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Discussion Starter #1
I thought I would post a DIY for Custom Gauges. I did mine with blue and UV LEDs. It can all be done with 3mm LEDs.

Supplies:

16 3mm LEDs of colour choice
soldering iron
desoldering iron
solder
flux
small phillips screwdriver
med phillips screwdriver
pliers or forceps
sturdy scissors
utility knife
small butane torch or lighter

Begin by removing gauge cluster from the bike. I won't outline these steps in great detail but you do need to remove the front cowl to do it. Once removed and at your work area turn the gauge cluster over. On the back are 7 screws that need to be removed to detach the front cover (circled yellow).


To remove the circuit board from the back cover of the gauge cluster you need to remove this screw (circled orange).


For orientation sake, the back of the circuit board has the connector for the wiring harness. It can become confusing once the gauge face/tach and the digital displays are removed.

Next you need to remove the gauge face/tach assembly from the circuit board. In order to do this you need to removed the 5 screws that hold it to the board (circled red), desolder the 4 contacts for the tach and the oil and shift LEDs (circled yellow), and unbend the 4 tabs that hold the tach to the board with pliers (circled green).


Here is a little closer detail on the parts to desolder and the tabs to unbend.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
The gauge face/tach assembly should come right off now. Place it to the side as we will deal with it more later.

These next two steps are optional as you can leave the digital displays alone if you like. The OEM lighting on these is amber but it can be changed if you like. There are 3 LEDs for the speedo display and 2 for the gas gauge display.

To remove the speedo display you need to straighten the 5 bent tabs on the back of the circuit board (circled red). Once done, the display comes off the board without the need for desoldering. Try not to touch the contacts on the display or the circuit board as this may interfere with conduction.


To remove the gas gauge display you need to remove the 4 screws (circled purple) and desolder the row of contacts (circled yellow). The gas display should lift off no problem as long as you desolder adequately. There is some goop over the contacts that need desoldering so either remove it with some kind of solvent or just do what I did and suck it up with the desoldering iron along with the solder.


At this point all the LEDs you want to replace should be accessible and you can see them all once the board is turned back over to view the front. There are 2 signal LEDs (circled green), 1 high beam LED (circled blue), 1 neutral light LED (circled yellow), 10 LEDs that give the colour to the tach needle and the digital displays (circled red), and the oil light and shift light LED locations (circled white)((these were already removed to get the gauge face/tach off the board and are still in the gauge face which is set off to the side for now)). I don't have a picture with the digital displays removed but the LEDs approximate location is circled. They are the square type LEDs as well. All the LEDs on the board except the oil and shift lights are the square flat white type. In the below picture there are standard LEDs in the picture but it was taken after I had started soldering the new LEDs on.


To remove the square LEDs you just grab with pliers and heat the solder on each side to remove it. Once done you can sort out what colours you want for your LEDs. Picture below is what it looks like with the square LED removed and a new 3mm LED soldered on (both circled green).
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Now, LEDs work in one direction. The wires on them are different lengths. The long wire is positive and the short negative. Also when looking straight down on the LED you will notice it has a flat part on the side of the negative wire. This is important to note because you will be cutting the wires and if you loose track of which side is what this will let you know. The circuit board has some nifty little clues as to which side each wire of the LED should be soldered to. On each LED location except the oil and shift LED locations there are an A and a K (circled yellow). The A is one side and the K is the other. The A is the positive side (or anode side A=anode) and the K is the negative side (or cathode side K=cathode).

The orientation for the two LEDs for the oil and shift lights is marked right on the board, you can see outline of the LED including the flat side mentioned before which is the negative wire or short wire (circled yellow).



Next we can start soldering the LEDs for the signals, high beam and neutral. The wires can be trimmed to about 1/4 inch on these. There is more room for these 4 LEDs than the others so the length isn't as crucial. Although hard to see well in the below picture you can see the height of the LEDs for the signals, high beam and neutral light is more than the rest of the LEDs on the board. All visible are circled.


The LEDs for the digital displays are mounted a little differently. The 3 for the speedo are trimmed between 1/8 and 1/4 inches but need to be soldered almost lying flat to fit under the plastic cover. The 2 LEDs for the gas gauge need to be flat against the circuit board as well but the way they are oriented on the board means you need to trim the wires unequal lengths in order to acheive this. Unfortunately I never took photos at this stage to show you visually but hopefully you get the idea. Once these are attached you can check clearance and reconnect the two digital displays and solder the connections to the gas gauge display.

