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Discussion Starter #1
hey. so i have a question. i just got a new 600rr. if i put all the mods on it (fender eliminator, flush side lights, exhaust, HIDs, etc), being that theyre mostly illegal or not DOT approved, what are the chances that ill get pulled over because of them? anyone know or ever gotten "caught" for theyre mods? would cops make a big deal?
 

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In 5 years, I have never been pulled over and have had all of those mods except HID at one point or another. I think it all depends on how you ride and what the cops are like in your state.
 

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i have blue lights all over tag position is nowhere near legal, no tag light, flush mounts, and exhaust, i ride philly, nyc and delaware alot, and been pulled over a few times and still have never had my modz pointed out, (i know people who were fined for modz, but they werent excacly cooperative) if you get pulled over for something crazy... reckless, excessive speeding ect... (or if you get an attitude) their probly gonna hit you with anything they can, but for everyday type stuff, no signal, right on red type stuff you should be fine!

btw... ive checked on fines for flush mounts, blue lights ect... crazy money
 

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It depends on....

..your attitude on a stop and the attitude of your local agencies. When I worked as a Deputy, If I could see the tag and the turn signals were visible, that is all that really mattered. Cram your plate so far forward as it was in front of the tire, and I am going to make a stop to run it, (Nobody likes a thief, and you want your agencies to watch for stolen vehicles). If someone had neon lights on their vehicle, (LED's were not around then), as long as they would not me mistaken for emergency lights, no problem. It was pretty common sense to me, but everyone is different.
 

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Most cops will not pull you over for things on your bike alone, but they will pull you over for doing something dumb. Then depending on your attitude/ the mood the cop is in... you may or may not get a ticket for the things on your bike that are illegal.

That being said, Ive had a few fix it tickets for where my plate is located.
 

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Never been stopped or for that matter got more than a quick glance from a cop. Dont do anything stupid and your good to go. If you get pulled over and you havent done wrong then im sure theres probably a good reason for it ie. license plate not visible enough or whatever other reason. Just dont be quick to think the cops just being a **** if you get stopped.
 

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Moto GSpizzle
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as long as your mods are not all crazy and stand out.. you should be fine.. i heard in California if u dont have license plate lights.. you bike can get impounded? is this true>?
we had a crack down on people not having plates this year in bako. all they did was write fix-it tickets. they did impound anyones bike who didnt have a license though.
 

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Moto GSpizzle
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hey. so i have a question. i just got a new 600rr. if i put all the mods on it (fender eliminator, flush side lights, exhaust, HIDs, etc), being that theyre mostly illegal or not DOT approved, what are the chances that ill get pulled over because of them? anyone know or ever gotten "caught" for theyre mods? would cops make a big deal?
as long as you dont get an attitude you should be good.
ive got flush mounts, Red LEDs, and no plate right now. ive been followed home a few times but not stopped yet
 

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i think most cops are just stupid. they couldnt tell. id just say hey, i bought the bike from the dealer like this. its how they come. but then this is pa cops. they only harass u if u harass them
 

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we had a crack down on people not having plates this year in bako. all they did was write fix-it tickets. they did impound anyones bike who didnt have a license though.
shoot they had a crack down on bike since everyone start to buy them when gas start to go up.. i heard they even stop you if u had a bike on the bed of your truck to make sure it wasnt stolen

no license? but permit is ok right?
 

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Moto GSpizzle
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shoot they had a crack down on bike since everyone start to buy them when gas start to go up.. i heard they even stop you if u had a bike on the bed of your truck to make sure it wasnt stolen

no license? but permit is ok right?
make sure you dont have a passenger, not on the freeway or out when the street lights are on
 

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The only thing LEO's would get you for usually is the FE or improper tag mount. I've gotten pulled over for that a few times but gotten away with warnings only. They'll also crack down if you have blue or red led lights.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
hm. cool. now i dont really have worries. haha. thanks. you know, if i get HID's, are they gonna get me a ticket? lets say i just wanted the 6000-8000k (white to blue-ish white). any trouble?
 

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The only thing LEO's would get you for usually is the FE or improper tag mount. I've gotten pulled over for that a few times but gotten away with warnings only. They'll also crack down if you have blue or red led lights.
I always gave warnings the first time on tags, (small town). Never messed with anyone for neons, (No LED's back then). as long as they didn't have blue or red light facing toward the front and could be mistaken for an emergency vehicle, (very rare).

