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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everybody.

I plan on buying a new chain and Sprockets for my 07 cbr600rr but I don't know if I should get aluminum sprockets or Steel. What have been your experiences with the sprockets you have bought and what are the pros and cons of each type. Thank you
 

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This is a really opinionated topic. I like using steel because it's stronger and should last longer. On the other hand aluminum is lighter and you'll have the power of 1000 janapese village cats.
 

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I would go with steel, and even if you don't change your gearing its generally cheaper to switch to 520 chain and sprockets. So also worth looking into.
 

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520 and steel...

steel is safer otherwise everyone would run alum imo...

Who cares about price there cheap i just dont want a alum sprocket to shatter and have a chain rip into my leg
 

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520 and steel...

steel is safer otherwise everyone would run alum imo...

Who cares about price there cheap i just dont want a alum sprocket to shatter and have a chain rip into my leg
Show me concrete evidence of that happening even once. BS that's perpetuated by the Internet desk jockeys.....

OP, steel last longer than aluminum but is heavier, a 520 is a lighter chain than a 525 or 530 but theoretically lasts longer. Those are your factors you need to consider, leaving out sprocket size. It will take a VERY skilled rider to "feel" a difference between either size chain in day to day riding. It's just most people change sprockets at the same time or their chain isn't changed until the point it's completely shot and therefore not very efficient.

Conventional mechanics wisdom says you should replace the chain and sprockets together as a set. My experience has been a 520 chain lasts 13k-20k miles, a 530 lasts 15k-25k and aluminum sprockets go 10-15k, steel, especially OEM, can go 30k+. So looking at the numbers, with reasonable care, if you go 520 and aluminum you should "expect" to replace the entire setup around 15,000 miles, sometimes the chain gets funky first, sometimes it's the sprocket. If you go steel you will most likely be looking at replacing the chain at ~20k and probably replacing sprockets that are still useful.

Against most accepted practices I personally do steel sprockets and generally do two chains to every one set of sprockets. I do get slightly less wear on the second chain than the first but it's neglegable and worth it in my book. But in the end you need to decide what fits your bije, your riding style and your budget.
 

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Another vote for steel..... I've used them both and absolutely no way I would use aluminum again..... they literally just fall apart, and tear your chain up in the process. I won't use anything but steel anymore
 

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Aluminum is just fine for rear sprockets. People have been using them forever. They don't explode or shred into little pieces making your chain cut off your leg any more than steel sprockets. They just wear out quicker. If someone is stupid enough to not keep an eye on sprocket wear regardless of the material used then they may one day get what they're asking for.

What nobody is saying is that application has much to do with where you might use steel vs aluminum. A heavy powerful superbike? There's probably negligible advantage in using aluminum and the costly disadvantage is that they will be going through them almost as fast as tires. Now for a lightweight lower power machine like a Moto3, 125, or street 250? There's not much advantage in using steel (apart from durability) but aluminum can be beneficial since the lower power and lighter potential weight of the package would be a factor. On a 600? Whatever. Use aluminum (Renthal makes some great sprockets!) and keep a closer eye on wear or use steel.

Can't make up your mind? Split the difference and use a light steel sprocket.

 

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Aluminums last 1/4 the mileage. Never had a chain problem using them even with the quick wear, I would just use 2 rear sprockets to make it the life of the chain vs 1 sprocket for 2 chains when using steel. Unless its a track bike I see no point in using aluminum.
 

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Aluminums last 1/4 the mileage. Never had a chain problem using them even with the quick wear, I would just use 2 rear sprockets to make it the life of the chain vs 1 sprocket for 2 chains when using steel. Unless its a track bike I see no point in using aluminum.
I just stack two aluminum sprockets on top of eachother. Then I get twice the life out of 'em.
 

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Cool story bro.
 

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Always steel for the front sprocket. I've gone between aluminum to steel and back to aluminum on the rear. Steel lasts longer, Aluminum will make you pay for it really fast if you've adjusted your chain wrong. On a 1000 I wouldn't use aluminum on the account that the extra torque that would get applied to the teeth could cause some shearing. On a 600 it's negligible but as most have said you won't feel a difference. The only way you'd notice a difference is if you saw a drop in lap time, but that has many factors into it so you still might not notice, and if you did notice we're talking milliseconds, which again is subject to maybe you braked later, opened the throttle sooner, or you had a better line, etc.
 

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You're probably right, but just in case lol. I've had guys at my work mil out some sprockets before.
 

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Show me concrete evidence of that happening even once. BS that's perpetuated by the Internet desk jockeys.....

OP, steel last longer than aluminum but is heavier, a 520 is a lighter chain than a 525 or 530 but theoretically lasts longer. Those are your factors you need to consider, leaving out sprocket size. It will take a VERY skilled rider to "feel" a difference between either size chain in day to day riding. It's just most people change sprockets at the same time or their chain isn't changed until the point it's completely shot and therefore not very efficient.

Conventional mechanics wisdom says you should replace the chain and sprockets together as a set. My experience has been a 520 chain lasts 13k-20k miles, a 530 lasts 15k-25k and aluminum sprockets go 10-15k, steel, especially OEM, can go 30k+. So looking at the numbers, with reasonable care, if you go 520 and aluminum you should "expect" to replace the entire setup around 15,000 miles, sometimes the chain gets funky first, sometimes it's the sprocket. If you go steel you will most likely be looking at replacing the chain at ~20k and probably replacing sprockets that are still useful.

Against most accepted practices I personally do steel sprockets and generally do two chains to every one set of sprockets. I do get slightly less wear on the second chain than the first but it's neglegable and worth it in my book. But in the end you need to decide what fits your bije, your riding style and your budget.

nah not at all was a post or info on there website about it. I forget it was mottomummy or ridersdiscount. They even stopped selling them I believe. Cant remember exactly i think they was a r1 rider who was injured after his alum rear sprocket snap into pieces and was injured by the chain...

I think it was more prone to happen on the liter bikes running 520's or something. I wont take the risk after hearing that.
 

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nah not at all was a post or info on there website about it. I forget it was mottomummy or ridersdiscount. They even stopped selling them I believe. Cant remember exactly i think they was a r1 rider who was injured after his alum rear sprocket snap into pieces and was injured by the chain...

I think it was more prone to happen on the liter bikes running 520's or something. I wont take the risk after hearing that.
It was the Superlight steel sprockets and the was a bad batch machined by the factory:

http://www.600rr.net/vb/17-03-06-rr-modifications/410369-broken-superlite-sprockets-moto-mummy.html

Again, nothing wrong with aluminum for liters or 600's they simply wear faster than a steel. I've run both types on all sizes of bikes, they work just fine in any application.
 

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