The rest of the LEDs that fit under the gauge face/tach need to have the wires cut as short as possible but allowing enough room to solder them to the board, probably 1/8 inch or a little less. These need to point straight up to ensure illumination of the tach needle and numbers on the tach dial. Once all new LEDs are attached aside from the shift and oil lights its time to move onto the removed gauge face/tach assembly that we set aside earlier. Refer to the below diagram to see which LEDs need to be cut short to fit under the gauge face/tach assembly. The LEDs that need to be short lie around the tach module (circled green). The signals, high beam, neutral lights can be a little longer (circled red). The LEDs under the digital displays need to lie flat (approximate locations circled yellow).
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Moving onto the gauge face/tach assembly. Some modification needs to be done to this to allow clearance for the new LEDs under the assembly. On the back of it is a clear plastic bracket which has posts for mounting it onto the circuit board and also 4 small peaked pieces of plastic. These sit directly above the LEDs under the assembly and capture and diffuse the light so it illuminates the dial and the needle. These need to be cut short to allow the clearance needed. I used a small butane torch to heat a utility knife and sliced through them. This allowed the cut plastic to still keep some of its clarity to allow the light through. Another step is to remove the two LEDs for the oil and shift lights. To do this you need to remove the two screws from the gauge face on either side of the needle (see below picture). Once that is done you can rotate the gauge face around on the base so the indicated opening will allow you to pull the LEDs out of the holders (screws circled blue, opening indicated in green, LEDs circled pink). Make sure you leave the black holders where they are and only take the LEDs out. Once they are removed you can screw the gauge face back onto the base. If you happen to move the tach needle around, don't worry. Set it back against the pin on assembly. It resets itself each time the bike is started anyway.


At this point you can check the clearance of the LEDs by putting the gauge face/tach assembly back onto the board.

Before you go ahead and reattach the assembly you need to look at the two areas where the oil and shift LEDs go. You can see the way the LEDs should be oriented printed right on the circuit board. The flat side of the led should match the flat side of the diagram on the board (circled blue).


Now you can place the gauge face/tach assembly back on the circuit board making sure the connectors and the pins go through the appropriate holes. Replace the screws you removed earlier (red circles). Bend the tabs to secure it to the board (green circles). At this point you can drop new LEDs into the oil and shift light spots making sure they are the correct orientation as indicated on the board. The wires will protrude out the back of the board (to be trimmed later). Solder the 4 connectors for the tach module and the wires for the oil and shift LEDs (circled yellow). Trim the wires short after soldering them. An alternative method is to place the oil and shift LEDs in the holders prior to placing the gauge face/tach assembly back on the circuit board and then lining everything up while reattaching it. Either way worked for me.


Once everything is soldered and attached you place the reassembled circuit board into the back cover and replace the screw that attaches it to the back cover. Next attach the front cover with the 7 screws and voila, ready to test your handywork. Hopefully everything works well. If you want, you can test it before closing everything up. Place the front cowl in a position to hook up the blue and grey harnesses and then connect the gauge cluster. As soon as you turn the bike on all the lights should light and the tach needle will swing around. Good luck.


Short video added.
 

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Discussion Starter #8

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now you just have to figure out how to get rid of the hot spots on your speedo and gas gauge maybe by defusing the leds with a quick run trough a media blaster. but awsome write up ill be doing mine this winter. its been on the list for a while
 

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Discussion Starter #12
In person the LEDs aren't as bright and the hot spots not as noticable. In order to get the pictures I had to use a slow shutter speed which makes it look deceivingly bright. The displays are made with a diffuser but the way you have to angle the LEDs to enable them to fit makes it hard to optimize the effect of the diffuser.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I couldn't get the needle off. It must be glued and I didn't want to break it. Thats why I desoldered the tach from the board.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Yes you could but where is the fun in that? It costs quite a bit more too unless you need to buy everything like soldering iron and other supplies. All I needed was the LEDs. It only took a few hours instead of weeks waiting as well.
 

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Great write up but after all that, I am glad I had Blue Gauges do mine... Look's like a pain in the a$$.

Jason
 

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Just for future reference. The needle comes out, just pull, you will have to recalibrate it to make it set up in the right spot.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
I gave the needle a good tug but didn't want to pull too hard. I saw you had yours out on your post tripage. How do you recalibrate it once out?
 
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