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Discussion Starter #1
I have had my bike for about a month now and have taken it out maybe 10 times. (This is my first bike) Its been about a week since I have rode it so I was itching to take it out this weekend. It was 35F this morning so it was a cold ride.

I was heading down a semi-residential street at 35mph (the speed limit) and came over a hill. A car was coming from my right and started to run the stop sign turning right into my path. The driver saw me and stopped leaving about 3/4 of his car in my path. I locked up my back tire and fishtailed back and forth a couple times. Luckily the car stopped so I could release the brake and everything straightened and I rode on.

Scary as hell for me.

I learned through this near miss and reading the boards:
1. need to check your tire pressure as the temperature changes throughout the year to ensure proper traction

2. even with proper pressure at a minimum your tires will take longer to heat up during the cold months and you will likely have reduced traction throughout your ride during cold months

3. don't delay making your gear purchases and gear up for every ride. I would have been in bad shape if I went down -- my gloves (ski), shoes (running), and pants (jeans) would have not protected me the way I would have wanted them too.

4. research braking - there are many opinions/strategies on how to use your front and rear brakes. Stomping down on your rear brake to evade an accident is not one of the strategies. Newbs need to practice stopping probably more than they need to practice going. Especially stopping quickly to avoid bad situations.

5. this is a very dangerous time of the year on the road with all of the knuckleheads running around with their to do and gift lists. Drivers are more distracted this month than any other time of the year.

Feel free to add to my list

--- Be safe everyone ---
 

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Happy to read the safe outcome to this thread be safe out there
 

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I was not there, so I cannot say for sure. But to me it sounds like you should have used a swerve more than emergency braking. In most scenarios, you are not going to be able to stop in time with braking alone in order to avoid hitting an obstacle that end up in front of you one way or another. These bikes are incredibly nimble and can turn on a dime. Use that to swerve around vehicles that come into your path. Make sure to never "target fixate"; meaning don't focus on the car that pulled out in front of you, look around the car for a path to avoid a possible collision.

Glad that you made it out in one piece and I'm glad that you are learning from it. Definitely practice your emergency braking as well.
 

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When I first started riding I learned very quickly that a motorcycle does not stop on a dime, like I use to think before I became a rider. I didn't lock up the tires but I was suprise at how much distance I needed to make a full stop. Almost as much as my car.
 

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Glad you made it through without a get off! :banger:

So you locked the rear, did you also use the front brake? About 80% of your stopping power is in the front, the rear is not going to be a lot of help in an emergency braking situation. Practice threshold braking in a safe place, A LOT. You want to be able to get the most out of your brakes without thinking about it because this won't be the last time you have this happen.

Like someone said, think evasion if possible. Don't count on stopping power. ALWAYS have an escape route in mind even if there isn't an immediate threat.

Wear that gear! You are going to really hate yourself if you have a simple fall and end up ripping 6 inches of skin off your knees or breaking something you would rather not have broken.
 

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good to hear you came away unscathed mate. them damn cagers don't give a **** sometimes. i just had to go on a speed awareness course yesterday to avoid getting points on my license as i'D previously been caught speeding. but a lot of the stuff they cover is about scanning the road a lot further away up the road than normal and anticipating potential hazzards that could imerge, never presume a car/pedestrian/animal is going to do anything. sounds like you didn't have much of a chance coming over a hill like but.. also like a guy above mentioned think of escape routes too as most times stopping power mightn't get you out of a situation, as by the time you have reacted wich takes a second or so you've already travelled a fair distance before applying the brakes. glad to hear your ok tho.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Glad you made it through without a get off! :banger:

So you locked the rear, did you also use the front brake? About 80% of your stopping power is in the front, the rear is not going to be a lot of help in an emergency braking situation. Practice threshold braking in a safe place, A LOT. You want to be able to get the most out of your brakes without thinking about it because this won't be the last time you have this happen.

Like someone said, think evasion if possible. Don't count on stopping power. ALWAYS have an escape route in mind even if there isn't an immediate threat.

Wear that gear! You are going to really hate yourself if you have a simple fall and end up ripping 6 inches of skin off your knees or breaking something you would rather not have broken.
I am not sure if I even grabbed the front break. I definitely had room to go around the car though and evasion would have been a better approach looking back.
 

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Glad you came out well, its always nicer to read about a close call than an accident!

Good list, but I would like to make a couple of comments and a slight reordering...

