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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Ever since I got my bike I’ve wanted to retrofit the lights. The asymmetry of the low beam only being on one side annoyed my OCD side and I loved how a set of projectors could make the 600RR headlights look like a pair of angry eyes. While at university I never had the time and money to undertake the project to the standard I wanted but as a graduate it is a different story and this is a writeup of the process that I used while putting my engineering degree to good use.

Despite there being kits available for the 600RR, I felt that I wanted to use a particular set of top end components for various reasons. I dislike the method of mounting a projector by a single point at the back of the bowl and felt that bolting it in would be more secure and eliminate the need to manually align the cutoff. I wanted to use LED halos as they are brighter and more durable while also not requiring inverters which would need to be hidden behind fairings. I also didn’t want to add any aftermarket switches to my bike.

Here is a before shot of the bike on the day I bought it.


Parts that I used in my retrofit:
- Morimoto MiniH1 6.0 projectors.
- Mini Gatling Shrouds.
- White TRS xBALED halos.
- 5000K XB35 bulbs.
- TRS dual H7 sportbike harness.
- VW headlight relay P/N: 111-941-583.
- Laser cut mounting brackets.
- M4 nuts, bolts and washers.
The first thing I wanted to do was to flush mount the angel eyes in the projector shrouds. To do this, I enlarged the opening of the shroud to suit with a dremel and round file to tidy up.

(Left is original, right is modified.)

I then filed in a notch for the angel eye wiring and rubbed back, primed and sprayed the shrouds satin black.


I used Blu Tack to hold the angel eyes in place before using epoxy to attach them to the shroud. It is important to use high temp epoxy so that the heat from the HID bulbs doesn’t melt it.



You can also see 4 places inside the shroud where I have dremelled a little material out. This is to make room for some bolt heads. I decided that I would replace the bolts that held the lens of the projector to the bowl with longer ones that could be used for attaching the projector to the mounting plate too. The heads of my replacement bolts were slightly larger than the original ones though which necessitated the grinding of the shrouds.


In the quest for making the whole process as bolt together as possible, I spent quite a bit of time designing an aluminium mounting bracket which could be laser cut and powdercoated. I used black fasteners which have shown up gold in this photo.


When I mounted everything up for a test fit I was disappointed to notice that I could still see the bolts attaching the projector to the bracket under the shroud. To fix this I got some PVC pipe and made up a ring to extend the shroud. This was then also painted.


Test fitting now things looked much neater. I should note that I heatshrinked all of the wires black later on.

 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)


You may have noticed in the second photo above that I have enlarged an opening between the headlight housings somewhat with my dremel. I also removed some material from the rear of the housing.
Before:


After:


This gave me room to mount the fairly porky TRS ballasts in the space created. They are fairly snug just sitting there but I added Velcro tape to make sure they stayed put.


The stock dust covers needed a small trim to allow them to work with the seal attached to the bulb wiring.


The wires aren’t yet wrapped up in this photo so it is easier to see what is what.


I wired the angel eyes (red and white wires) into the stock parking light wiring.


Since cutting stock harnesses makes me cringe I simply depinned the stock bulb connectors and used spade terminals and heatshrink to attach the aftermarket harness. I like to leave everything so that it can be easily reverted to stock should the need ever arise.


As far as wiring on the bike, I ran the positive wire up through the rubber grommet into the fuse box which required a very minor lengthening of the wire.


And threaded the negatives through the subframe alongside the battery negative wires.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The harness then follows the factory routing.


The relay block is safely tucked under the cluster using an OEM screw.


And the bulk of the harness is zip tied to the fairing stay making sure to keep out of the way of the fork movement.


Which leaves a nice neat finish.


As I mentioned earlier I didn’t want to add any aftermarket switches to the bike. Australian 600RRs have a momentary button on the handlebars for flashing the high beams.


Since this is not a feature that I’ve ever needed to use, I decided that I would repurpose the button to control turning on and off the HIDs. This means that I am able to control the low beams as you would when driving a car. The halos are on all the time and being xBALED are plenty bright enough to be used as DRLs and the low beams only need to be turned on at night.

To convert the momentary pulse from the pass switch into an on/off signal I bought a VW headlight relay P/N 111-941-583 which is a latching relay. Basically, when terminal S is given a ground pulse, a powered output is swapped between terminals 56a and 56b. By attaching the ballast trigger line to one of the outputs, the swap turns the system on or off. A possible variation here could be to attach the halos to the other output so that they turn off when the HIDs are on and vice versa.

Unfortunately the pass switch is wired into the high beam circuit so OEM wires had to be cut here. I ran two new wires up the rubber conduit to the switch and soldered everything in. One wire went to the factory ground point on the side of the frame and one went to terminal S on the relay.


Although the relay is bulky, it still fits nicely under the ram air tube cover.


I’m extremely happy with the finished product. I think it looks mean.


And I’m still amazed at just how bright the angel eyes are. (Not that my phone camera does much of a job of capturing it.)
 

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BOTM Winner 05/15
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Awesome work! Looks clean!

What is that beauty in the background to the left?

 

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BOTM Winner 05/15
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Ooooohhh, I think it is what I thought it was. I think better pics are in order...


Pretty, pretty, pretty please?
 

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Brilliant write up mate cheers
 

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BOTM Winner 05/15
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Yes it is. It doesn't show on mobile for me either, but in the browser it does.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Just in case anyone reads this and is interested in doing it themselves, these brackets are now available from The Retrofit Source. Ask for Matt.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I made mine from 4 mm aluminium plate which is as solid as a rock. Last time I spoke to TRS I believe they were looking into providing them in steel. Have a chat to Matt about it. Either way they're definitely solid. Probably more so than the style where the projector is mounted with the locknut on the back of the projector bowl.

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 
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