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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everybody! I had my brand new CBR delivered yesterday. Oh my God, it's so beautiful!

I'm moving up to it from a Vespa (which only has one gear), and I'm really enjoying it. But, other than a few occasions I've never driven a standard. Shifting correctly is taking up so much of my attention, that it's hard to concentrate on anything else.

I have three questions.

1. I can get it into gear, and can shift up to second. I am stalling out like crazy on hills though. It's like, I normally leave it in the friction zone for a second and let the bike move forward - but it doesn't work very well on a hill. It's so particular. Am I supposed to give it more gas? What am I doing wrong?

2. Are you supposed to push in the clutch when just letting the engine idle? For example, there's a really long hill next to my house I just coast down. The engine sputters if I let off the throttle, so I push in the clutch. Is this correct?

3. How is shifting from 1/2 and downshifting different than going into 1st from a full stop? I am worried to not robotically go through the same motions, but it takes me a second or two and I know that's not fast enough. Is there a trick I don't understand?

Thanks so much for your help!

Bri
 

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bri,
first as you let out the clutch you should be steadly increasing the throttle (smoothly) practice on flat land and it will become second nature
there are two ways to go down that hill you could pull in the clutch and coast or you could be in say 3rd gear and let the engine braking keep your speed steady with time you will figure out which suits you best.
i don't fully understand what you are looking for in your third question the gear pattern neaver changes down to engage first from nutural and then five up for 2-6 to down shift just reverse the pattern till you hit first then 1/2 click up for nutural.
I hole this helps
 

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More so than anything else OP you might wanna practice your stopping and going in your neighborhood or parking lot for a little white. Get a better understanding for the clutch and it's release point mixed in with giving it throttle. Not to be a d*ck but you sound like any other noob starting out on their bike for the first time so just practice that and hills really shouldn't be different.
 

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it just takes time. Get out their and try. just be safe about it try different things. o and try not trying so hard just relax itl come to you.
 

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pretty much like everyone else said. learn to take off by letting out the clutch and letting the bike pull itsself. if you arent good driving with a clutch learn on a car first. riden a bike is easier if you understand a clutch really well. but be safe youll learn how to ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm taking a MSF class. I've done the written part, and my riding section is Saturday and Sunday. It sounds like everyone is saying it just takes time, so I'll keep practicing.

The throttle is so much more powerful than my Vespa, obviously. Everything about the bike is a million times more sensitive. It's pretty overwhelming!

But, just so I can know - is it correct to push in the clutch while idling down a hill?
 

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lol they answered that above... it depends. You can pull in the clutch and use the brakes... or you can put it in a higher gear and use engine braking (without using the clutch at all) to slow you. There is no "correct" answer.
 

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I had the same problem going uphill when I first started. I have a 250 instead of a 600rr tho so ur throttle will be extra sensitive compared to mine. For me when i first started I had to rev a little while holding the clutch in while the rear brake is engaged. Then when you want to go you slowly release the clutch till you feel the engine pulling your bike then release the rear brake. Give it a little more throttle as you fully release the clutch as your rpm will dip a little. Your bike should be moving at this point and you should be on your merry way!
 

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MSF course for sure ! If u don't already know how to ride/drive a "standard" its going to be pretty tough mentally to get it going on a 400lb bike.. As for coming down a hill, I would suggest you staying in gear you'll have more control because of "engine braking".. and for downshifting and all the other stuff, it'll come to you in time.. Just have fun and ride safe
 

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The MSF course will help you a lot I'm sure. I don't know if you have access to a manual ATV or even a place to ride one, but IMO that is the safest and easiest way to learn a standard transmission on a bike. Especially a sport quad because they have somewhat of a touchy clutch and rev high like our bikes. It is EXACTLY the same shifting pattern, you use the exact same hands to clutch/front brake and feet to shift/rear brake. But you don't have to worry about balancing/handling the bike or other drivers trying to run you off the road.

