind of riding are they doing?

Btw, the OEM stubby pipe on the Gixxer 600 has a nice throaty growl, almost like aftermarket. I'm like it!

ccc1997
03-06-2007, 09:57 PM
KJN2605,

How did the 07 CBR600RR fit & feel? What do you think you will buy? Anybody think of getting a power commander and putting on the bike to retard the power until she's ready for full-throttle? This is similar in fashion to what is done at the factory on the new GSX-R1000 with it's power switch.

GSX-R 1000 '07 offers a gadget that, without a doubt, will soon be imitated by other manufacturers, the S-MDS; that is, Suzuki's Mode Drive Selector, which offers the rider a choice of three distinct levels of power. A great, simple, and very practical system of having three bikes in one. In a control box located on the right side, after pressing a button, for two seconds, we can move through the A-B-C programs that render three different power curve modes: A, the one that always functions as the default when you start your bike, accesses the full power mode; that is, without restrictions. B turns in all the maximum power, but with less power for low and medium revolutions, and C reduces power throughout, just in case you're faced with adverse conditions (such as wet weather) . . . or you're having a bad day.


http://www.motorcycledaily.com/19february07_2007suzuki_gsxr1000.htm

TOMIMOTO
03-06-2007, 11:34 PM
A lot of my friends are riders but they're all young and they want me to get the fastest bike I can find so I can keep up with them.

Trying to keep up with "more experienced riders" (if you can even call those toolbags that) is the easiest way to get hurt or dead.

Hondagurl
03-06-2007, 11:35 PM
I am roughly 135 lbs and I'm 5'5 as well. I ride a 2005 RR and I am on my tippy toes. Difference with me is that I've been riding for 4 years so I know how to handle and manover the bike. I hate being short because I have a hard time backing up my bike. (which can propose a problem with balancing if you are a first time rider).

I personally think that you're better off with getting
a) a smaller bike to learn on or
b) a used/older bike

Trust me.....if you get a brand new 2007, you are going to cry when you drop it the first time. My first bike was a 2001 F4i and the first time I dropped it, I was really upset. I think I dropped that bike 4 times but at least it was a used bike and I only paid $7000 for it. (rather than $13,000). Everyone seems to think that they won't drop their bike but you never know. Slipping on gravel, manovering in slow speeds, backing it out of the garage etc. I bought my 2005 brand new, straight out from the crate and the first time I rode it, I was nervous as hell because I didn't want to scratch it or even worse....drop it. I was barely on my tippy toes and I was contemplating about getting it lowered but I didn't. Like what I said before, I've been riding for 4 years and I did my share of dropping bikes. There is no harm in riding an EX 500 for the first year, get some experience and then buying yourself a nice, new shiny bike.

Happy riding!

OveRReV
03-06-2007, 11:59 PM
i agree with everybody here & you should take an MSF course & start on a smaller displacement bike, wish you guys had a CB400 Super Four, very versatile bike & popular in Japan & the Philippines, it's probably one of the best bikes to learn on.

http://world.honda.com/Tokyo2003/motor/lineup/cb/cb400sf/garally/picture02/image/picture.jpg

http://world.honda.com/Tokyo2003/motor/lineup/cb/cb400sf/garally/picture01/image/picture.jpg

gee
03-07-2007, 12:05 AM
that is one heavy beasty Overrev....

get a 250 sister, you will not regret it in the long run, you will drop your first bike, and your second possible all of them, but the first for sure, ride all summer on the toy bike and then if you feel confident after that grab that 07RR and go nuts.... enjoy and welcome to the club

TribalCBR06
03-07-2007, 02:09 AM
you guys are forgetting that a 120 lb chick is nowhere near as strong as a 120 lb guy. it's not sexism, it's science.

true but i know a chick who is 5'1 and about 120lbs and rides a lowered 06Gixxer600. yes, the 07RR would be kinda hard to start on, but i always give people the benefit of the doubt especially she's taking the MSF course so she's def taking the right steps. i would recommend against it also but do what u want. sit on the 07RR and see how it feels. i'm sure you'll have to lower it. if possible maybe practice on a less powerful bike or a friend's 600 (im sure u have some friends who'll let u practice on they're bikes). good luck and be safe.