You have to help them out on the tag thing. Motorcycle tags are hard to read from behind to begin with, and you don't want to tailgate a bike with a Crown Vic. If you can't read it from a couple of car lengths back, (and you can't even come close when they are mounted in front of the back wheel), expect to get stopped. Like I said, you want your officers to catch bike thieves and you cant expect then to do so if you are an ass in how your tag is mounted. It's pretty easy to fab a mount that gets rid of the ugly stock tail and still have it visible.
 

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^^^ I don't understand you cops. Not to be disrespectful or anything but I think most of you guys have a weird way of thinking. When it comes to pulling people over, use your brains... If you pull a guy over because his tag is not visible, don't say he did it because he wanted to hide his identity, or RUN. That wouldn't make any sense because he pulled over which should make it obvious that running wasn't his intent. Also, instead of riding down the street squinting your eyes trying to read a motorcycles tag watch the cars and all of the millions of dumbass car drivers that put our lives in real danger instead of giving meaningless tickets to motorcyclist.

Photog927-- It really depends on the cop. I'm always polite when I get pulled over, sometimes I've gotten warnings and sometimes $500 tickets. All depends on the cop and what kind of mood hes in, which is why I don't like them...
 

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^^^ I don't understand you cops. Not to be disrespectful or anything but I think most of you guys have a weird way of thinking. When it comes to pulling people over, use your brains... If you pull a guy over because his tag is not visible, don't say he did it because he wanted to hide his identity, or RUN. That wouldn't make any sense because he pulled over which should make it obvious that running wasn't his intent. Also, instead of riding down the street squinting your eyes trying to read a motorcycles tag watch the cars and all of the millions of dumbass car drivers that put our lives in real danger instead of giving meaningless tickets to motorcyclist.

Photog927-- It really depends on the cop. I'm always polite when I get pulled over, sometimes I've gotten warnings and sometimes $500 tickets. All depends on the cop and what kind of mood hes in, which is why I don't like them...
I don't do the job anymore, but what is so strange about it? Do you know why the tag is there in the first place? If you do, why would you fault an officer for stopping you when you have rendered it useless.:tard:

For the record, I probably made 100 vehicle stops on cars for every one on a bike and wrote very few tickets. I never said anything about someone running and didn't pursue if they did. Like I said, it was a small town and I usually had a good idea who it was.

Use some common sense and mount your plate where it is visible. It will save you trouble in the long run and make your bike easier to find if it is stolen.
 

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This is a long read, but here it goes anyways:

It's a suburban neighborhood, on Sunday morning. There is a three-way stop at which hardly anyone ever goes the other direction than the main one. But you often see a police car in the nearby parking lot, keeping his sharp eye out for evil lawbreakers. These are the dangerous criminals who slow down almost to a full stop that causes the car to shift back the other direction, but don't quite do this. Instead they do what is sometimes called a "rolling stop" which stops short of full immobilization.The policeman in the car regards this as "running a stop sign," as if you paid no attention to it at all, and he'll give you a ticket whenever he catches you doing it.

From the policeman's point of view, it's like shooting fish in a barrel. One recent empirical accounting at this intersection (I dragooned some neighborhood kids into keeping count) observed that more than 9 in 10 people do not come to what the law regards as a "full stop."

I should know about this because, try as I might to be a law-abiding citizen, I have now received my fifth ticket this year at this very intersection one block from my house. That's not a typo. Five! I know it sounds crazy — why the heck can't I obey those who are ordained to keep me safe? — but when you consider that I go through this intersection several times per day, I'm actually doing rather well.

It goes without saying that this is a racket. The city is many hundreds of dollars richer because of my penchant for law breaking alone, and probably hundreds of thousands richer if you include everyone else's.

But it wasn't until someone drew my attention to this link that I understood the full extent of what this whole racket is about. Yes, it's about money. But there is more to it than that. You see, it turns out that I'm an archetype, a person who rolls through stop signs in my safe neighborhood and then gets outraged when the ticket is issued and attempts to "fight authority" rather than pay up. So, fool that I am, I actually believe in "challenging the system." I take seriously the claim that I'm innocent until proven guilty. Can you believe the naïveté?

It's typical of suburbanites. We challenge tickets, especially frivolous ones. And this, it turns out, is precisely what the police want us to do, for reasons explained below.

So on the appointed court day, I leave the office to go to the courthouse to fight this ridiculous ticket. I sit for hours and hours until I'm given a chance to declare my innocence. All the while, the cop who stopped me stands at the back of the courtroom with his arms folded over his bulletproof chest. He is heavily armed. I, on the other hand, was searched before I even walked in.

