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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Guys!
So I really want to get a 600rr, but am wondering if I'm ready for it...

I started riding exactly a year ago (I'm 34-yo btw) and my first and only bike so far is 2006 Honda Shadow Spirit 750. I've put few thousand miles on it already, but I can't stop day dreaming about a super sport, and CBR600rr is what I'm fixated on!

I'm also a rather responsible rider; I don't want top speed, rather the agility of a sport bike; ease of handling, etc. My shadow feel like I'm muscling with a cow at times.

So, 34-yo responsible father of two, 1 year / 2k-3k miles behind my belt. Should I go for it, or do you think I need more years/miles behind moving to super sport (btw I'm glad i started with a cruiser, i think it was very forgiving at the begining; i know some people START on super sports...).

Your thoughts?

Thanks!
Martin
 

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Hi Martin,

Go to a dealer and test ride one. If it scares the **** out of you then look for something else. The CBR600RR is considered one of the most forgiving super sport bikes.

I started on an Ninja 300 and also drove 3k miles before switching to a 600RR, the transition wasn't that difficult.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hi Martin,

Go to a dealer and test ride one. If it scares the **** out of you then look for something else. The CBR600RR is considered one of the most forgiving super sport bikes.

I started on an Ninja 300 and also drove 3k miles before switching to a 600RR, the transition wasn't that difficult.
not one dealer in my area offers test rides on sport bikes (that I know of, I check with 2) :(
 

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You just have to ride within YOUR abilities.
Well said.

Ride what makes you happy, but ride within your limitations. It's a different bike for sure and handles differently and provides a lot more temptation. Think of upgrading from a Buick Park Ave to a Corvette. But there are plenty of MSF classes available to advance your skill level as well.

Also, no dealers in my area allow test rides either. They'll let you sit on the bike, that's about as far as that goes. Do you have any friends on super sports?
 

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I've had my motorcycle license since late September of 2014, I took the MSF course.

After I got my license I HAD TO HAVE A BIKE, like YESTERDAY. I went out and bought a 2009 Ninja 650R. I convinced myself that I'd be happy with it, but deep down I knew I wouldn't be.

I picked up my 600RR in early February, sold my 650R, and couldn't be happier.

Ride responsibly and within your limits, I know I do. It's only gonna go as fast as you twist your wrist.
 

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Everyone has really hit it right on, ride responsibly and within your comfort zone. With some road experience I think you will do just fine on a nice new CBR600RR!
 

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Not trying to be a jacka**, but no one here can tell you if you are ready for a super sport or not. We can tell you our experiences and the risks but ultimately only you can make that determination...good luck and ride safe
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Everyone has really hit it right on, ride responsibly and within your comfort zone. With some road experience I think you will do just fine on a nice new CBR600RR!
that is exactly why i picked a used, slightly beat up, 750cc cruiser as my first ride. i had a feeling it would be more than enough power for starters, but forgiving enough to a noob. not that i'm an expert rider by any means, it's only been a year and few thousand miles, but i think i can operate 600rr safely ;-)

when i got my bike a week after finishing MSF course and getting my license endorsed, i spent first 3-4 weeks riding the back streets of my neighborhood; traffic absolutely terrified me! after two months i started taking it to work and it was down hill from there (no pun intended :) ).

someone once told me that the most dangerous time for a rider is not the first 6 months, but the second 6 months! i just hope i'm past that and can safely hop onto a super sport and be OK. that's really why i asked the question in the first place. i feel confident to ride in the rush hour traffic to and from work; of course i enjoy weekend riding better though. i just want to make sure i'm not being overly confident about super sport (yes, the temptation to hit it hard will be there, and i'm sure at times I will, just like I do on my cruiser... but always away from traffic and on a road i'm familiar with).

anyways. it's not gonna happen anytime soon; life has other expenses in store for me; but MAYBE some time this year. in the mean time i'll be enviously reading your posts guys :-D
 

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Only you can honestly answer that question. For me I knew it was where I should have started and did so. 1 week after passing my MSF and getting my motorcycle endorsement on my license I bought my first bike which was an 07 600rr. It is very doable but you have to understand the risks.