makko327
03-07-2007, 02:50 AM
+1000 sheetone
c'mon guys...if this was a dude posting up (which it could be, who knows), you'd all be ripping him a new one..

ur 5'5" 120 and never rode a bike and are thinking about the 07 600rr? yeah, good luck with that. take the msf course and talk to the instructors about what would be a good fit. they will steer you in the appropriate direction. personally, i would recommened the kawi 250 or 500.

you guys are forgetting that a 120 lb chick is nowhere near as strong as a 120 lb guy. it's not sexism, it's science.

xerces
03-07-2007, 08:49 AM
Hey everyone, first post here. I've been lurking for a few days now trying to research the 07 as I debate downsizing from my 05 GSX-R1000. I happened upon this thread and felt I had some info to pass on.

My wife is 5'6" and about 120 as well. I finally talked her into getting her own bike two years back. We went to all the dealers and brands and had her sit on the "beginner" bikes. At her height, none of the Japanese bikes allowed her to flat foot and feel comfortable. Then we ran across the Ducati Monster 620. She instantly feel in love with the looks of the bike and once we went to our dealer, she found that she could also flat foot on it too. Those crazy Italians actually designed this bike with a woman in mind.

So, we picked it up and she rode the snot out of it. Its not a very powerfull bike by only putting out around 50hp but it was smooth and sounded great. Has stock Brembo brakes, hydraulic slipper clutch and great looks with very easy clutch pull (almost like a dirt bike). She always felt in control and it never got away from her. Her and I both highly recommend any first time woman look into a used 620 or into the bike they replaced it with, the new 695. Hit up ducatimonster.org if you want to find a good deal on one.

Hope that helps?

erw43
03-07-2007, 08:54 AM
Xerces,

I think downsizing to a 07 CBR600RR would be a good upgrade.

impostor71
03-07-2007, 02:01 PM
I've known a few ladies that started on the Monster and Buel FireBolt(?). Those bikes are not as high and they feel very confident when peddling it back and forth.

Ballz
03-07-2007, 04:58 PM
Buell Blast is the place to start. Maybe a ninja 250, or even 500. If you are the kind of person that would get sick of a starter bike quickly... I suggest you buy a cheap one and get rid of it once you learn how to ride. Or, if you must... go with a Ninja 650, or Suzuki SV 650.... but you said you are a small person, so even that might be a little much. If you get the RR "because your friends are all young and they want you to keep up" then chances are, you won't be riding long. Thats just my 2 cents worth.
My cousin sort of had that same attitude, but he doesn't ride anymore...
Because he lost his leg in a bike crash.

TOMIMOTO
03-07-2007, 05:48 PM
I would start with a Kawasaki Ninja 500 or a Suzuki GS500. GS500's below year 2004 were naked bikes so you don't have to worry about rouining fairings.

I started on a Suzuki GS500. It was a fun bike. Top speed was like 115 if that matters to you. It definately helped develope my skills for when I moved up to the RR.

A Ninja 250 would get boring too fast. Yah it's good to hone your skills, but Mack Trucks can beat that thing off the line and with top speed. It's so slow it's not really worth it I think. I personally think that being that slow it's also dangerous since it will be harder to get out of stupid people's ways.

ME2
03-07-2007, 07:52 PM
Height, weight, and gender aside...

Some very important comments have been made here, and I think you need to consider them with some serious thought.

First of all, your friends want you to get a fast bike... I really hope you let this sink in, those friends are a new rider's worst nightmare. DO NOT expect to buy a bike and be able to ride anything but parking lots for a week or two. I anticipate that it will be quite a while before you are even comfortable with moderate traffic. Trying to learn with "experienced" riders who want you to go fast is a sure ticket to the hospital. Don't kid yourself here, an '07 600rr will throw you off the seat with an accidental blip of the throttle. With your lack of experience, combined with trying to keep up... it's only a matter of time.

