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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
*EDIT* Made a build thread in the proper section and added a ton of pictures.
http://www.600rr.net/vb/showthread.php?p=7179953



Was a 09 phoenix. Kid bought it and road it through a fence. Thankfully he lived. Now it's... well...



So far my parts list is

Air intake channel
Bar ends
Battery Tray
Brake Lines
Coolant tank/lines
Front brake controls/MC
Front fairing stay
Grips
Radiator
Radiator hoses
Rear sets
Rotors
Stabilizer arm
Swingarm
Throttle tube
Tires
Under nose trim
Upper triple tree

Should make a nice cheap track bike when it's all back together. :gun1:
 

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Congrats! Enjoy the rebuild or the track build!
 

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Nice! I look forward to seeing your build.

Quick question, I see you are in a tacoma, is that a short bed? I was curious if I could get an RR in mine with the tailgate down.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Congrats! Enjoy the rebuild or the track build!
Nice! I look forward to seeing your build.

Quick question, I see you are in a tacoma, is that a short bed? I was curious if I could get an RR in mine with the tailgate down.

Thanks! Will be making a thread with better pics when I start doing some work on it. The tacoma is a short bed yes. Fits fine with the tailgate down.
 

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This could be a really fun project. Parts are easy to find, and you'll end up with another 600RR when you're done.

Win/Win
 

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Hey how much did u pay if u dont mind me asking?

Looks like fun btw!
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
This could be a really fun project. Parts are easy to find, and you'll end up with another 600RR when you're done.

Win/Win
Yup. Ordered all the parts I know need replacing today on ebay for about 600 total. Still gotta get some vortex rearsets and other track goodies.

Hey how much did u pay if u dont mind me asking?

Looks like fun btw!
$2k even. I figure by the time I get all the parts I need and powdercoat the wheels/forks I'll be somewhere around $3,500 for a personalized track bike that I restored. Much more rewarding than just spending that money on a turnkey track bike. I have a good bit of experience working on cars but almost none on bike so this will also be good for me to build my working knowledge of bikes.
 

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Good for you. I'm quietly shopping around for a deal like this as well. I want to get my hands dirty building it back up for both the experience and satisfaction. Not sure if it is worth going to auction for a salvage bike or just shopping around on CL.
 

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have fun! building is way more fun than buying! it can cost more but if you factor in the entertainment value and the feeling of satisfaction when you're done it's totally worth it
 

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Building a crashed bike is fun, but before you get too far make sure you're starting with a solid foundation. At this current point it's cheap and easy to have a shop check the forks and frame are straight; what sucks is to get it all together and realize it pulls or handles strange because of either. Or throw a bunch of money at fork upgrades and determine they're shot.

Any bike with a front end impact I build gets stripped and checked. It takes surprisingly little to tweak stuff sometimes and I've seen hard hits do nothing and soft hits (relatively speaking) tweak fork tubes and affect operation.

Cool project, you'll learn a ton.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Building a crashed bike is fun, but before you get too far make sure you're starting with a solid foundation. At this current point it's cheap and easy to have a shop check the forks and frame are straight; what sucks is to get it all together and realize it pulls or handles strange because of either. Or throw a bunch of money at fork upgrades and determine they're shot.

Any bike with a front end impact I build gets stripped and checked. It takes surprisingly little to tweak stuff sometimes and I've seen hard hits do nothing and soft hits (relatively speaking) tweak fork tubes and affect operation.

Cool project, you'll learn a ton.

Mike
That's a good idea and one I wish I had done before ordering all the parts yesterday. How do I go about doing that? Or would I need to take it to my local shop? And what level of torn down does it need to be if I take it to my shop?
 

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Looks like a nice rebuild platform.

I have the swingarm, rotors, upper triple, stabilizer arm, and a left side rear set.

PM if interested.
 

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That's a good idea and one I wish I had done before ordering all the parts yesterday. How do I go about doing that? Or would I need to take it to my local shop? And what level of torn down does it need to be if I take it to my shop?
Contact a local race shop, one that works with the local race/trackday organization and tell them what you have and what you're looking for. Should be real expensive or more than an hour of their time if they find nothing.

I would say as torn down as you can get it but as it sits in your pic is about the right level. The less you have on it they have to remove, the better and cheaper. What they are looking at are the forks and steering stem as well as the rear wheel alignment. Also the head bearing area can get oval or even crack if the impact was just right; someone on here late last year ran into that with their crashed bike and needed to build a sleeve to get it right again.

Mike
 

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Looks like very little damage. Yes, the front end should be, at the very least, taken apart and re-assembled with proper torque values to set the pieces correctly. Even better to have a shop check straightness, and check the headstock. The good thing about removing the entire front end, is you can replace the headstock bearings easily which is just good maintenance.

One interesting thing about the front end; those are 2006-2007 1000RR rotors on that bike; a rare 'upgrade'. You just don't see it very often.
 

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don't look too bad, hope it is not a pain and you enjoy fixing her up.... :thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Looks like very little damage. Yes, the front end should be, at the very least, taken apart and re-assembled with proper torque values to set the pieces correctly. Even better to have a shop check straightness, and check the headstock. The good thing about removing the entire front end, is you can replace the headstock bearings easily which is just good maintenance.

One interesting thing about the front end; those are 2006-2007 1000RR rotors on that bike; a rare 'upgrade'. You just don't see it very often.
Weren't good enough to stop the kid from going through the fence. :retard:

I can't really tell if the rotors are straight right now, gonna have to take them off to check. In the next few days I'm hoping to remove both wheels, forks, triple trees, rotors and swingarm. Not really sure how I'm gonna support the bike during this time. :ponder:

If forks and wheels check out they'll be sent to powdercoater to get blasted and coated fluorescent yellow. Will have to see if my local shop is willing to send a guy to my house to check my frame and all the other suggestions ITT. Have no way of getting it to the shop unfortunately.
 

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They need a special machine to check straightness; it's not an 'eyeball' it thing.

I would get some wood to place under the oil pan, and some straps to keep it stable. Or if you have something to attach it to the ceiling, some ratchet straps do well (make sure the ceiling can support 400lb).

Rotors are almost always straight, since it's so difficult to hit them against something hard (the front wheel would have to be totally messed for that to happen straight on.) That said, I did buy my 07 with a bent rotor, but it's pretty easy to check by hand - if the wheel doesn't spin well or you can visually tell one of the rotor buttons is messed, it's probably toast.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
They need a special machine to check straightness; it's not an 'eyeball' it thing.

I would get some wood to place under the oil pan, and some straps to keep it stable. Or if you have something to attach it to the ceiling, some ratchet straps do well (make sure the ceiling can support 400lb).

Rotors are almost always straight, since it's so difficult to hit them against something hard (the front wheel would have to be totally messed for that to happen straight on.) That said, I did buy my 07 with a bent rotor, but it's pretty easy to check by hand - if the wheel doesn't spin well or you can visually tell one of the rotor buttons is messed, it's probably toast.
May have to borrow an engine hoist from a friend. Don't trust the ceiling joists.

If frame is shot I'm gonna be SOL, already ordered all the other crap I need to put it back together. :retard:
 
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