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Discussion Starter #1
Mods:
All lamps removed
Rad fan delete
Stand delete
Pair blockoff
Yoshi RS5 full exhaust
Ohlins Ttx shock + Nix cartridges
R6S throttle tube
Vortex 520 -1 +3 chain sprocket conversion
Li-Ion battery
Healtech quickshifter
Apex adjustable clipons
Vortex adjustable rearsets
Cheap ebay engine crash guards
Bauce ecu flash
All service and mods except ecu reflash has been done by me, I feel confident doing this stuff since I have a somewhat extensive engineering background.

Would appreciate advice on my sag numbers:
Front: Static 24mm, Rider + gear 38mm
Rear: Static 10mm, Rider + gear 35mm

Veteran novice trackday group. Although, I have been offered I bump 2 times, for some reason I haven't taken it. Maybe next time.
 

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Registered
Joined
133 Posts
Mods:
All lamps removed
Rad fan delete
Stand delete
Pair blockoff
Yoshi RS5 full exhaust
Ohlins Ttx shock + Nix cartridges
R6S throttle tube
Vortex 520 -1 +3 chain sprocket conversion
Li-Ion battery
Healtech quickshifter
Apex adjustable clipons
Vortex adjustable rearsets
Cheap ebay engine crash guards
Bauce ecu flash
All service and mods except ecu reflash has been done by me, I feel confident doing this stuff since I have a somewhat extensive engineering background.

Would appreciate advice on my sag numbers:
Front: Static 24mm, Rider + gear 38mm
Rear: Static 10mm, Rider + gear 35mm

Veteran novice trackday group. Although, I have been offered I bump 2 times, for some reason I haven't taken it. Maybe next time.

Your sag numbers would be ok for the road, seems a little soft for the track though, for comparison i've had mine professionally set up and have 32mm rider sag at the front and 22mm rider sag at the rear.
Apparently the current trend is to run the rear firmer to get the tyre working more and biting the track harder...
Mine has WP factory shock and inserts supplied for SS through TenKate
 

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2003 Honda CBR 600RR
Joined
6,790 Posts
What fork & shock spring rates are you running? Your sag numbers suggest a soft spring with high preload, it's better to run a stiffer spring with less preload for a track bike.
 

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7 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Your sag numbers would be ok for the road, seems a little soft for the track though, for comparison i've had mine professionally set up and have 32mm rider sag at the front and 22mm rider sag at the rear.
Apparently the current trend is to run the rear firmer to get the tyre working more and biting the track harder...
Mine has WP factory shock and inserts supplied for SS through TenKate
Even though my sag numbers sound higher for the track, I feel very comfortable with it right now. I have also lost about 10lbs since the post so the rider sag numbers may have dropped a few mm atleast.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
What fork & shock spring rates are you running? Your sag numbers suggest a soft spring with high preload, it's better to run a stiffer spring with less preload for a track bike.
I don't think the shock spring is soft because of the following reasons:
1) I have 10mm of static and 35mm of rider sag on the rear.
2) I have room to adjust the preload in both directions.

As far as the fork springs go, I don't know the stiffness/spring rate of the springs, and neither does the member here who sold me the setup. However, upon evaluation of the static sag, rider sag and maximum dive under braking I am not way off the ballpark. I may have just adapted to the compliant setup.
 

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You have the feedback you asked for, so now at least you have a direction to go next time you're at the track so if i were you i'd do your first session as is and then creep your preload up F&R a little and see how you like it. You can always go back if it's terrible but usually a firmer set up will translate to more confidence and speed (as long as it's within the correct range of course)
Record what you do as you go and keep an eye on your zip tie on your fork leg and your tyres for tell tales, hopefully you won't discover you need firmer springs but if you've lost 10lbs you might be ok.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You have the feedback you asked for, so now at least you have a direction to go next time you're at the track so if i were you i'd do your first session as is and then creep your preload up F&R a little and see how you like it. You can always go back if it's terrible but usually a firmer set up will translate to more confidence and speed (as long as it's within the correct range of course)
Record what you do as you go and keep an eye on your zip tie on your fork leg and your tyres for tell tales, hopefully you won't discover you need firmer springs but if you've lost 10lbs you might be ok.
I appreciate the feedback. Yes I will try to see if a little bit more preload helps me under braking.I have dialed in the compression damping quite a bit to control dive under braking. With the current setting, I have about 20mm from the bottom out position (not the axle casting but the physical max bottom end of the fork travel). I've heard (from track riders running upper I and A groups)10-15mm from bottom is usually a safe number for max compression under braking.
 

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If you increase preload you will likely want to decrease compression damping or it may feel harsh and choppy, particularly in bumpy braking zones, you may also find that you will need to increase rebound damping. It's a balancing act and the really fast guys know when to add or subtract 1 turn of preload and can notice one click difference.
I've had mine set up with a good baseline that works and frankly, i'm not game to change it because i'll likely make it worse, i'm not fast enough to tie the suspension in knots or get myself in trouble either so my base set up is fine for me, i do tinker with tyre pressures though, and i can definitely feel a difference and see the results after each session....
 

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2003 Honda CBR 600RR
Joined
6,790 Posts
Something I have learned over the years & what has been taught to me by experts in the realm of suspension tuning is to make one adjustment at a time & test it. Take notes or log every adjustment & create a list of what the results were. Doing multiple adjustments at the same time will likely confuse you & mess up the results, this method has served me & my clients very well.
 
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