I've driven standard vehicles all my life so I had a basic understanding of how to work that kind of transmission on a bike. I also rode ATVs when I was a kid and I bought my own in 2006 so when I hopped onto my first bike '91 Ninja EX500 I took right off and had no problems with hills or anything. Same thing on the 600RR. I'm going to buy another ATV in the near future and that is how I'm going to teach my gf to work the manual tranny on a bike before we get her a 2-wheel bike because she is scared about driving with a manual. Perfect way to learn IMO.

:+1: on taking it to an empty parking lot or going to a neighborhood that isn't busy and that has different size hills to practice launching on. Thats exactly how I learned to drive my first manual, Jeep Wrangler, in high school.

Be safe riding out there!
 

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Don't worry about how to shift gears yet, that is going to obviously be taught in the remaining two days.

Thank you for taking the Basic Rider Course though. Personally, I grately appreciate that. :thumbup:

The biggest things you need to focus on is head turn and relaxing while on the bike. Don't over think what you are being told and don't get down on yourself if you don't get something the first time.

The key is to listen, relax and have a good time.

Something else that may help, though it is just personal preference, is there are two ways of positioning your feet on the footpegs. I prefer to ride on the balls of my feet. Some feel more comfortable riding with their foot planted on the footpeg.

Experiment with this.

So recap: Listen to the instruction, Head Turn (Look where you want to go) and Relax or Chillax as my daughter tells me...lol.

Be sure to update us after you complete your course.


Peace,

Gabe
 

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But, just so I can know - is it correct to push in the clutch while idling down a hill?
Well legally your vehicle is supposed to be under power at all times when moving, so no you shouldn't pull in the clutch when going down hill. Realistically though this is impossible to police so its completely up to your discretion.

I always leave it under power because the engine braking helps you maintain a constant speed, while holding the clutch in will make you accelerate. Besides, it just sounds cooler when using the engine brakes going downhill, especially if you ever get a v-twin.
 

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As some people said, practice in a parking lot using NO throttle. Just put it in first and ease of the clutch. Of course you'll need to let the clutch "slip" for a while to get going without stalling but its a good exercise to get you used to the engagement point of the clutch.

While going up hill leave the bike in a lower gear than you normally would. If you're starting off up a hill, you will need to apply more throttle and let the clutch "slip" for a longer period of time/distance in order to get going.

Going down a hill your best bet is to downshift into a lower gear. The engine braking will control your speed without wearing out the brakes and if you need to make any sort of evasive manuvers it will be easier to just get on the gas without worrying about the clutch.

Not sure what you mean in question #3. If I were you I wouldnt worry too much about proper downshifting and "rev matching". It's going to take a while to get used to riding. Once your more comfortable you can worry about the technical stuff.
Have fun!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Hey, thanks everybody! I just got a chance to get out and ride today, and did much, much better. I only stalled out one time. The advice to downshift instead of going into neutral was invaluable.

You know, scientists have shown that when you sleep, your brain builds new pathways to help you learn new skills and solve problems. Maybe that's why I did so much better today. I just need to keep practicing, and I'll build up these skills. I am very sure after today I'll be able to master this.

Thanks again!

Bri
 

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More so than anything else OP you might wanna practice your stopping and going in your neighborhood or parking lot for a little white. Get a better understanding for the clutch and it's release point mixed in with giving it throttle. Not to be a d*ck but you sound like any other noob starting out on their bike for the first time so just practice that and hills really shouldn't be different.
what ^ said
 

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The ride section of your MSF will be so useful to you. I cannot wait to see your feedback from the course. Oh and don't feel bad if you drop their bike, it isn't the first or last time those bikes will go down.
 

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you should have taken a lesson or two on a smaller bike or taken MSF to learn the basics before buying a new CBR. The CBR isnt the bike that you should be learning this kind of stuff on. But since you already have it...

Follow the advice in the above posts. As you know the clutch in your rr is very overwhelming for new riders. Learn where the friction point is and give throttle accordingly. Good luck
 
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