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so my left turn signal punched a whole in the fairing cuz some jackass tipped over my bike in the middle of the nite. i've managed to pop the piece back in place to minimize the visual damage but i was wondering if i had any options in terms of repairing it or at least supporting it so it doesn't just pop back out. i'm not sure i'm willing to shell out a coupla hundred for a new front end.
 

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I'm dealing with the exact same problem at this moment because I had a gravel-patch lowside a week ago. Before I offer my solution, can I just say mounting the turn signals directly onto the bodywork was an incredibly stupid design on the part of Honda. (Well, maybe it wasn't stupid in their eyes -- probably results in more replacement bodywork sales for them.) Yamaha's design is much more crashworthy -- the stalks pass through holes in the bodywork and mount to points on the frame, so int he event of a spill, there is no bodywork to punch through.

Now -- here's what you can do to patch the hole. Go to your local hardware store / Home Depot / Lowes and get a fiberglass repair kit. Remove your upper fairing (will take you 30-40 minutes, having the shop manual helps). Premix the resin/hardener that came with the repair kit. Using a small paintbrush, apply some of the resin to the backside (inside) of the fairing about 1" around the hole. Cut out a piece of the fiberglass cloth that roughly matches the shape and apply it to the area you just resined. Using the brush, apply more resin directly onto the cloth piece, saturating it. Let this first backing layer to dry a bit. Then, cut out another small piece of fiberglass cloth, and apply it directly onto the backing piece, but from the outside of the fairing. Apply resin. Keep adding more layers of cloth and resin until the thickness is ALMOST equal to that of the fairing. Once you've added your last piece of fiberglass, use the resin like Bondo and apply a good layer on top. Let it dry completely. You can then sand down the hardened resin with some 80-grit sandpaper, finishing/feathering with 200 or 400 grit, and you will then have a surface that you can paint and / or drill new holes for the turn signal.

There's one problem though .. since you no longer have that molded "lip" that the stock turn signals are attached to, there is now less space for the signal's mounting bolt. The bolt will hit the ram air duct cover. Outside of fabricating a sort of "riser" platform to sit on top of the bodywork and increase the clearance, I'm not sure how to address this issue -- possibly cut down the bolt a bit? I just bought a set of Gregg's flushmounts, but I might still run in to this issue when I get to that point. (I only have the first backing layer of fiberglass on at the moment.)


EDIT: You can also use this link as a guide: http://www.sportrider.com/tech/146_9510_hand/

The only thing is that they recommend actual Bondo for the last, top filler layer. But most people that have done this type of thing say that the fiberglass resin works just as well if not better. (Bondo has a tendency to pop right off, unless you secure it by drilling those anchor holes as the article recommends.)
 

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quasi888 said:
I'm dealing with the exact same problem at this moment because I had a gravel-patch lowside a week ago. Before I offer my solution, can I just say mounting the turn signals directly onto the bodywork was an incredibly stupid design on the part of Honda. (Well, maybe it wasn't stupid in their eyes -- probably results in more replacement bodywork sales for them.) Yamaha's design is much more crashworthy -- the stalks pass through holes in the bodywork and mount to points on the frame, so int he event of a spill, there is no bodywork to punch through.

Now -- here's what you can do to patch the hole. Go to your local hardware store / Home Depot / Lowes and get a fiberglass repair kit. Remove your upper fairing (will take you 30-40 minutes, having the shop manual helps). Premix the resin/hardener that came with the repair kit. Using a small paintbrush, apply some of the resin to the backside (inside) of the fairing about 1" around the hole. Cut out a piece of the fiberglass cloth that roughly matches the shape and apply it to the area you just resined. Using the brush, apply more resin directly onto the cloth piece, saturating it. Let this first backing layer to dry a bit. Then, cut out another small piece of fiberglass cloth, and apply it directly onto the backing piece, but from the outside of the fairing. Apply resin. Keep adding more layers of cloth and resin until the thickness is ALMOST equal to that of the fairing. Once you've added your last piece of fiberglass, use the resin like Bondo and apply a good layer on top. Let it dry completely. You can then sand down the hardened resin with some 80-grit sandpaper, finishing/feathering with 200 or 400 grit, and you will then have a surface that you can paint and / or drill new holes for the turn signal.

There's one problem though .. since you no longer have that molded "lip" that the stock turn signals are attached to, there is now less space for the signal's mounting bolt. The bolt will hit the ram air duct cover. Outside of fabricating a sort of "riser" platform to sit on top of the bodywork and increase the clearance, I'm not sure how to address this issue -- possibly cut down the bolt a bit? I just bought a set of Gregg's flushmounts, but I might still run in to this issue when I get to that point. (I only have the first backing layer of fiberglass on at the moment.)


EDIT: You can also use this link as a guide: http://www.sportrider.com/tech/146_9510_hand/

The only thing is that they recommend actual Bondo for the last, top filler layer. But most people that have done this type of thing say that the fiberglass resin works just as well if not better. (Bondo has a tendency to pop right off, unless you secure it by drilling those anchor holes as the article recommends.)
I've used this method before and it works well. Also, if you want to add a little more strength get something called PC7 from your hardware store. It comes in two parts like jb weld and when combined forms a very hard, stong epoxy. After putting that on the inside of the crack, use the fiberglass on top to further reinforce the area.
 

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fiber glass doesn't hold well overall to plastic. The resin and plastic expand and contract at different rates when the temperature goes up and down. also, the resin you get at the hardware store is polyester resin, dries very stuff, so stressed, the patch will pull away from the part. the very best way to fix it is plastic welding, welding another piece of plastic to take the place of the missing piece. Your next best bet is to fill in the hole with a flexible bondo, ask your auto body shop for their recomendations, I would use a product called "metal glaze," it fills, easy sand and is flexible enough not to pop out. Now that said, Here's what you do:

1.lay tape on the inside of the upper where the hole is. on the outside, lay in the filler enough to cover the all the tape you can see.

2.remove the tape and mix up some "plastic weld" (noun, not the act of welding, but a two tube mix.) and spread generously on the inside of the filler to cover the filler and around it on the plastic for about an inch-ish.

3. fill in the outside with the filler nup to the lip of the hole, let set for a few minutes. You can shape the filler with a razor blade while it's soft, but not spreadable. You'll know the difference. or you'll find out quick.

4. let dry, fill in low spots as necessary, sand, finish, paint, clear, sand, and polish.

if you need any help, send a message.

jeremy
 
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