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Ducati Champion Del Mondo
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This is an origianl post I posted over on www.600rr.org and you like some feedback from you guys over here. You can read my post and replies at the 600RR.org's general forum section.

Thank You!
Jason


"I know I am going to get blasted out the ass for even asking this because I am sure what 90% of you people are going to say judging by what others have said so far, DON'T DO IT! Also this site is made just for this bike and I know you guys know them best.

So I got to ask, would it be a 100% dead trap for me to buy a 600RR for my first bike? My experience is as follows, none. Well I have owned a 4-wheeler before so I do know how to shift and have been on dirt bikes but for no long period of time. So I guess how that applies to me is what I said the first time, none. =[ I am 30 years old and my thinking is as follows, I want this bike and I do not want something like a 500cc touring bike that I am going to want to sell as soon as I learn how to ride it. I would rather sink my money into something that I want to be on for years to come, a 600RR. I guess really what I am asking is this& Is it possible for me to use my head and learn how to ride this bike even if it means in a parking lot all summer? My goal is not to hurt myself or the bike. I am not looking to do wheelies or anything else like that. I just want to get from point A to B and have fun on it with a bike like this, which is my overall goal.

I spoke with this person on the phone who was in the same boat as me, only sat on a bike before and with using his head he is making out fine on his.

http://www.honda-tech.com/zerothread?id=766528

I know this is the best place for me to get answers as I am sure most of you guys all know these bikes inside and out. I know it would be easy for you guys to ream me on this but really please, honest, helpful replies. This is my life we are talking about.

Can I own this bike and respect its power?

Thank you,
Jason"
 

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Take the MSF course and start out slow and you should be fine that is if you are a "average or quick" learner. There have been folks on this board getting the RR as their first bike and just couldn't cut it. e.g. dropping the bike 3 times under 26 total miles and so on... Once you learn the bikes capabilities (power and clutch)and understand YOUR limits then you can make that final determination which I personally think you shouldn't have a probelm with. But, by taking the MSF course you have an EXTREME (can't stress that enough) advantage of succeeding on your bike and having a wonderful time enjoying it. The MSF course will also answer the obvious question of "is motorcycle riding right for me?" Let's face it, not everybody can ride so you should make an honest no bs assesment of what your getting into. If you wanna ride slow get a moped. You want a race ready bike, get an RR.

Good Luck in whatever decision you make.
 

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I definitely recommend taking the MSF course. My first bike was an 02 GSXR600 and I bought it after taking the course...I owned the bike for 11 mo. before it was stolen, but I never dropped the bike. After 3 mo. on it, I was actually riding the bike pretty hard on the twisties. But yeah, it's definitely a lot harder learning to ride a bike on any new 600cc. If I had a chance to do it all over again, I'd probably buy the sv650s and learn on that for a year or two before hopping over to the RR. Good luck and be safe.
 

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Mad Chemist
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I bought the RR as a first bike at 31 yrs old. No problems yet, just respect the bike and learn as you go,The MSF course wouldn't hurt either.
 

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I can't agree with sqtadamdee more. TAKE THE MSF course BEFORE you buy the bike! I too am buying a 600RR as my first bike. I did ride dirtbikes for 2 years when i was like 13, but haven't ridden any bikes since then (I'm 21 now). The MSF course taught me all kinds of useful things that I wouldn't have learned on my own, and I feel I will be a much better rider because of it. There were guys in the class that had been riding for 15 years and still said they learned a bunch of stuff.

Take the MSF and respect the bike and you'll be just fine.
 

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Yeah, as much as I hate to admit it, you'll probably be ok if you take the MSF. Mainly due to your age. I really agree with the earlier post though....take the MSF course not only to learn to ride, but to find out if you can and if you like it. I doubt you're one of these people but there really are those out there that just can't seem to ride no matter what. Also, if you do this, get gear and frame sliders before even attempting to ride the bike. Because the odds are extreamly high that at the very least you will drop this bike, even if only when pushing it around the driveway. Good luck with it....let us know how you fair.
 

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You need not worry about getting blasted. The fact that you are even raising the question (and a valid one, at that!) whether a 600cc supersport would be too much for you, shows a certain level of maturity and level-headedness. And being 31 helps too.