Another very important point...
With your experience level, there is NOTHING you can do on an '07, that you can't do on a '97. A wide open crack of the throttle on a new bike WILL be too much to handle, but you MAY be able to control a '97. Once you get to the point that you feel more power is needed, trade in for the new bike. It will take under a week to trade for a new bike... the dealerships will never have a shortage of them.

I'm on my 5th bike now, and my riding is very seasonal here in ND. Believe me when I tell you that I definitely need to take it slow every spring. Even with my experience, these new bikes are scary fast when you haven't been riding for a while... or at all in your case.

None of us here are trying to lecture you, and ultimately the decision is yours to make. However, please spend some time considering all of these comments... in my honest opinion, you've got a lot to learn before riding ANY bike with those friends of yours... much less the '07.

xerces
03-07-2007, 08:39 PM
Xerces,

I think downsizing to a 07 CBR600RR would be a good upgrade.

HAHAHAHA!!! I would love to find a way to keep my current ride and add the RR! ;) Although I've also got my eye on the 07 Gixxer 1K.

I may not even do anything. I've got some decent pocket change into my current bike, to include a PCIII, Scorpion pipe, Vortex resets, CRG gold shorty levers with the Super Sport clutch perch, Elka triple adjustment shock, and Galfer SS brake lines to name the bigger ticket items.. I think I'd go into a serious state of depression if I had to let it all go. But man, does the new RR look hot or what?!?!?!

kottonmouth
03-07-2007, 10:01 PM
take the course then buy a used bike

Hondagurl
03-07-2007, 11:03 PM
Xerces,

I think downsizing to a 07 CBR600RR would be a good upgrade.

I agree! I know a few people who bought a 1000 for their first bike and then they rode a 600 and was very surprised. They preferred it over their 1000.

TwistyB*tch
03-08-2007, 12:52 AM
I have been riding for a bit still a noob but I started smaller and I couldn't belive my ears when I was at a motorcycle show in Toronto and a Honda sales guy was trying to convince me it was a great bike to learn on . Anyway I thought that was a bit irresponsible but whatever , I have some experiance and the msf course behind me and I just bought one myself . I am 5' 6 and a half and I am tip toed but I am taking my time with her . Realisticly you could start out on it , you will bang it up . These guy's know what they are talking about and there advice is solid

xerces
03-08-2007, 08:27 AM
I agree! I know a few people who bought a 1000 for their first bike and then they rode a 600 and was very surprised. They preferred it over their 1000.

Well, the gixxer isn't my first bike but the desire to downsize is mostly due to wanting some more nimbleness and more controlability, especially for my "home" track of JenningsGP in north Florida. Its only a 1.9 mile track with a lot of tight turns with a top speed of maybe 145 if you are good. The big gix is just overkill for it. I test rode the Daytona 675 last fall and was extremely impressed with its light weight and confidence inspiring handling. I can only assume the new RR will be all that or more with the "grunt" I'm looking for.

ccc1997
03-08-2007, 04:52 PM
grunt, grunt...get some!

GA600rrGuy
03-08-2007, 05:07 PM
yeah, get a scratched up ninja 250 and ride it for a year and then get a new bike next year. i would hate to see you tip over a brand new 600rr the day you buy it.

aesp93
03-08-2007, 11:26 PM
Now before I say anything please know that I am in the same situation (almost).

I'm a guy that stands 5 2" at best with an inseam of 25-27" and 120 lbs. I have never ridden before and looking to take my class next month.

Ok, so I believe that your biggest problem is your friends (sorry). Getting a bike just because they want you to ride the fastest bike is a terrible idea. Actually, I believe that they just want to ride or buy it from you (It's a great bike).

As for you handling the weight, power, or height. I agree with the idea that it is more about skill. I live in Hawaii and I always see girls shorter and lighter than me riding 1000cc bikes. Though here we usually cut the seat before even thinking of lowering the bike.

Everyone will probably suggest a 250cc used bike and for the most part I think they are right. Still, get the bike you want even if its the 2007 cbr 600rr. Yes, you and I most likely drop the bike. I think there's worse things than scratching your new bike. Such as crashing it and hurting yourself and others.

