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I’ve never really rode aggressively in cold weather (below 45), mostly just going to and from work or school every once and a while. My question is, how big of a role does cold pavement play in traction? I know cold tires + cold pavement = not good, but if you warm your tires properly, how much will the cold pavement affect you? Also, what are some good techniques in warming your tires up on cold days? I usually just start out slow and kind of weave back and forth in my lane to help warm the tires up a little. Then slowly increase my speed through every turn. One last question…I was thinking if you warm your tires up going through turns, and then hit a long road or highway, do your tires cool down again? I mean you aren’t using the sides of your tires anymore and I was wondering if the get cold again? I’m sorry if you think some of these questions are stupid, but I’ve read a few threads in the crash section about people sliding out on cold pavement + tires and I just want to be careful. Thanks!!
 

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Your tires take forever to warm up, and even then theyre just barely warm.
Ride around for half an hour in that cold, then jump off and feel the tire, especially the side, then do the same thing the next time you get a days where its around 60 degree.

You'll be liek damn, im not leaning over in the cold again. Trust me, thats what got me, cold tires are a b1tch.
 

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Oh and it has been proven that weaving back and forth does not warm the tires faster.
 

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I still do it. But in this cold, i dont trust nothing. So i still lean easily. I refuse to drop my 1000 because of cold tires, like i did my 600
 

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Street tires can be brought up to temp, but it will take much longer and probably more aggressive riding than most people do in the winter time. But if it's cold enough it maybe impossible for you to get enough heat into the tires to get them up to temp, especially riding on the street. Not to mention it may take constant abuse to keep them hot enough for traction, another thing kinda hard to do on the street. My advice is to remove as many variatables as you can, and keep the twisties to warmer weather.
And yes, the sides can and will cool off if you're not using them.
 

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^ Thats exactly what i do, im just chilling till spring rolls around. Pretty much anything above 60 degrees you can get good heat in for good traction below that, i just chill yow.
 

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Yah cold tires suck ass. i just about lost mine one day due to the back sliding and i didnt realize it till it was almost sideways on me. thank god my front tire didn't lock up or i would have been screwed and very pissed off.
 

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i've been wondering something similar for a while. in about 60-80 degrees how long does it take to warm the tires up. I ride pseudo aggressive but not really right when i start out. just wondering when there actually warm. once warm how long do they stay that way? i.e. if you get off for lunch
 

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It varies dude, it depends on you riding style, tire pressure, and road surface, No one can give you a set answer for that. Thats something you have to determine by feel of the bike, or maybe touching it at a stoplight to see if its got some heat in them.
 

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Too many variables to give an exact figure. To play it safe I usually give myself several miles, and then gradually increase lean angle and throttle. You have to listen to what your tires are telling you, they will let you know when they're up to temp. You just have to keep in mind flying down the highway at 65 might heat up the center, but chances are the edges may not be. Also rapid/hard braking/acceleration will aid in warming tires.
For example when I was last at Summit main. After sitting out for 40 minutes I would tear down the front straight right out of pit-in balls to the walls (gaining heat). Brake fairly hard (but not too hard because front tire is still cool) and take T1 at a moderate lean angle (but hardly any throttle out). Continue through any straights wide open and taking each corner progressively deeper for the entire first lap. With cooler tires you can have either lean angle, or throttle, but not both... save that for when they're up to temp. Lap two I add throttle and by the end of lap two there's no holding back. Each lap is 2.1 miles, 10 turns and this was about 50 degrees.
 

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Just be safe!!

Hey all I can tell you is that there is no way you should be cornering like you do in the warmer months. Just be safe and save it for summer. Here in town there was a rider who went out on a cold day and was hauling ass and bit into a guardrail and did not make it... DONT BE THAT GUY!! Not That one!!!.
 

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weaving back and forth is worth crap for heating up your tires. The best way to heat them is heavy acceleration and braking. And although putting your hand on your tire to feel the temp CAN give you a gauge of the tire temp, its not the best way to tell. Hitting a few corners can allow you to heat the surface of the tire, but the carcass and the air inside may still not be up to temp.

Tire pressure plays a huge roll in cold weather traction. Taking out a couple psi of pressure can help your tires warm up a little faster. I know the manuals recommend something like 35psi...which is crazy, I dont even use that in the summer, not enough feel. For street tires I usually run 32f and 30r...which is the lowest I would probably recommend (I run michelin PP on the street).

But, like everyone said, in the winter its unlikely that the tires will heat up to regular operating temps since the surface is so cold. Those of us that hit the track no all-to-well that it takes a few sessions for the race line to heat up, depending on how many people are on the track that day.

Unless you're riding in circles all day on the street...there's no way the surface is going to heat up and provide enough grip for you. So, no matter how warm you think your tires are...make sure that you ride less aggressively in the winter
 

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Its probably already been said, but I know from experience that you can ride for hours and your tires will still slide on the cold pavement. For me, if its 55 or colder, I just assume Im gonna slide and take it easy.
 

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The best way is as Jahmic said, you just have to feel what ypour tires are doing. Ive had the tires warm to the hand but just not feeling ready when turning. if ive been going non-stop for a while and its in the high 50s, it usually starts to feel right. But if you gradually lean into it you can feel when its right. BUt ive had the middle nice and hot and the sides cold as ice before.
 

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Thats VIR, im not trying to day that at the track at all, but yes, lower tires pressure will create more friction.
 
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