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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, I'm new to the forum. :wave:
I bought today a beautiful '05 (blue, practically new) and can't wait to ride it (but must wait until end of January).

I am not a complete newbie, I rode a unrestricted Cagiva Mito for ~2 years until about 4 years ago.
After I sold it I kept commuting daily on a small scooter and racing bicycles, road and mtb (~10-15k km/year).

This is just to say that I have some motorbike experience, I'm used to be on the road and handle two wheels, but never rode a powerful engine like the 600rr. The Mito was a nice bike with real brakes and aggressive position, quite powerful for a 125cc (some 35hp IIRC), but nothing compared to a 600rr.

I will take a course also because it's mandatory by law here to get the driving license upgraded to >25kW.

I read a lot of posts suggesting to start with a small bike to avoid picking up bad habits that are hard to loose.
But what are exactly those bad habits?
I hope I learned enough on the 125 to begin learning the RR, but I don't want to start the wrong way!


p.s. waiting for the new beast here's a pic of the old Mito...
 

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Welcome to the forum mate! You're going to love that RR! I was in the same boat just a little while back. We too (here in Australia) are restricted to 250's or 500kw/tonne. Once you get your full license you can ride whatever you want.

Bad Habits? I can think of a few:

- Riding/driving too close to the person in front
- Not wearing the right protective gear, especially gloves. I see ppl riding w/ out gloves all the time and it scares me. To me, gloves are even more important than a leather jacket!

Anyway, enjoy the forum. There's a lot to learn here!
 

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I think what is more important, by far, are motorcycle handling and accident avoidance habits. They need to be properly taught, practiced, and then done over and over again on the road to make them instinctive, so when you get into the inevitable jamb, you don't have to think - you just act. This is why most feel the motorcycle skills courses are so important as they teach you these basics, and you build on them. And if you have never been through a motorcycle training course, no matter how long you have been riding, you need at least a basic course, IMO.

There are a number of things that are taught, but two of the most important ones are 1) to get a motorcycle to turn quickly you must get it to lean quickly, and to do that you turn the handlebars in the opposite direction of the turn. And 2) about 70% of a motorcycles stopping power comes from the front wheel braking system.

There have been a couple of occasions early in my riding career where I screwed up on 1 or 2, or 1 AND 2, and the result was not good. So you don't want to be riding with bad habits, you want to learn the correct way, from a professional instructor.

Smaller bikes are a little easier to get proficient on these skills, and others, without having to worry about huge power, vise grip brakes and rapier handling (sound like a CBR?) in the equation.

Good luck,
Dave
 

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I started off on a 600rr...actually rode a 1100XX for my very first time LOL, anyway some get lucky some dont...I have had my bike for a year now and as far as bad habits....I would say, not really paying attention to pre-check before I ride. Also hard time trying to go speed limit. As far as bad habits I could of picked up from starting on a more powerful bike compared to a smaller one I cant really tell you because to me it seems I handle the 600 very well.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the welcome guys!

Looks like I got some basics right with the 125: countersteering, no brakes while turning, distance from front vehicles, etc.

But the two-fingers thing... :confused3
I always used two fingers, I also see Moto GP guys doing that way.
Why all fingers? Maybe you have less chances of slipping away from lever?

Braking power is not the issue here I suppose, with one finger I can easily endo a mountain bike (bicycle) with rim brakes, let alone a cbr with two huge rotors...
 

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2 fingers on the brake is what they WANT you to do, and what you need to do in order to get endorsed in the class. But like almost everybody uses 2 fingers. Me, personally, I use 3 fingers on the front brake and 2 on the clutch. It juse feels better..

As far as bad habit are concerned? Well, the only thing i can really think of is that I have a tendency to ride the thing like a damn bicycle. Wayyy too comfortble on the RR..lol.
 
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Hi all, I'm new to the forum. :wave:
I bought today a beautiful '05 (blue, practically new) and can't wait to ride it (but must wait until end of January).

