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Discussion Starter #1
I am new to this forum but have already noticed that the consensus here is to not reccomend 600cc sport bikes for first time riders. I can see the logic in this and in many ways I do agree. I think a distinction needs to be made though as all 600's are not created equal.

A little history on how I got started (btw I'm 30 now), began riding dirt bikes at an early age and when I turned 16 I got a street/trail bike. When I was 20 I bought my first bike a 96 F3 which I put over 60,000 miles on. Last month I picked up a black 06 RR.

I would argue that an F3 or even a F4 would be a great beginers bike. They have (realative to todays sport bikes) a much more comfortable riding position. They also have proven to be stable bikes that are forgiving. They can be found pretty cheap as well. They provide enough braking too stop you quick if need be but are not as likely to throw you over the bars like current ss bikes can. People who are not mature enough to ride responsibly are going to get themselves hurt on whatever they ride whether it be a 250, 500 or 600cc bike.

I think current gen super sport bikes are much harder to learn on as they are more sensitive to minor inputs and have much more aggressive geometry, brakes, etc. and would not recommend them to a first time rider. I would recommend a F3/F4 to just about anyone though as I found it to be a very forgiving, easy to ride and a durable bike.

Edit: I fully anticipate getting flamed for this and hope I havent got off to a bad start on this forum by expressing my opinion on this topic.
 

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Welcome to the site. I completely agree with you in that 600's shouldn't not be beginner bikes but people are going to buy whatever they want. All we can do is knod our heads in disapproval as we sit back and say "I told you so" when something happens.

Hope you enjoy your new RR as much as we all do!

Welcome aboard!

fergusonv said:
Edit: I fully anticipate getting flamed for this and hope I havent got off to a bad start on this forum by expressing my opinion on this topic.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Just to make myself clear, I think some 600's would make good beginner bikes provided a responsible person is riding it. In perticular F3's & F4's would make good beginer bikes in my opinion, they are very forgiving. However, I do not think current generation 600 super sport bikes are a good idea as they are no where near as forgiving as thier ancestors.

And thanks for the warm welcome.
 

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Well I have to agree that it comes down to rider responsibilty a lot of the time. My first bike, bought only two weeks ago is a 05' RR and I cant be any happier. I'll be honest that its more bike then I need, probably by a long shot. I do however feel that I can ride semi-responsibly. I'm not going to tell you I havent broken the speed limit a time or two, but I take what I feel are "reasonible risks". Just getting on a bike is a resonable risk but one that I take out of love. I'm not sure I'am agreeing or disagreeing with anyone or any thing.... I just rode my bike into work a few moments ago and there is still a big smile across my face that won't go away.
 

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fergusonv said:
... People who are not mature enough to ride responsibly are going to get themselves hurt on whatever they ride whether it be a 250, 500 or 600cc bike...

You hit the nail on the head with that one sentence right there. Welcome.
 

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the f3/f4 already has 80-90hp. I would still hesitate to recommend anything beyond the f2 as a good first bike. but after the ex250/ex500/gs500 I would suggest the sv650, then older 600cc bikes...depending on the person. however, since theres no way to know how a person really is based on a few threads of information I always assume starting at the basics...they'll be better riders anyway if they start on something that only has 40hp...
 

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first big bike i had was a 1990 CBR600 and i found it really easy to ride and very comfortable, then i moved to another 99 CBR and now my RR.
the first two i would say would be fine for a beginner as they are easy to ride and very forgiving but the RR i think is a bike for people with a bit of experiance and have got the silly mistakes that come from getting cocky and over confident out the way.
either way they only go as fast as you ask them to
 

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What I would say to all you guys that say "I started on the 600RR and I have no problems " Well I didn't start on the 600RR, I started on a Kawi 500R. I would say that I learned more on that little bike how to ride properly and to the edge then just jumping and learning on a 600RR. Look at all the good motorcycle racers they all progress through the small bikes into the larger ones. No one starts on a 1000 or even a 600 and becomes the best racer in the world. I would never recommend any of my friends to start on a 600. I tell them if they worry about what people will say when they ride down on a 500 or a 250 then they aren't buying a bike for the right reasons. Learn small, you'll be safer, faster, and happier in the end.
 

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T.A.M. said:
Well I have to agree that it comes down to rider responsibilty a lot of the time.
I agree 100%, its not the bike its the rider thats makes all the diffence. I got an 05 RR as my first bike. I just turned over 3,000 miles today and I wouldnt want any other bike. Im 28 BTW.
 

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i agree with ya man!!! hundred percent.... i started on a Kan-a-tuna an i rode that for 16,000 even before jumpin on a RR or any thing made for the race track.
 

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Welcome Fergus. Great first post!

imho, dirtbike experience is a major, major advantage. Already having the ability to control a motorcycle means you only have to worry about your environment and your ego while you find your way around the roads. It considerably reduces one of the primary risks.
 

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I rode around on an EX250 for a few seasons before stepping up and I honestly would recommend that route to anyone.

