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Discussion Starter #1
So i've been looking at getting a 600rr and a post came across Facebook that interested me. It's a 2006 with less than 10k miles on, been lowered, and had a light drop at 5mph (so he says). He's asking for 2500, wheels and chain are both is good condition. While i've had a 2002 F4i before, I am not familiar with a 600rr, especially it being a 2006 model. What am I looking at as far as repairs for the stator cover and lower fairings? Not too concered with the light scratched on the left fairings. What are your thoughts on this overall?







 

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you can check out bikebandit (dot com) they have a microfiche of all parts for the bike. you can determine the cost based on what you want you replace. the stator cover is about $66.
 

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you can check out bikebandit (dot com) they have a microfiche of all parts for the bike. you can determine the cost based on what you want you replace. the stator cover is about $66.
I was already looking through that site. I've only previously dealt with replacing a stator cover from my previous CBR, however, I only got around to taking it off as I ended up selling the bike as being totaled. As for the lower fairings, is there a bracket that goes along with them or do they just mount directed to the frame?
 

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Prices that low generally mean title problems.
There is still money against the title, though he'd used the sale money to pay off the loan and receive the Title. I don't see that being too much of a problem except having to wait on the title, but I haven't had experience in that situation before. The overall price for the bike seems to make the trouble worthwhile though.
 

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Go for it. Check the forks, swingarm and clip-ons for damage. Other than that, they seem to be OEM fairings and a little re-paint will fix that. The stator cover isn't too damaged and if you wanted to replace it, it would be a huge deal. It's a good price for the bike with that low of mileage. Just make sure you receive the title.
 

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^ tst means it wouldn't be a huge deal.

Yeah that is almost suspiciously low given the small amount of damage, but if the seller seems like someone who just wants to sell and hasn't researched market value it's probably fine.

More importantly than the damage, check:

Fork seal integrity (pump forks, check for oil)
Ask when last fork service was done
Check chain length and flex; links should rotate and not bind
Check sprockets for chipped or worn teeth
Check tires for wear, manufacture date ( > 5 years old, no good)
 

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Just be sure he doesn't run off with the cash and stick you with the lien. Check the name on it. Not sure how it works in the US but can you simply change ownership and then pay off the lien yourself? That might be safer than trusting a stranger with your money.
 

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The price is obviously sending up red flags for a lot of people here, as is the lien.

One thing to watch for is the fact that is has been down. I've crashed at 5 mph, so it is possible, albeit extremely upsetting and embarrassing lol. Read the scratches you find anywhere, especially that engine case. Does it look like the bike slid far on the ground? Do the scratches in various places all seem to corroborate the bike sliding in one direction (from the same incident)? The guy who sold my bike flat out lied about it being down, and swore up and down that he was the most honest person I would ever meet. Found out later on that the reason he had a custom paint job was because he crashed and repaired the plastics with bondo.

It really depends on the appearance of the bike in person and if the seller is acting sketchy or not.
 

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When the bike has a lien, it's nice to do the change of money and paperwork right there at the lienholder bank or credit union - they can basically do the hand off right then. A Bill of Sale with both parties signatures and some contractual language is nice too.
 

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You wont be able to recover any money once the seller collects it from you he might even claim you stole the bike . In other words do not assume anything like Fighting said if you can pay the bank yourself and get proof that you paid them until you recieve the title from them in the mail then by all means finalize the deal if not keep looking
 

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There is still money against the title, though he'd used the sale money to pay off the loan and receive the Title. I don't see that being too much of a problem except having to wait on the title, but I haven't had experience in that situation before. The overall price for the bike seems to make the trouble worthwhile though.
'Waiting' for the title seems to be a flag.

As mentioned above, do the transaction with the title holder present and finish the deal.

Otherwise, the bike seems fair.
 

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The price is obviously sending up red flags for a lot of people here, as is the lien.

One thing to watch for is the fact that is has been down. I've crashed at 5 mph, so it is possible, albeit extremely upsetting and embarrassing lol. Read the scratches you find anywhere, especially that engine case. Does it look like the bike slid far on the ground? Do the scratches in various places all seem to corroborate the bike sliding in one direction (from the same incident)? The guy who sold my bike flat out lied about it being down, and swore up and down that he was the most honest person I would ever meet. Found out later on that the reason he had a custom paint job was because he crashed and repaired the plastics with bondo.

It really depends on the appearance of the bike in person and if the seller is acting sketchy or not.
When the bike has a lien, it's nice to do the change of money and paperwork right there at the lienholder bank or credit union - they can basically do the hand off right then. A Bill of Sale with both parties signatures and some contractual language is nice too.
+2 to the above 2 posts.

Title is the main thing. Make sure you go to the bank with the owner at the day of sale and pay it off right then and there. DO NOT just give the seller the money to pay the title on his own while you wait for the new title to arrive to you in the mail.

2nd thing to really consider is the extent of damage. Even at low speeds, things can go wrong esp with older bikes. You will have to make positively sure there is nothing wrong with the engine, frame, starter, forks, etc so bring it to a shop or bring a mechanic with you.

Good luck and keep us posted.
 
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