I suggest you learn as much as you can before the test. See if you can flat foot or at least tripod the bike. Read a few books check out Amazon on how to ride a bike and check out the local Borders or libary. Take the class and see how you do on a 250cc bike. Lastly, once you get your permit or licence test drive as many bikes as you can. Then ask your friends if you can learn on their bikes. It will not be the same bike and you will have to forget all that muscle memory, but at least it will give you some riding time.

I'm going to do all this and more. I have a lot of people here that want to teach me to ride, but they all suggest going slow and even learning on their 600cc bikes for a bit. I plan on getting the cbr 600rr around Fall or the end of the year. This allows me to time to get a huge down payment. I mean really the insurance a lone will be a ton (I don't have the best driving record).

Yes, a lot of people will disagree with starting on a 600cc, but its your life and your bike. Get what you want, but use your head and be patient. I think it will be a least 3 months before I go out in to anything like real traffic. I may be wrong somewhere in this post, but its just a suggestion.

Have fun and be safe.

aesp93
03-08-2007, 11:26 PM
Now before I say anything please know that I am in the same situation (almost).

I'm a guy that stands 5 2" at best with an inseam of 25-27" and 120 lbs. I have never ridden before and looking to take my class next month.

Ok, so I believe that your biggest problem is your friends (sorry). Getting a bike just because they want you to ride the fastest bike is a terrible idea. Actually, I believe that they just want to ride or buy it from you (It's a great bike).

As for you handling the weight, power, or height. I agree with the idea that it is more about skill. I live in Hawaii and I always see girls shorter and lighter than me riding 1000cc bikes. Though here we usually cut the seat before even thinking of lowering the bike.

Everyone will probably suggest a 250cc used bike and for the most part I think they are right. Still, get the bike you want even if its the 2007 cbr 600rr. Yes, you and I most likely drop the bike. I think there's worse things than scratching your new bike. Such as crashing it and hurting yourself and others.

I suggest you learn as much as you can before the test or you buy the bike. See if you can flat foot or at least tripod the bike. Read a few books check out Amazon on how to ride a bike and check out the local Borders or libary. Take the class and see how you do on a 250cc bike. Lastly, once you get your permit or licence test drive as many bikes as you can. Then ask your friends if you can learn on their bikes. It will not be the same bike and you will have to forget all that muscle memory, but at least it will give you some riding time.

I'm going to do all this and more. I have a lot of people here that want to teach me to ride, but they all suggest going slow and even learning on their 600cc bikes for a bit. I plan on getting the cbr 600rr around Fall or the end of the year. This allows me to time to get a huge down payment. I mean really the insurance a lone will be a ton (I don't have the best driving record).

Yes, a lot of people will disagree with starting on a 600cc, but its your life and your bike. Get what you want, but use your head and be patient. I think it will be a least 3 months before I go out in to anything like real traffic. I may be wrong somewhere in this post, but its just a suggestion.

P.S. Gear up each and every time. Your gear not theirs.
Have fun and be safe.

glassmw
03-11-2007, 11:21 PM
Just FYI,

Overall height isn't really the issue about being able to reach the ground, the inseam (leg length) is what people need to worry about. Two people with a 3" height difference can very easily have the same inseam length...

TribalCBR06
03-12-2007, 12:20 AM
amen aesp93. ur def on the right track. msf ++++ gear and lots of practice. i've seen girls that are 5ft who can ride a 600 just fine, (lowered bike of course) as long as u don't mind tippy toeing and dropping ur bike a couple of times.

sooperman12
03-12-2007, 10:35 AM
Dropping it is a long forgone conclusion. You WILL drop the bike. It's not a question of "if", it's a question of "when". And let me tell you, dropping a used bike hurts less than dropping a new one. I dropped my Honda Nighthawk 250. Thankfully didn't drop the Ducati. And now, I have an RR, which I dropped (walking it, not riding), dang it. But the point is, you'll drop it. Thankfully, none of the bikes I had were new and the pain was short-lived. But on the other side of the token, I DO believe an RR is too much for a newbie to handle. Start with an EX-500 or an older model 600 (F3, F4, or even F4i). The power delivery is subtler and throttle easier to modulate. Honda's are and will always be user friendly. But still, the lower seating position of the F-series will be more comfortable as well as the ergos. You'll enjoy learning on it more. Explore the limits of a smaller bike will help you when you graduate to a larger cc bike.