It all comes down to responsibility though, you're right. I'm not saying that I wasn't responsible enough to have a 600 as my first bike, I just felt way more at home on a 250 as it is easily one of the most forgiving bikes I've come in to contact with.
 

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I believe it's the rider not the bike. Any bike that you haven't rode before is going to feel different or awkward from the previous bike you rode. If you've never rode before and get on a bike for the first time then it won't be an awkward feeling, just a new and probably scary feeling. Hell, I went 6 years without riding a bike and I bought a moped to get around on because I wrecked my car. That felt awkward at first but I got used to it. After I had my 600RR for 4 months and then got on the 250 nighthawk at the MSF course, the nighthawk felt awkward and I had to get used to it. I don't know about the rest of you but when I twist the throttle just a tiny bit on my 600RR it only goes a tiny bit faster. I know that if I twist it farther and quickly, the bike will fly. That's why I always twist the throttle slowly. Honestly, anyone can learn to ride any bike, some quicker than others. It's only when the riders ride beyond their limits that they get in trouble. If you know your limits and respect the bikes power then you should be fine. Just my opinion.
 

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Mexican Irish said:
I believe it's the rider not the bike. Any bike that you haven't rode before is going to feel different or awkward from the previous bike you rode. If you've never rode before and get on a bike for the first time then it won't be an awkward feeling, just a new and probably scary feeling. Hell, I went 6 years without riding a bike and I bought a moped to get around on because I wrecked my car. That felt awkward at first but I got used to it. After I had my 600RR for 4 months and then got on the 250 nighthawk at the MSF course, the nighthawk felt awkward and I had to get used to it. I don't know about the rest of you but when I twist the throttle just a tiny bit on my 600RR it only goes a tiny bit faster. I know that if I twist it farther and quickly, the bike will fly. That's why I always twist the throttle slowly. Honestly, anyone can learn to ride any bike, some quicker than others. It's only when the riders ride beyond their limits that they get in trouble. If you know your limits and respect the bikes power then you should be fine. Just my opinion.
Thats a really good way of putting it. Im not saying anyone specific from this site but Ive run across people who had the attitude that they think they are special b/c they ride a 600cc Sportbike and if your a new commer its something you cannot handle b/c they think they are high and mighty for some reason. Anytime you have something new or something your not used to its going to feel akward. Its not that 600cc is to much to handle, its not that a rider has to have a certin skill level in order to jump on one and not crash it, its just you have to have a good head on your shoulders amd you will do fine. Once I got used to the RR after riding it for awhile I was soooooo happy I did not waste my time and money on a "beginer" bike such as 250 or a 500. Its my money, I got what I wanted.
 

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I agree Warp Speed, to the extent that any monkey can learn to ride any motorcycle, but I'd bet my left gonad that the same rider working his or her way up to a bigger bike rather than jumping straight on will have a wider and higher-level set of skills.
 

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buck_y_lee said:
I I'd bet my left gonad that the same rider working his or her way up to a bigger bike rather than jumping straight on will have a wider and higher-level set of skills.
do you think that is set in stone or do you believe that each person is diffent therefore some people will pick up skills quicker then others?

You can take 10 people and show them all the same basic riding skills on the same bike but your going to have 10 people in the end with varying riding ability b/c some learn/pick up things quicker then others.

Just saying you dont have to start small and work your way up in order to become a skilled and better rider. Im not saying everyone should just go out and buy a liter bike but I think you see my point.
 

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Of course different riders will progress at different rates, but the same rider will definately have different outcomes by taking the different approaches.

Errors occur at the margins, near the bike's or rider's limits. If you've experienced the limits on a less powerful or less reponsive machine you are better equipped to handle them at the next level.

As an example, you might come into a corner too hot. On a 250 you can grab some of its mediocre brakes and tip that little sucker further in to make the turn. The potential exists on a faster, better braking and sharper handling machine to come into that same corner faster, meaning less margin for error. The rider with the experience will be better equipped to manage the finer inputs required.

Just my opinion of course.

edit:
In my state the licensing laws are good (it's not often I say that about road rules!). Learner riders are restricted to lower powered machines, but if you are aged 30 years or over and have decent driving record you are able to virtually hop on any bike you like straight up.

I like this approach because, and I think I'm likely in agreeance with you here, that attitude is probably the most important factor in limiting risk. So despite my ******** ramblings on skill level and how progression from one 'class' to the next is valuable, I think it is more important that riders have a sensible approach, no matter what they ride.
 

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Buck_Y_Lee

I see your point as well. I think both cases ring true for diffrent riders. I dont think there is one set way written in stone that makes a rider a better rider or a set way written in stone for how every rider should start out AKA: smaller bikes.

Everyone is diffrent and I think more times then not people can start out on a 600RR and not have any problems. I would not reccomend it to everyone either but Im saying if you respect the bike from the start and are not an immature person then you will do alright. I do agree that your learning curve may be not as well as if you started out on a smaller bike but I'll take that for now if its true in lue of being suck on a kawi 500 right now, the RR is so much damn fun.
 
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