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Is there any issues with having the bike up on its center stand pegs for a day, a week, a month?
 

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Huh? Uh no but we dont have center stands tho kick stand you mean or rearsets? So confused
 

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it's not like the bolts holding the spools on are going to fatigue and randomly break... what could go wrong?
 

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Thats called a rear stand. Nope leave it on as long as you want. That what mine sits on for the 5 months of winter we have.

Also if you are going to store the bike for and extended period keep it on the rear stand so the tires dont get flat spots from sitting on the concrete.
 

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Thats called a rear stand. Nope leave it on as long as you want. That what mine sits on for the 5 months of winter we have.

Also if you are going to store the bike for and extended period keep it on the rear stand so the tires dont get flat spots from sitting on the concrete.
Having the rear up and the front down will increase the chance of a flat spot forming on the front tire in comparison to using the OEM kickstand by itself. This is obviously due to having more weight on a single tire, in this case, the front tire.

ZeroHour24, below is a picture of a center stand. A center stand is more common on older motorcycles. If you see a modern motorcycle, last 20 years, with a center stand, it is usually aftermarket.

 

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Having the rear up and the front down will increase the chance of a flat spot forming on the front tire in comparison to using the OEM kickstand by itself. This is obviously due to having more weight on a single tire, in this case, the front tire.
Sorry, gotta call bull on this one. You won't magically add weight to the front tire just by lifting the rear a few inches. The weight that would have been supported by the rear tire is just now taken up by the rear stand. Has no impact on the front.
 

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Sorry, gotta call bull on this one. You won't magically add weight to the front tire just by lifting the rear a few inches. The weight that would have been supported by the rear tire is just now taken up by the rear stand. Has no impact on the front.
:surprise: ... I am going to assume you mean it has little affect on the front tire, not, no affect. If that is your point than keep in mind that little affects have larger implications down the road, especially over several months.

If you are serious that it has no affect than imagine the rear of the bike standing the height of the bike, completely vertical. The amount of weight on the front tire would be the total weight of the bike. Even though this imagination is an exaggeration, it shows you how raising the rear any height, will increase the weight on the front of the tire. It might be a small amount with just a few inches but it WILL increase the chance of forming a flat spot on the front tire.

If you still think gravity is magic than please let me know so I can explain further.
 

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:surprise: ... I am going to assume you mean it has little affect on the front tire, not, no affect. If that is your point than keep in mind that little affects have larger implications down the road, especially over several months.

If you are serious that it has no affect than imagine the rear of the bike standing the height of the bike, completely vertical. The amount of weight on the front tire would be the total weight of the bike. Even though this imagination is an exaggeration, it shows you how raising the rear any height, will increase the weight on the front of the tire. It might be a small amount with just a few inches but it WILL increase the chance of forming a flat spot on the front tire.

If you still think gravity is magic than please let me know so I can explain further.

I wasn't going to respond to this until I read your final comment. Since the rear is being supported by a stand, your "exaggeration imagination" is moot. There is something supporting the rear in the practical application, however in your scenario there is nothing holding up the rear, so of course the front will bear all the load. Using your scenario, let's pretend a stand exists and will lift the rear alllllll the way to where you want to put it (making the bike completely vertical). Will the front still bear the full load?

Now...angles come into affect here. So up until the bike passes about the 45deg angle mark, it will have SOME added pressure to the front. Enough to largely affect flat spots (raising it a few inches)? I doubt it.
 

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I got one of these tonight:
I have a pitbull front and rear stand. I keep my bike on both the front and rear all winter long... and whenever i am not riding for more than a week I put them on it to keep the tires from absorbing moisture front the concrete and also from getting flat spots...

And using the rear alone is NOT adding more weight to the front. :crackup: Don't worry @ZeroHour24
 

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Now...angles come into affect here. So up until the bike passes about the 45deg angle mark, it will have SOME added pressure to the front. Enough to largely affect flat spots (raising it a few inches)? I doubt it.
It's a slow day at work so I'll bite. As long as both tires are supported, they'll always share the same load regardless of tilt. Imagine two 50kg weights connected by an imaginary weightless rod. Each weight is supported by a separate platform scale. When the platforms are parallel, each scale will read the mass of the weights at 50kg. Now raise one platform in an arc to any tilt, each platform still supports only the 50kg mass so the scales will read 50kg... Same with vertical, and will be the same if inverted. This is physically no different than supporting a bike, whether it be stands, or wheels.

If you still think gravity is magic than please let me know so I can explain further.
Please teach me, master. :fyou:
 

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It's a slow day at work so I'll bite. As long as both tires are supported, they'll always share the same load regardless of tilt. Imagine two 50kg weights connected by an imaginary weightless rod. Each weight is supported by a separate platform scale. When the platforms are parallel, each scale will read the mass of the weights at 50kg. Now raise one platform in an arc to any tilt, each platform still supports only the 50kg mass so the scales will read 50kg... Same with vertical, and will be the same if inverted. This is physically no different than supporting a bike, whether it be stands, or wheels.



Please teach me, master. :fyou:



Wouldn't the bar having weight skew this? And as I stated previously, wouldn't lean angle have an affect?


Not arguing, just is always fun to stretch the brain.
 

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Wouldn't the bar having weight skew this? And as I stated previously, wouldn't lean angle have an affect?


Not arguing, just is always fun to stretch the brain.
Nop, the bar won't change the outcome. The mass of the bar is going to be shared across the two platforms. So each one would read 50kg+partial weight of the bar. You can try this at home if you have two scales and a dumbbell or any two weights you can attach to a rod, like a broom stick and mess with one of the heights as long as you keep the scales parallel.

To swing this thread back to topic, by lifting the rear only, nothing would change on the front. To avoid flatspots and other nasties altogether, lift both if it's going to be sitting for ages. Few days or a week on rubber won't have any dramatic effects.
 

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Ha this is stupid.... who f ing cares
 
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