Oh, one more thing, save your money and invest in gear. Doesn't do much if you can't ride a bike because you didn't save yourself by the gear you wear. Plus, lowering causes all sorts of problems and I don't recommend it if you aren't aware of how to properly accommodate such an action. Proper suspension set up is key to safe riding, IMO. Some people just lower the rear and think that's fine. It's not. Do you know how much to compensate in the front by dropping the forks?

sooperman12
03-12-2007, 10:44 AM
I have been riding for a bit still a noob but I started smaller and I couldn't belive my ears when I was at a motorcycle show in Toronto and a Honda sales guy was trying to convince me it was a great bike to learn on . Anyway I thought that was a bit irresponsible but whatever , I have some experiance and the msf course behind me and I just bought one myself . I am 5' 6 and a half and I am tip toed but I am taking my time with her . Realisticly you could start out on it , you will bang it up . These guy's know what they are talking about and there advice is solid

Now how come you haven't posted up more? Listen to Twist. She knows what she's talking about. Exploring the limits on a smaller bike will teach you SO MUCH about how to ride larger bikes. I can't believe people take this little known fact for granted. When it comes down to it, it comes down to ego and pride. "I don't wanna look like a gump on a 250." Well, who looks more like a gump: Someone who's taking the time to learn how to ride properly? Or, the noob on a powerful 600 in a ditch?

kjn2605
03-12-2007, 05:21 PM
Hey! thanks for the answers, I've been away...
Anyway yea, my boyfriend's really supportive of me choosing the bike that's right for me... I actually kind of like the kawi zzr 600; a friend back home let me ride it *its older* and I did just fine, and he's about 3-4 inches shorter than me as well but like you said height isn't an issue. So whether I buy one used or a new one I haven't decided, but I sat on it and really thought it was comfortable/good, etc.
I haven't made up my mind yet because all the places I've been to haven't carried anything under 600, but new or used, and this is probably blasphemy but... I don't really care if I drop my first bike whether its used, new, whatever. Because I know it'll happen.
And as for my friends.... yeah. Don't worry, I've wanted a bike for 5 years and this is MY choice not theirs, I fell in love with a bike that I probably can't handle I wasn't pushed by them or anything. Hah they really didn't have a say in the matter and they knew it.
And I really don't think I could go as small as a 250, honestly I'd be bored in a week...
Annddd.... I can't remember the name *sorry* but the chick that posted about starting small and walking by the honda guy saying it's a good bike to start on.... yeah that's about how I started getting interested in it. But you all are right, I mean I haven't been on a bike for more than 15 minutes alone so I should definitely get comfortable riding before I get a supersport. :o)

kjn2605
03-12-2007, 05:23 PM
Oh sorry, "he's about 3-4 inches shorter than me as well but like you said height isn't an issue. " that refers to the statement about inseam and being able to be comfortable on the bike. It was more a reference to his height than mine...

TribalCBR06
03-12-2007, 11:19 PM
Hey! thanks for the answers, I've been away...
Anyway yea, my boyfriend's really supportive of me choosing the bike that's right for me... I actually kind of like the kawi zzr 600; a friend back home let me ride it *its older* and I did just fine, and he's about 3-4 inches shorter than me as well but like you said height isn't an issue. So whether I buy one used or a new one I haven't decided, but I sat on it and really thought it was comfortable/good, etc.
I haven't made up my mind yet because all the places I've been to haven't carried anything under 600, but new or used, and this is probably blasphemy but... I don't really care if I drop my first bike whether its used, new, whatever. Because I know it'll happen.
And as for my friends.... yeah. Don't worry, I've wanted a bike for 5 years and this is MY choice not theirs, I fell in love with a bike that I probably can't handle I wasn't pushed by them or anything. Hah they really didn't have a say in the matter and they knew it.
And I really don't think I could go as small as a 250, honestly I'd be bored in a week...
Annddd.... I can't remember the name *sorry* but the chick that posted about starting small and walking by the honda guy saying it's a good bike to start on.... yeah that's about how I started getting interested in it. But you all are right, I mean I haven't been on a bike for more than 15 minutes alone so I should definitely get comfortable riding before I get a supersport. :o)

the kawi zzr is a great bike. a friend of mine who's a new rider has one and he's very comfortable in it. and it doesn't matter what bike u have as a new rider, its true that its a matter of "when" u drop it, not "if". i myself haved dropped the preciuos RR but i have sliders which saved the fairings!
keep us posted Kjn2605 of whatever bike u get.