I am not a complete newbie, I rode a unrestricted Cagiva Mito for ~2 years until about 4 years ago.
After I sold it I kept commuting daily on a small scooter and racing bicycles, road and mtb (~10-15k km/year).

This is just to say that I have some motorbike experience, I'm used to be on the road and handle two wheels, but never rode a powerful engine like the 600rr. The Mito was a nice bike with real brakes and aggressive position, quite powerful for a 125cc (some 35hp IIRC), but nothing compared to a 600rr.

I will take a course also because it's mandatory by law here to get the driving license upgraded to >25kW.

I read a lot of posts suggesting to start with a small bike to avoid picking up bad habits that are hard to loose.
But what are exactly those bad habits?
I hope I learned enough on the 125 to begin learning the RR, but I don't want to start the wrong way!


p.s. waiting for the new beast here's a pic of the old Mito...
I'm not sure of the Mito's capability, but one of the bad habits i always talk about include the misuse of the brakes and suspension during hard deceleration. some of these new riders who just pick up the 600rr (or any supersport for that matter) don't realize how important compressing the suspension is when braking. it's incredibly important to know when it is and when it isn't. reading a bike is also very important. It isn't necessarily so much about engine displacement but rather the rest of what makes a motorcycle a motorcycle.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm not sure of the Mito's capability, but one of the bad habits i always talk about include the misuse of the brakes and suspension during hard deceleration. some of these new riders who just pick up the 600rr (or any supersport for that matter) don't realize how important compressing the suspension is when braking. it's incredibly important to know when it is and when it isn't. reading a bike is also very important. It isn't necessarily so much about engine displacement but rather the rest of what makes a motorcycle a motorcycle.
This is very interesting. Could you please elaborate on the topic?

I don't know how the rear brake will be on the RR, the Mito had a powerful Brembo front brake (for its weight), and the rear was almost inexistent (just useful for minor corrections). So when braking hard you had all the weight transfered to the front. The result was that the fork compressed quite a bit, very noticeable by night because the light drastically changed direction pointing down to the road.
 

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i'm pretty sure what they meant by bad habits are basic newbie habits throttle abuse, panic brakes, body positioning, reflexes etc. Having big displacement bikes' just making the outcome worse should anything goes wrong.
 

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In reply to the brakes, I garuntee everyone of you will stop in a shorter distance with all fingers on the brake. My uncle is the advanced msf course coach and he broke my 2 finger motocross habit. I argued w/ him of course and he straight up owned me. This is with standard levers
 

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In reply to the brakes, I garuntee everyone of you will stop in a shorter distance with all fingers on the brake. My uncle is the advanced msf course coach and he broke my 2 finger motocross habit. I argued w/ him of course and he straight up owned me. This is with standard levers
you must have weak fingers
 

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welcome to the forum. one bad habit to avoid is target fixation. remember to always look where you want to go.
 
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This is very interesting. Could you please elaborate on the topic?

I don't know how the rear brake will be on the RR, the Mito had a powerful Brembo front brake (for its weight), and the rear was almost inexistent (just useful for minor corrections). So when braking hard you had all the weight transfered to the front. The result was that the fork compressed quite a bit, very noticeable by night because the light drastically changed direction pointing down to the road.
but when you did that, compressed the forks i mean, i'll bet the chassis was more stable and the bite was considerably more controllable and manageable because the forks were mushing the rubber into the pavement with a force equal to ~1.5 bikes. with your weight as far back as controllable, and the front suspension compressed to it's max controllable, you could bring that lever all the way to the grip and not have a lock up... unless you were trying to turn too, which is another newbie mistake. braking too much for grip level mid turn. i see this a lot in target fixation cases. the problem is that newbies forget to modulate brake pressure. they don't listen to the bike and just lock up like Windows. completely worthless. i think you understand the situation pretty well. i'm sure you'll be juuuust fine on the 600rr.

and yes, in these situations, the rear brake is worthless. it has it's merits though... for the experienced i mean.
 
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