As a general rule I don't think starting off on a 600cc SS is the greatest decision anyone can make, but I think you'll be OK with it.

P.S. Darwin has a great point. A Suzuki SV650 would be a better bike to start on. It was my last bike (YSR50 -> Honda Hawk GT -> CBR400RR -> SV650 -> CBR600RR) and it was loads of fun, and it *taught* me a lot more than any of the other bikes. I still miss it.
 

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I too was in the same situation as you last summer. i wanted a sport bike so bad and when i asked for opinions all everyone told me is "you are going to kill yourself with a supersport bike like the RR". everyone told me to get a GS500 and start on something like that then move up the next year after i get some miles under my belt. In the end i did not listen to those that discouraged me. I didnt want to waste my money on something i knew i wasnt going to enjoy riding. I took the financial risk of buying what i really wanted, the RR. I told myself if i drop it I drop it, i wouldnt be claiming it under insurance anyways. (damn i cant even afford full coverage on my bike, progressive wants $2500/year with a $1000deductable, Im 21 with a CLEAN RECORD, so where would i be ahead with full coverage unless i absolutely totaled the bike). now would i say i made the right decision. YES...YES... YES... i love my bike to death. i feel the RR is fairly forgiving. still have her looking new as the day i bought her.


but i will tell you about one of the scares i did have when i first got her. i was a little overconfident on the highway one night doing about 75 around a slight bend in the fast lane (with only 2 weeks experience). as i was going around the bend i started going over the line towards the grass. i scared the sh1t out of myself. and from that night on was a lessoned learned. i had to slow it down and build up my skill or i was gonna end up hurt like others said i would. i use this night as a reminder to myself cuz if the grass could have been a concrete median AND IF I HAD LOST CONTROL i could have quite possibly cost myself my life.

the best and only recommendation i can make to you is take the MSF course offered in your state. it will teach you the basics of riding and get you familiar with the controls and operation of a motorcycle. it was the best $25 bucks i have ever spent and was very educational. i liked it so much i even tried to take it again this summer just to polish up my skills.(the class is booked for all locations though in ohio)

when i took the MSF course i was talking to my female instructor and i raised the question of whether a 600 sport bike would be too much for me and she actually said NO it would be fine for me as long as i take it slowly and get used to the bike. i was very suprised at her answer cuz i thought i was gonna get a huge lecture against a newbie buying a sportbike.

you would be suprised at how much of an advantage the MSF course gives you over the self-taught rider. i the newb was riding better than most of these guys that had been riding for years. these guys couldnt stop under the correct distance or do the figure eight inside the box. i thought to myself these are the guys bragging about riding harleys to everyone in the class and they couldnt even perform basic rider operations. :bitchslap:



Only you can answer the question of "can YOU own it and respect its power". You can own a 250 ninja and end up killing yourself.

whatever your decision is..... ride safe, build up your skill slowly, dont ride over your capabilities or with others who push the limits. Buy the correct gear and enjoy yourself.


*****be prepared you are going to get the best of both sides in this forum also.******
 

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I would say buy an old CBR with some road rash already.

In a year you should be able to sell it for the same money unless.....

Either way, your new Honda will last alot longer. :)
 
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Start out on a dirt bike. Buy an enduro and practice in the dirt. Once you get the hang of it then take the Motorcycle Safety Course on it. You'll get a feel for the throttle and learn how to shift. After that you can start thinking about the RR.

Welcome to 600rr.net!
 

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The SV650S is a little bit more tolerant to rider mistakes, like grabbing a handful of throttle in the middle of a turn. You could respect the power of RR but you're gonna hit a steeper learning curve in controlling the bike. I bet you the first couple of months of owning the RR, the bike will have more control over you rather than you controlling the bike. I feared the power of my gixxer the first time I rode it... but when I was riding my brother's zx-10 (1989), I was confident and was pushing the bike harder than my own bike since it didn't accelerate as fast.
 

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my first bike was at 22 on a 1999 r6. I didn't even know how to drive manual when i first sat on the bike. I asked a few friends...then figured out the rest on my own.

Then I took the MSF course.

Mostly though, I've learned my knowledge from being intelligent to educate myself on everything. I read all the messageboards and magazines, as well as ask dealers and shop owners millions of questions. I also discuss with other riders. Luckily, I've learned a lot and gotton better at riding. I'm also going to the track this season to learn more about my bike and improve my skills.