spal2ks
03-16-2007, 11:41 PM
i took the class before ever riding or really deciding on a bike.. my first bike which ive had fora few months now is a 1988 Honda Hawk GT its a 650 (50 some horses and torque..)but its faster than my 06 wrx so im not complaining, its a blast in the corners and learning to ride couldnt be better. im yet to lay the bike down (knock on wood) and im now riding my dads vfr, which is an 800 and its very fast and i love it, again im 6 1 175 ... after riding the vfr so much now the hawk doesnt really do it anymore so im glad i enjoyed that bike first before i was blinded by speed:-) now i plan on getting an 07 600rr as soon as a can work up some funds now that i feel very comfortable riding(not overconfident..) but good luck learning, dont jump on a race bike for your first ride.... start small like you would with anything youre planning to learn.

07 600rr
03-17-2007, 12:00 AM
I agree that the zzr 600 is an excellent bike to learn on. I have one (an 05) sitting in the garage right beside my new 600rr. I think the 07 600rr is too much for a first time rider. Get something a little heavier and slower to learn on. Biggest thing is take your time, and don't get overconfident. As soon as you do thats the time your gonna go down. And lastly drive defensively, you never know when someone is going to pull out of the next driveway.

Upirons
03-17-2007, 02:47 AM
When I was working in the USA last year I had the chance of taking the MSF course. Let me tell you that it is the best thing that you can do before even thinking about buying a motorcycle. The MSF course that I have taken had different style of bikes such as the Ninja 250, scooters and cruiser-like bikes. That's where I tested out the Ninja 250 and it is an excellent starter bike with excellent resale value.

You can buy a cheaper used bike and put more money into top notch protective gear. Then when you are confident enough then you can move up to a bigger bike. Whatever your decision, never skimp on protective gear.

P.S. Something me and my friends who ride baggers always emphasize is "Ride at your own pace!"

Virgil
03-17-2007, 06:34 PM
Suzuki GS500, Kawasaki 500 or 250, Buell Blast (500cc single), and the Suzuki SV650 are all EXCELLENT CHOICES FOR A BEGINNER BIKE. Consider that the CBR600RR 2007 wieghs 412 lbs wet and makes 110 hp to the rear wheel. You need to learn the basics without having to worry about controlling a machine that isn't made for beginners. Get something smaller/lighter that is consequantially going to be MORE FUN! There is no fun in fearing a bike, especially your first on. You will enjoy it more if you can live and learn instead of living and learning in fear. Don't listen to the "respect the power" because its not the only thing thats going to potentially bind you up. Powerful brakes, steep suspension geometry, and twitchy handling all can contribute to it, not to mention a right hand that can potentially make your day a bad one. This is not to scare u, just to give u fair warning.

Your first bike is not your last, so take it slow, learn and gain confidence on a smaller bike then step up. I did! After i bought my 05 I KNEW that it was to much bike for a beginner, although i am still getting used the the high RPM's of the bike seeing as I am used to riding at 6-9k (SV650 was my first bike).

Jim Moore
03-18-2007, 09:11 AM
You may want to see how comfortable you are on a bike when you take the MSF class. That may influence you decision one way or another. We had a girl in the class a few months ago who announced at the outset that she really wanted a Hayabusa, but she was going to "settle" for a GSXR-750, because that was what she could afford. Well, in short, she was terrible. She couldn't start, couldn't turn ,couldn't stop, failed the test, blamed us, and stomped off the range saying that she was gonna get a GSXR anyway. "Good luck ma'am, and don't let the door hit you in the ass on the way out."

