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whats up fellow riders as i have been getting faster on the track i've h been noticing more and more brake fade maybe its probably my pads im using EBC double H.
i know there are a ton of different pads out there so i need some help on your trail and errors for pads Thanks a ton..
 

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I like Vesrah RJL. Tried them based on suggestions from a few local trackday instructors and had good results.

I've used the EBC HH but on a different bike, so I can't really compare the two.
 

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Just another thing to check - how often are you changing your fluid?

If it hasn't been for a while (or you don't remember), try that first; fluid is cheaper than pads and track use does work it harder than normal...
 

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do you have steel lines?
when was the last time you de glazed your rotors and pads?
what fluid are you using?when was the last time it was changed?

the hh pads themselves are a decent pad for an avg pace rider. If you a faster guy you may need to upgrade your pad as they are not meant for a super high heat and tend to fade off.
 

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Things that affect fade or lever travel and feel:

Pad thickness: As pads wear thinner they run hotter and transfer more heat to the fluid and other components inducing fade. In some cases the backing plate may even warp from heat which then acts like a spring against the piston caliper force instead of transferring pressure to the rotor. = fade

Fluid age: Brake fluid is very hygroscopic, which means it absorbs moisture. It also becomes contaminated as rubber seals break down and metal parts corrode. The older the fluid is the more time it has had to absorb moisture and contaminates which contribute to gas bubbles when the fluid is under pressure and heat. Gas compresses which results in a spongy lever = fade

Fluid quality: The higher the boiling point of the fluid the more resistant it is to forming gas bubbles from moisture or contaminants. The good stuff is more expensive, but it makes a difference.

Brake lines: Rubber hose expands more than steel. Any expansion in the lines is robbing efficiency in brake pressure that would otherwise be applied to the caliper piston = fade.

Master Cylinder: Radial master cylinders and the ratio of fluid (piston bore/travel) moved offer many options to optimize brake feel at the lever.

Calipers: Radial and monoblock calipers again optimize feel by reducing flex at the rotor interface.

Rotor thickness and quality: Similar to brake pads the thicker the rotor swept area the more it acts like a heat sink reducing transfer to the other key components and fluid.

The better the parts are between your finger tips and the rotor the better your brakes will operate and the higher your confidence will be. Keep them well maintained and clean as well to help maximize their operation.

Pad type is like a swirling vortex of personal opinion, experience, and preference. Bottom line get some good race grade pads and make sure your rotors are burnished when bedding in new pads. Don't be afraid to experiment with different materials and fluids. Learn to change pads and bleed your fluid often as you get faster.
 

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d
when was the last time you de glazed your rotors and pads?
I honestly don't know a single person who does that and with no ill affects.

I got alot of fade last season as I pushed my braking points, but its to be expected with oem brake lines. EBC makes much better pads then the HH's, ebpc or some letter mashup like that type of name. Vesrah is universally respected so you can't go wrong there.
 

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i went from oem to sbs dual carbon and rate them quite highly. ive recently changed to race brake fluid with steel lines and upgraded mastercylinder and now they feel pretty awesome.
 
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