...
I learned through this near miss and reading the boards:

1. don't delay making your gear purchases and gear up for every ride. I would have been in bad shape if I went down -- my gloves (ski), shoes (running), and pants (jeans) would have not protected me the way I would have wanted them too.This is number one IMO, doesn't matter how good of a rider you are sometimes sh*t happens and you will always be better off in full gear

2. research braking - there are many opinions/strategies on how to use your front and rear brakes. Stomping down on your rear brake to evade an accident is not one of the strategies. Newbs need to practice stopping probably more than they need to practice going. Especially stopping quickly to avoid bad situations.Advanced rider courses will help with this, and practice in all conditions - no good being the king of braking in the dry when the first time you need to its pouring down rain!

3. need to check your tire pressure as the temperature changes throughout the year to ensure proper traction It's a good idea to check every week even if the temp doesn't change because things like the bead and valve can leak not to mention punctures from road debris

4. even with proper pressure at a minimum your tires will take longer to heat up during the cold months and you will likely have reduced traction throughout your ride during cold monthsIt will take longer yes, however the difference is not likely to be that significant and your tyres will almost certainly be up to temp within a handful of miles from home (less than 5ish) and the cold in itself wont reduce your traction but things like the painted lines, water and ice definitely will

5. this is a very dangerous time of the year on the road with all of the knuckleheads running around with their to do and gift lists. Drivers are more distracted this month than any other time of the year.Good point, this had never even occurred to me!

Feel free to add to my list

--- Be safe everyone ---
 

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+1 on the evasion. Even with a lot of experience under my belt I picked braking over evasion on a highway accident and picking the latter would have definitely saved my ass. Panic breaking at 75 mph on worn Supercorsas sucks, and trying to evade only after locking up both tires is not quite as effective.

Re: temperature. I have heard several people state that temp only effects PSIs and doesn't really affect traction as your tire is warmed up after a few miles of riding. This doesn't match my experience AT ALL. Some tires seem to be particularly bad. I had BattleAxe touring tires on my 900rr and they were a bitch when cold (FL winter at 40 degrees). I could spin in 3rd gear and the tires were real greasy at deep lean angles. But that tire is a very hard compound as I got close to 8k miles on the back.

D208s seemed to be much better in the cold and all around and is what most of my riding has been on.

My current wheels are Bridgestone BT012s on my 600rr and they are slick as hell in the cold as well. 30 degree weather here in Belgium and the back tire will spin in 1st and 2nd (for example if you try a little power wheelie) even after riding for 10-15 minutes on city streets. Tire is also slick during these temps just stopping on dry pavement especially cobblestones.

Beyond that I agree with your points especially gear. Gear has saved my ass more then once. Nothing cements that feeling more then getting off without gear, and then getting off with gear and being amazed at how much better you fair.
 

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Nice to see you came out unhurt and without damage on this one. Good to see that you've identified a few things to do differently next time.

As LanCo Rider said, swerving (if there's room) is sometimes more effective than an emergency stop.
 

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3. don't delay making your gear purchases and gear up for every ride. I would have been in bad shape if I went down -- my gloves (ski), shoes (running), and pants (jeans) would have not protected me the way I would have wanted them too.
How the hell did you not freeze?? I ride every weekday to work, and for the past few weeks it's been <40F every morning. I have to put on two "long-johns" under my work pants (plus my knee/shin protectors and boots) and wear a thermal shirt, work shirt, sweater, then leather MC jacket so I don't go into hypothermia while riding!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
How the hell did you not freeze?? I ride every weekday to work, and for the past few weeks it's been <40F every morning. I have to put on two "long-johns" under my work pants (plus my knee/shin protectors and boots) and wear a thermal shirt, work shirt, sweater, then leather MC jacket so I don't go into hypothermia while riding!
It was cold which is why I had on ski gloves rather than my A-star leather gloves. I also had on long johns under my jeans, a polypropylene shirt, another shirt, a leather jacket with liner, and a neck warmer. Now that I think about it....maybe I was a little stiff too....like that kid on the movie Christmas Story. I rode for about an hour and my feet were the only things really cold. Its just hard to look at the bike everyday and not go ride it.
 

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It was cold which is why I had on ski gloves rather than my A-star leather gloves. I also had on long johns under my jeans, a polypropylene shirt, another shirt, a leather jacket with liner, and a neck warmer. Now that I think about it....maybe I was a little stiff too....like that kid on the movie Christmas Story. I rode for about an hour and my feet were the only things really cold. Its just hard to look at the bike everyday and not go ride it.
Yup I wear my ski gloves too. I'm actually thinking about putting my armored MC gloves under the ski gloves since the ski gloves are kind of big and the MC gloves fit just right.
 

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Ride like they don't see you, because 95% of the time, they don't.
 

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glad you made it out safely....i've been in that situation a couple times. 12sec rule is always good to do. always think of an out....:gun1:
 
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