Honda CBR 600RR Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey sorry if this point has been made already....

Titanium v stainless

$120 more for titanium. why? whats the difference?

better quality and will it extend the lifetime?

any difference in sound or HP?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,768 Posts
Hey sorry if this point has been made already....

Titanium v stainless

$120 more for titanium. why? whats the difference?

better quality and will it extend the lifetime?

any difference in sound or HP?
titanium weighs less .. and really probably has a SHORTER life span than stainless does -- titanium likes to get very brittle when it gets hot, unlike ss
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
this is for a

"AKRAPOVIC SLIP-ON/BOLT-ON MUFFLERS- HONDA CBR600RR (2009-2011)"
Apart from looks, weight and if you have the ti exhaust get the matchin link pipe no probs if you dont as the stainless steel looks good (what I have) but if you later decide to buy it seperate like I did the price difference is huge ie extra £100 in the uk to add it to the exhaust package but to buy the ti link pipe on its own is £320+......Crazy....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
532 Posts
I would go steel since the pipe is under your seat. The only real different I would imagine is weight. Titanium cools down really quick as well buy very brittle while hot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
685 Posts
wrong, nerds. theres a reason why the aerospace industry uses titanium for like, everything, starting from the mid 20th century. blackbird? titanium. naval ships, satellites, the new F22? all with tons of titanium in them.

titanium is about 40% lighter than steel by volume, stronger, and naturally forms its own oxidized layer of something funky that protects it from the atmosphere and corrosion. buy titanium stuff if you can afford it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,768 Posts
wrong, nerds. theres a reason why the aerospace industry uses titanium for like, everything, starting from the mid 20th century. blackbird? titanium. naval ships, satellites, the new F22? all with tons of titanium in them.

titanium is about 40% lighter than steel by volume, stronger, and naturally forms its own oxidized layer of something funky that protects it from the atmosphere and corrosion. buy titanium stuff if you can afford it.
Yes the weight is the big part .... but you are not talking a HUGE weight savings on a bikes exhaust a pound or two at most ... which for a street bike means nothing .... and yes ti is more likely to fatigue and crack than stainless under high heat .... this is why you do not wrap a ti system in exhaust wrap

So not wrong

Sent from my DROIDX using Motorcycle App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,211 Posts
Yes the weight is the big part .... but you are not talking a HUGE weight savings on a bikes exhaust a pound or two at most ... which for a street bike means nothing .... and yes ti is more likely to fatigue and crack than stainless under high heat .... this is why you do not wrap a ti system in exhaust wrap

So not wrong

Sent from my DROIDX using Motorcycle App

^^ "Boosh" lol

 

·
*BOTM Feb '11, Mar '12*
Joined
·
23,598 Posts
No not wrong. Titanium has excellent heat resistance. Do you kids even know what the blackbird is? Damn young'ns hah
He didn't say it wasn't heat resistant, just brittle under high heat. Which is true, most race teams replace their exhausts after a season. I bet if you looked at the structure of those planes you mentioned you won't find much titanium in the jet engine. We all know cars have used titanium valves and valve springs but you won't see them use it in pistons and rings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
532 Posts
No not wrong. Titanium has excellent heat resistance. Do you kids even know what the blackbird is? Damn young'ns hah
So you're comparing the a multimillion dollar spy plane with a $1000 exhaust? Example!! I had a custom titanium exhaust for my Nissan Silvia (while stationed in japan). Cracked and let me tell you it was a pain finding someone to weld titanium. Ended up cutting it and making a stainless slip joint.

Was that the only plane they made mostly out of titanium? you're referencing a plane that has been out of commission for YEARS now. I'm pretty sure you can give Skunk Works plastic and they will make it indestructible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,768 Posts
So you're comparing the a multimillion dollar spy plane with a $1000 exhaust? Example!! I had a custom titanium exhaust for my Nissan Silvia (while stationed in japan). Cracked and let me tell you it was a pain finding someone to weld titanium. Ended up cutting it and making a stainless slip joint.

Was that the only plane they made mostly out of titanium? you're referencing a plane that has been out of commission for YEARS now. I'm pretty sure you can give Skunk Works plastic and they will make it indestructible.
and he is talking about a plane that does not reach the temps of what an exhaust system reaches...

and the ENTIRE blackbird was NOT made out of titanium

the skin, you know the part affected by the heat from air friction, is NOT titanium,

and they did NOT use titanium because of its "heat controll" capabilities, they used it because its so freaking light, there is NO other reason they used it

really, titanium is a horrible metal to work with, its so god damn fussy and finicky
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,768 Posts
Commercial (99.2% pure) grades of titanium have ultimate tensile strength of about 63,000 psi (434 MPa), equal to that of common, low-grade steel alloys, but are 45% lighter.[6] Titanium is 60% more dense than aluminium, but more than twice as strong[6] as the most commonly used 6061-T6 aluminium alloy. Certain titanium alloys (e.g., Beta C) achieve tensile strengths of over 200,000 psi (1,400 MPa).[10] However, titanium loses strength when heated above 430 °C (806 °F).[11]

It is fairly hard (although not as hard as some grades of heat-treated steel), non-magnetic and a poor conductor of heat and electricity. Machining requires precautions, as the material will soften and gall if sharp tools and proper cooling methods are not used. Like those made from steel, titanium structures have a fatigue limit which guarantees longevity in some applications.[9] Titanium alloys specific stiffnesses are also usually not as good as other materials such as aluminium alloys and carbon fiber, so it is used less for structures which require high rigidity.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titanium
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
It also depends on what grade of titanium they are using, a grade 2 only has a yield strength of 65k psi max and grade 5 is 128k.

If your only doing a slip on Stainless, if full Ti.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top