FWIW I was your age when I bought it.
 

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Only you can answer that question if you think you've got the experience under your belt to switch. For those that say a supersport or superbike was their first bike and all is cool to go for it, don't listen to them. Things may have worked out just fine for them but they didn't do it right (gonna get flamed for that one). That's just like buying a Z06 Corvette or Skyline GTR as a first car. You can do it, but you'll be spending a portion of your attention on managing to operate the thing smoothly where clumsy, sloppy, or over enthusiastic inputs will magnify your errors. That's not exactly the best way to become more natural with riding while at the same time developing and honing your road sense and traffic strategies. Again plenty of people go right out and get a supersport right off and dodder around on it. It can be ridden like any other bike. In fact something like a 600RR when kept under 7k RPM will be a very tame ride. At that range the power is very modest and linear. The problem will be in perception and restraint. Perception in that the bike is designed to be stable and responsive at high speeds making your perception that you're not getting in over your head until you're well over your head. The restraint part comes in in that the bike effortlessly lives at speeds that in a state of legal and physical risk that feel quite natural. In fact I feel that a modern 600 doesn't feel like it's in it's sweet spot till about 60mph and feels there till well near 100 before you feel like you're pushing it. The bike is happy there. On public roads though there are lots of things that can suddenly interrupt that happy scene. Can you use restraint to ride within the flow of traffic or will temptation have you blasting 30+mph above prevailing traffic? As the comic book saying goes "with great power comes great responsibility". If you think you can then yes you are in no more danger on a 600 supersport than any other bike except with greatly improved braking, handling, and acceleration. If you're confident in your abilities to read the roads and navigate human and road hazards thrown your way then go ahead. If you're confident you can ride smartly and not "explore the limits" on the street then go ahead.

ps. a mental reminder I use to help restrain my street riding is to pat a kiss on my garage door as I leave with the reminder that the goal is to return in the same condition I left, just a little happier. You have children so they are extra incentive to be smart on a sport bike.

Good luck.
 

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The problems happen during emergency situations. Over braking/accelerating/compensating can happen in micro-seconds. It's all about seat time, and proper instruction.

MSF course

Advanced Riders Course

Track days

more track days
 

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ive been riding for almost 1.5 years now. i rode a 2004 ninja 250r for the first year of my riding life(@24, im 25 now). i rode about 10,000 miles on that bike. I learned a lot on that little bike, cornering, counter steering, how to ride in heavy traffic, how to use a clutch/throttle. also this was the first bike i have ever been on. i bought a 2007 CBR600RR almost exactly a year later. every one might be different but i was ready for a "bigger" bike after just a year of riding. Im still not the fastest rider around but learing everything on a smaller bike deff helpped and i took what i knew and applied it the 600. im still learning more, always pushing my limit.
 

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By asking for advice regarding the step up to the RR you have already proved you have some common sense and self restraint. If you can ride within your limits you will be fine. All you need is seat time, the RR only wakes up after 9000rpm anyways so don't be scared, it will quite happily cruise you around peacefully. Remember, power is not the main cause of accidents, it's those panic moments where your survival reactions kick in, can happen on the slowest of turns. Get the RR, get to know it and enjoy.
 

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My first bike was an 05 600RR I was 27 at the time, 10 yrs later I'm on my second CBR after taking a break for a few yrs. Great bike just ride in your limits you will be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Went to a local dealer (Riva Motorsports) and sat on a CBR600rr... fit me perfectly, to my surprise, because I am 6'4" :)

Time to put my Shadow on Craig's List :D
 

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Why are you seeking permission? You seem ready my friend. It's only advised that you don't start on a 600. But you can upgrade to one as early as 3 months. It really just depends on your skill level and maturity.
 

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My only gripe is when people think that no one can start out on a 600, as if it is beyond everyone's limits b/c they did not start on a 600 therefore no one is capable of.

Can a 600RR get you in a lot of trouble, kill you, and many other bad things.....yes it can. But it does not mean a mature level headed rider cannot start out and learn on one either.
 
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