In the end....don't be a dumbass and you'll be fine. :idea:
 

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Even the F4i is a little bit more forgiving and still looks nice...plus its a honda :bounce: Dont get the 04 model though, banana seat :bitchslap:
 

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You can own a 250 ninja and end up killing yourself.
Not trying to flame the guy that said this cause I mostly agree with the rest of his posts but, I am so sick of hearing this kind of crap. Sure, you can kill yourself on a ninja 250, or a Busa, or a damn tricycle for that matter. The fact is, it is almost always better to learn on a smaller more forgiving bike. Anyone can learn to twist a throttle and work a clutch. It's all the other mechanics that go with riding a motorcycle that are easier to learn and more forgiving of mistakes on smaller bikes.
 

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Actually, we haven't really addressed a pretty big question: What will you be using the bike for? Commuting? Backroads / canyon carving? Track days? ........Posing? :twisted: Be honest.
 

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quasi888 said:
Actually, we haven't really addressed a pretty big question: What will you be using the bike for? Commuting? Backroads / canyon carving? Track days? ........Posing? :twisted: Be honest.
To get girls? :D
 

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GA_RR said:
You can own a 250 ninja and end up killing yourself.
Not trying to flame the guy that said this cause I mostly agree with the rest of his posts but, I am so sick of hearing this kind of crap. Sure, you can kill yourself on a ninja 250, or a Busa, or a damn tricycle for that matter. The fact is, it is almost always better to learn on a smaller more forgiving bike. Anyone can learn to twist a throttle and work a clutch. It's all the other mechanics that go with riding a motorcycle that are easier to learn and more forgiving of mistakes on smaller bikes.
+1 !
 
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MSF. Gear. Safety items for bike (frame slider). Practice in controlled environments. Slow riding on street. Enjoy.
I'm 27 now and the 600RR was my first bike. I had little experience on dirtbikes and almost none on streetbikes. I had wanted a bike since I was 7. Finally, last year I got one after having taken my MSF and having bought all my gear prior to getting my bike. Since then I have ridden almost 20 different bikes and everybody trusts me because I trust myself. They know me as reliable and dependable, albeit crazy, and they knew I had done things right by doing the course, researching the sport and equipment involved, etc. I also love my son very much so that added level of responsability and the maturity that comes with age have helped a lot. IF you can trust yourself with the bike, then go for it.
 

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Ducati Champion Del Mondo
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Discussion Starter #19
quasi888 said:
Actually, we haven't really addressed a pretty big question: What will you be using the bike for? Commuting? Backroads / canyon carving? Track days? ........Posing? :twisted: Be honest.
To be 100% honest with you the bike would be mainly to have fun on. I would say a point A to B bike in the summer time but then I am sure people would tell me that the bike was not that comfortable for that. The bike in no way would be a commute bike. I have a company car and don't have to paid insurance on it so now was a good time for me to start looking into a bike. I have been looking at buying one for the last 3 years but decided not to for money reasons. My lease FINALLY is running out on my regular car and I thought now would be a good time in my life to buy a bike because of my age and the fact that I could afford to have one. =]

I hear a lot about the MSF in these posts and rest assure I am a head of you guys, already sign up and go on the 28th of May which was the soonest I could get in. The problem with all this is timing with my insurance and with not going into tons a details I need to buy the bike now before my lease runs out to get a killer deal on insurance, $331 a year (full coverage). If it was up to me I would take the MSF course first and then buy the bike but it is really not an option at this point. I was thinking I would just go buy the bike now and not even ride it until I take the course in May so I would not develop any bad riding habits. I know this may all sound a little screwy to you guys and I got you scratching you head but if I want an RR I need to buy it next week. I have no problem waiting until I take the MSF to ride it but I need to buy it now. It is the bike I want and I am getting a good deal on an 03 as well.

Hope this answer some of your guys questions. Please keep the posts coming, the more information I have to go on the better.

Thanks.
Jason
 

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Ducati Champion Del Mondo
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Discussion Starter #20
BTW, thanks to everyone that has posted so far. You guys are a wealth of information that I really do respect.

Jason
 
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