If you ace the test and feel really confident on the bike, you might want to try an SV-650 or something similar. If you barely scrape by and don't feel comfortable after two days on the bike, I'd recommend something smaller.

Jim Moore

OveRReV
03-18-2007, 12:35 PM
You may want to see how comfortable you are on a bike when you take the MSF class. That may influence you decision one way or another. We had a girl in the class a few months ago who announced at the outset that she really wanted a Hayabusa, but she was going to "settle" for a GSXR-750, because that was what she could afford. Well, in short, she was terrible. She couldn't start, couldn't turn ,couldn't stop, failed the test, blamed us, and stomped off the range saying that she was gonna get a GSXR anyway. "Good luck ma'am, and don't let the door hit you in the ass on the way out."



bwahahahahhaha!!! :icon_lol:

ain't she a class act. :biggrin:

down1up2gone
03-18-2007, 12:45 PM
I have a 600rr and I want a 1000 just for shear power, but I am sure the 600 probably handles a little better. I started with a 600rr and hope to upgrade but Im holding out

NC07RR
04-05-2007, 01:38 AM
Buy it, you'll love it!

NC07RR
04-05-2007, 01:39 AM
Hey Girl, I'm a guy 5'6" 125lbs and have no problem with my 07. I've had a 500 Interceptor & a Yamaha FZ750 before. But the 07 600RR is by far the sweetest handling bike I've ridden. It's so easy to ride, it's like riding a 100HP bicycle. You'll love it!!!! I promise!!!! And it really hauls ass with little people like us on it.

runamok27
04-05-2007, 05:30 PM
If you ace the test and feel really confident on the bike, you might want to try an SV-650 or something similar. If you barely scrape by and don't feel comfortable after two days on the bike, I'd recommend something smaller.

Jim Moore

I always find these quotes funny. The MSF course, while important to start, does not mean you can ride a bike. After you have completed the MSF course, whether you ace it or not, you still cannot ride worth a ****. You now have some basic information about how to ride a bike, that is all. It is up to you to take that information and start to learn how to ride a bike.

On another note, these threads always leave out one good reason not to buy a new state of the art sportbike as a first bike. They are expensive! People pick up motorcycling everyday, a lot of them buy a bike and then quit riding shortly thereafter for whatever reason. $10,000+ to find out if you will even like something is ridiculous and, excuse me, STUPID. I know a lot of people who own motorcycles but only a few of them love to ride. Motorcycling is a passion (not a temporary speed jones) that you will not know you possess until you have been riding for a while. Although, I must admit, I appreciate all of the hardly used bikes on the used bike market that newbie quitters are selling at cut rate prices.

Andrewbox
04-05-2007, 05:58 PM
I don't think cycle dealers should be able to sell bikes to people with out taking the course. But at the same time taking the course doesn't make you a motoGP expert.

rb98
06-09-2007, 04:38 PM
at 5.5, female, and a new rider, the only thing waiting for you getting an RR as your first bike is a really fast trip to the morgue.
sorry, but that's the odds.
buy a vespa, darlin'.
cheers.
rb.

Damon Kay
06-09-2007, 05:45 PM
Take the MSF class before any big decisions. And get some good gear too.

ChemiKaze
06-10-2007, 09:42 PM
Before, you get your bike... what are you going to use it for? Riding on the streets or the canyons or the track? If you ride on the street, then you'd want something easy... a carb bike like SV or EX250 or 500 is fine.. If you ride on the track or if you ride aggressively in the canyons, then a fuel injected bike with tuned throttle control is important. I rode an EX250 then got a used 03 and now a used 07 and I personally don't think that the EX250 was a very good bike because the model hasn't changed since the 80s... so there is less safety measures on it.. I crashed on that EX250 maybe 4 times before I gave it up... the CBRs that I have after that was a dream.. handling is great on the 03 but the 07 blows it all away.... I never crashed out on those bikes.. I can run off track when I push it on the track, but never crashed it..

It is okay if you take a class.. but the lessons you learn in there are very basic... and you need more than a MSF course to get you to ride better..