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what an amazing event to watch. I wish I could have seen it in person. and last I heard it was going 16,000 MPH. only the yellow RR's can go that fast :) haha
 

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I did, watched it online live, though nothing beats it in person, haha, you think GP is cool
 

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its nice to see nasa back in action,
the black RR will go that fast when the moon is out. lol
 

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EvilRider said:
I missed it :-( I would love to see a launch in person. I can only imagine the rush the astronauts get getting launched at those speeds.
Actually the shuttle is very tame compared to previous rockets. The G forces experienced on a shuttle launch are around 3.5, whereas the saturn 5 was over 7.

I used to live 23 miles from the launchpad, and believe it or not you do get bored with it. However the nighttime launches are a real sight to behold, as it becomes daylight out for around 45 seconds, it's just eerily beautiful.
 

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Steelgrave said:
Actually the shuttle is very tame compared to previous rockets. The G forces experienced on a shuttle launch are around 3.5, whereas the saturn 5 was over 7.

I used to live 23 miles from the launchpad, and believe it or not you do get bored with it. However the nighttime launches are a real sight to behold, as it becomes daylight out for around 45 seconds, it's just eerily beautiful.
3.5Gs...? it is a wee bit more than that. i believe it is on the order of 12+. part of the reason the astronauts are launched horizontally. you can take much more force directly thru the chest as opposed to through the top or bottom of your head. pretty much grew up on NASA/Langley in VA. prove me wrong, i could be, but i'm 95% sure it's a whole lot of G's.
 

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G-force
Force experienced by a pilot or astronaut when the craft in which he or she is travelling accelerates or decelerates rapidly. The unit g denotes the acceleration due to gravity, where 1 g is the ordinary pull of gravity.

Early astronauts were subjected to launch and re-entry forces of up to 6 g or more; in the space shuttle, more than 3 g is experienced on lift-off. Pilots and astronauts wear g-suits that prevent their blood pooling too much under severe g-forces, which can lead to unconsciousness.



Did a Google search and a lot of articles stated 3 to 4 G's for a space shuttle launch.

From another source:

A typical person can handle about 5 g (50 m/s²) before blackout occurs, but through the combination of special g-suits and efforts to strain muscles —both of which act to force blood back into the brain— modern pilots can typically handle 9 g (90 m/s²).
 
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