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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, I'm due for a new rear tire and I need to decide on going with the stock 55 profile or a 60 series. I've read that the 60 will provide a better turn in and more grip while in a lean due to the taller profile. My only concern is that it will rub on the tire hugger.

Has anyone installed a 180/60/17 on a 2003-2006 RR? I need to know if it will fit!

Thanks
 

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I have never noticed an appreciable difference when switching between 180/55, 180/60, and 190/55.

I vaguely recall someone doing actual hand measurements and finding that individual tire variation reduced these size differences by quite a bit, but that was years ago.

All the sizes I listed cleared my 2007 swingarm, but of course exactly where your axle is will affect that. Modern tires resist changing size with heat better than older tires at least.
 

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The bike was designed perfectly with stock setup. Plenty of tire brands will give you confidence, grip, and lean angle without messing with the profile.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the feedback Fighting Chance. If there is no real benefit to the 60 handling wise over the 55 I will definitely stick with the lighter 55 series. I'm gathering it is more of a personal thing than anything. I'm tempted to try it though.

Dream boy, while I believe Honda designed a very good motorcycle, to say it is perfect is silly. No motorcycle is "perfect". I know a 180/55 works very well, but if the 180/60 works better...
 

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The bike was designed perfectly with stock setup. Plenty of tire brands will give you confidence, grip, and lean angle without messing with the profile.
Define "perfectly". 100% chance your description doesn't match most people's idea of perfect. Hell dunlop didn't even make a 180 slick for the last few years at least, I've always ran 190/55's as that's what dunlop recommends, even though they make the oem tire. Why do you think the oem tire supplier would recommend a different tire then stock? Because there is no such thing as perfect. They make different sizes for exactly what the OP is talking about, test and compare.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Damn. I just bought a 180/55/17. It's ok though. I got a good deal on it. Bridgestone S21 for $100. I haven't had a chance to ride on it yet but I'm hoping it will work well with the PP 2ct I have up front.

Once the front or rear wears out, I will get a matching set. Wibbly, what tire are you running? Seems it's pretty slim pickings in the 180/60/17 size.
 

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Define "perfectly". 100% chance your description doesn't match most people's idea of perfect. Hell dunlop didn't even make a 180 slick for the last few years at least, I've always ran 190/55's as that's what dunlop recommends, even though they make the oem tire. Why do you think the oem tire supplier would recommend a different tire then stock? Because there is no such thing as perfect. They make different sizes for exactly what the OP is talking about, test and compare.
If that's the case then why are the stickers on each bike that rolled off production still says 180/55/17? Why isn't everyone switched to 190/55 or 180/60?

Nothing's perfect we all know that. I'm using the word "perfect" loosely in term of the bike is more than capable of the rider. Having different tire size on a bike that is designed to take a specific size will throw off the geometry more than anything. Wouldn't you think Honda Engineers have thought about this and tested it before randomly chosen a tire size to roll out in production? Again, with the right tire brand and models, it will provide all the attributes the OP is looking for.

To the OP, what tires have you tried so far? Not a single tire meet your expectation?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I've tried continental contimotion, michelin pilot road 4, pilot power 3, and Dunlop Q3. That's just on my old 1994 f2 though.

On my RR I have only tried the pilot power 2ct which the previous owner had installed.

All the above tires have more than met my expectations.
 

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I woudln't worry to much mate. The 180/60 will give you a slightly better turn in due to the taller profile, however I was happy riding the 180/55 on both road and track for some years before trying the 180/60 for the first time this summer. In addition to the slightly better turn in the 60-profile tyre will also give you a little bit better edge grip due to the increased contact pactch compared to the 55 profile. I would indeed prefer the 60-profile for pure track riding, but for road riding I would be just as happy with a 55-profile. That said some riders do prefer the benefits of the 60-profile for road riding as well. It is just a matter of personal preference.

In addition, the chicken strips on a 60-profile is a bit harder to get rid of compared to a 55 profile ;-)
 

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yeah you need to work HARD to get the chicken strips off the 60. even after track days you're likely to have a little bit still.

the 55 you can rub the chicken strips off pulling out of your driveway
 

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If that's the case then why are the stickers on each bike that rolled off production still says 180/55/17?
Because only one size can be oem.
Why aren't everyone switched to 190/55 or 180/60?
Because not everyone feels the need to change the bikes geometry to suit their individual riding style.
Nothing's perfect we all know that. I'm using the word "perfect" loosely in term of the bike is more than capable of the rider.
I agree the bike is capable of more then most can use.
Having different tire size on a bike that is designed to take a specific size will throw off the geometry more than anything
That's EXACTLY the point of changing the rear tire size. Pro-link rear suspensions don't allow ride height adjustment with shims like say my F4i does. So your choice is to alter the tire height or buy an aftermarket rear shock that allows height adjustment [which all aftermarket rear shocks do], otherwise your only adjustability is to change the height of the forks in the clip ons to adjust front bike height.
Wouldn't you think Honda Engineers have thought about this and tested it before randomly chosen a tire size to roll out in production?
Of course. Kinda like how my F4i came stock with .68kg/mm springs, which are correct for a 105lbs rider. How many 105lbs American's do you know riding sportbikes? Yet every single one ever sold in America comes with that fork spring. But hey, they can make a product perfect for every rider and every varible out there right???No. Wrong. They choose what single product works best across the range of riders.
 

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yeah you need to work HARD to get the chicken strips off the 60. even after track days you're likely to have a little bit still.

the 55 you can rub the chicken strips off pulling out of your driveway
My 190/55 on my trackbike can't get the rear strips off, I touch rearsets first. I care little.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I'd probably opt for 190/55 vs 180/60
Don't forget your speedo will also be slightly out of whack with taller tire...
Actually my speedo would be closer to "in whack" with a 180/60. Going to the 180/60 would be roughly equal to taking a tooth off the rear sprocket.
 
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