If at this point I declare my innocence, I am given the opportunity for a trial with my own attorney, whom I must pay because I'm not poor enough to have the court appoint a lawyer even if I wanted it to. This trial is scheduled for sometime in the future, which means another trip to the courthouse, and another opportunity for the cop to enjoy the air-conditioned surroundings of the courtroom he rules. What chance is there for me? In the end, I would probably have to declare myself guilty of something or other, and pay a lesser fine; meanwhile I will have missed at least two days of work.

What's going on here turns out to do with the way policemen are paid. According to federal labor law, they are only allowed to be scheduled for patrolling up to 40 hours per week, just as the rest of us can only be scheduled to work up to a certain number of hours. Courtroom time — and by subpoena, they have to be there — often counts as overtime, meaning 50% more than they are paid for patrolling during regular hours.

In the case examined by John Stossel on 20/20, a policeman named Officer Kanapsky made an additional $21,562 over his regular pay just by standing around in court. The more tickets he issued, especially for minor issues that outraged people are likely to challenge in court, the more money he made. This is a result of labor law. As the Department of Labor says, "An employer who requires or permits an employee to work overtime is generally required to pay the employee premium pay for such overtime work."

Now, it starts to make sense.You and I — his employers, so to speak — are paying a premium for his court time, which is why he spends his patrolling time trying to goad people into going to court. The policeman is being paid time and a half to waste our time and to cause our insurance rates to rise.

In the private sector, the permission to work more than 40 hours per week is a real benefit to the employee and the employer, though the terms ought to be left to the contracting parties. But in the police work, this overtime permission results in a scam that causes police to engage in low-risk, high-revenue earning activities that exploit the population.

It occurs to everyone who is given a frivolous ticket: surely the cop's time would be better spent stopping real crimes, not harassing nonthreatening citizens. Now we can better see why they do this. It may be a product of federal overtime rules, another case in which the ghost of FDR haunts us every day.

But what to do about it? Denounce the cop on the spot? That's not a good idea. It strikes you immediately when you are stopped by a policeman that there is a huge disparity of power at work here. You are effectively captured by them. You must comply no matter what. They have the legal right to use any method to keep you quiet and docile and to punish you to the point of death if you resist.

YouTube is filled with clips showing people being subjected to the latest weapon of choice: the taser gun. The police love the taser gun. It leaves no trace of physical injury. You are shot through with electricity, which causes frightening physical and mental convulsions, but there is nothing you can take a picture of. No bruises. No wounds. No broken bones. This is all the better for them — and all the worse for you.

Never forget what happens to you if you decide to run instead. That's a death sentence. Forget that the instinct to evade your captors is universal and deeply embedded in our mental/biological equipment. The state operates on the assumption that you are its slave when it wants you to be, and otherwise free in name only. This is especially true in the age of Bush, in which all police at all levels have morphed into militarized "security personnel." The friendly, helpful policeman of old civics texts seems to be a thing of the past.

In any case, the phenomenon of Officer Kanapsky raises fundamental questions not only about federal labor law but also about the role of the police in any community. Do they really stop crime? Sure, they arrive after a crime has been committed; they take fingerprints (those only seem to work in the movies) and file reports. In real life, however, crime prevention is due to the private sector: locks, alarm systems, and the like.This is what prevents crimes from taking place.

The police aren't so hot at prosecuting crime either, but for people who commit crimes like slowing down at three-way stops. Yet we are all somehow under the illusion that the police are the reason we are safe. It is the core mythology of our civic religion.
The Enterprise of Law

$25 $15

If you do believe that they do more good than harm, consider the unseen costs. What kind of private alternatives are being crowded out by the very presence of the police?

It is also deeply troubling that most people believe there aren't too many police but too few. How many are too many? What if one in three people were a cop? One in two? Maybe we should have two cops for every one civilian. How safe we would be! Really, there is an ethos in this country that you can never have too many cops on the street, and the idea of hiring more nearly always garners public support.

And yet, when it comes right down to it on the particulars, we can't stand the police. We keep a constant lookout for them when we drive. We dread being pulled over. We know in our hearts that they are out to get us, and represent more of a threat than a security for our freedoms.

In the end, we need to realize that the police are like all other government employees: self-interested, living off tax dollars, parasitical on our liberties. The case of Officer Kanapsky shows precisely how and why.

From http://mises.org/story/3092
 
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