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Hello all fellow .net members! I've just been kicking around the idea of making an exhaust for my bike. Now, it has a full yoshi on it right now and all I would make would be the slip on part but I was just wanting some of your opinions. I've been kicking around a few different styles of what I would wanna do but not for certain yet. What are some of the cons of doing this? Any insight would be greatly appreciated! Thanks everyone!
 

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Start with the stock exhaust. Is it chambered? Cut it open and see. Remove a chamber and reweld. Slip it on over your Yoshi headers and fire it up.
 

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I haven't been sure which can I want to use on my bike yet. I just picked up a set of headers and mid pipe from Hindle and was wondering what to do in the meantime. What I came up with was to try and mate the stock muffler with the Hindle mid-pipe. I had a look at the muffler and found that the resonator started behind the muffler where the pipe changes diameter. When I cut the pipe just up-line from that point I found that the perforated pipe outer diameter was almost identical to the mid-pipe inner diameter. So I cut the two pipes so there would be about 1 1/2" of overlap and worked the two pieces of pipe together. Using a pipe clamp and the baffle material as a seal, it worked perfectly.



 

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Start with the stock exhaust. Is it chambered? Cut it open and see. Remove a chamber and reweld. Slip it on over your Yoshi headers and fire it up.
Not worth it. I got an extra stock exhaust with my bike (I don't know why either) & cut it open more out of curiosity than wanting to do anything with it. It is chambered. Three chambers if I remember. The two inner walls that section it into 3 chambers are welded in. You'd have to cut the can open, cut out the baffle walls, weld in a core, then weld the whole thing shut and end up with a really heavy frankenstein can.

You also can't really cut the can off and then use another home made slip on to mate with the stock mid pipe. It doesn't center so your slip on would be way off center. Oh, yeah, the OEM mid pipe is also really heavy compared to the aftermarket ones.

The OEM exhausts were made to be tough enough to last the life of the bike & meet noise regulations. You may be able to core it to make it louder but that's about all you'll get out of the effort.

The stock can is interesting. Description if you're curios. It's like a car exhaust. A length of the mid pipe is cored with maybe 2mm of batting to start to slow the gasses a little. the first chamber has two ports, a small open one that connects to the exit chamber (third) via a core passing through the second chamber. The second port has a valve that's sprung closed. With enough pressure into the first chamber it overcomes the spring tension & opens the valve into the second chamber that has another large port into the third chamber. The third chamber as you would guess is the exit chamber that has the exhaust outlet. At low revs it's very restricted and quiet. At higher revs you get both paths to the exit chamber that allows more flow. Still quite restricted compared to an open race can but if you look up the theory on those types of exhausts the chambers are also tuned to reduce noise by resonating back to cancel certain frequencies. Very smart but not interesting for our purposes.
 

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Not worth it. I got an extra stock exhaust with my bike (I don't know why either) & cut it open more out of curiosity than wanting to do anything with it. It is chambered. Three chambers if I remember. The two inner walls that section it into 3 chambers are welded in. You'd have to cut the can open, cut out the baffle walls, weld in a core, then weld the whole thing shut and end up with a really heavy frankenstein can.

You also can't really cut the can off and then use another home made slip on to mate with the stock mid pipe. It doesn't center so your slip on would be way off center. Oh, yeah, the OEM mid pipe is also really heavy compared to the aftermarket ones.

The OEM exhausts were made to be tough enough to last the life of the bike & meet noise regulations. You may be able to core it to make it louder but that's about all you'll get out of the effort.

The stock can is interesting. Description if you're curios. It's like a car exhaust. A length of the mid pipe is cored with maybe 2mm of batting to start to slow the gasses a little. the first chamber has two ports, a small open one that connects to the exit chamber (third) via a core passing through the second chamber. The second port has a valve that's sprung closed. With enough pressure into the first chamber it overcomes the spring tension & opens the valve into the second chamber that has another large port into the third chamber. The third chamber as you would guess is the exit chamber that has the exhaust outlet. At low revs it's very restricted and quiet. At higher revs you get both paths to the exit chamber that allows more flow. Still quite restricted compared to an open race can but if you look up the theory on those types of exhausts the chambers are also tuned to reduce noise by resonating back to cancel certain frequencies. Very smart but not interesting for our purposes.
This gets the award for the most informative post of the day. Well said.
 
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