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Discussion Starter #1
Today when i was doing my oil change i buttoned her all up and started her up. After idleing for a minute i revved her up a bit and the back tire started to move slowly then the more i revved her up the more the tire moved. Can any super gear heads explain that to me.
 

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I can't give you an exact reason why, but it's not uncommon both bikes that I have do the same thing, I think it has to do with you motor and transmission is always moving whether in gear or not so I think there is still some movement even in neutral
 

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Presuming that your bike was on a paddock stand, and that you had the clutch in while the bike was in gear - the reason that the tyre would move is that we have a wet clutch. Even though the clutch plates are spaced out (apart), shear stresses in the liquid transmit torque to the stationary plates causing them to move. This occurs when the plate on the engine side of the clutch starts spinning when you rev it up, and the oil adjacent to the plate is forced to move with that plate. Because the oil is 'thin', the two sets of plates will never reach the same speed.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
she was in neutral but i see what your sayin
 

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Thats weird then. Because if its in neutral, theres no mechanical connection through the gearbox between the engine and the rear wheel. So even if the transmission side of the clutch does spin slightly, the rear wheel shouldn't. Ok, so I don't have an explanation for you then...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
naa its balanced fine there new tires it was moving consistent to the revs of the motor. from what i know its pretty normal i was just making sure
 

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Both of my bikes do that while in neutral on a stand. I thinks it's normal, but I can't explain why.
 

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if the gear's are contacting each other, but the out put shaft's gear is not engaged, the input shaft turn's the corresponding gear on the out put shaft. the gear being turned is disengaged (not locked to the out put shaft), but it's moveing along on a roller bearing (while disengaged).


with no load on the rear tire (suspended on a stand), there is enough friction between these components and the oil to over come the weight of the chain and tire to make it spin.

if you watch it from when you first start the bike, you will noticed it's a gradual increase as it start's to spin. technicaly as the oil heat's up, the force should decrease. never watched it long enough to see though.

heres an animation; www.gadgetjq.com/transmission.htm. you can see the gear is not engaged but the teeth are still in contact. my bike does it, and manual trans. car's do it. i'd like to see if it would happen in a trans. that had anti friction coating(s) on the gears. T.K.
 
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if the gear's are contacting each other, but the out put shaft's gear is not engaged, the input shaft turn's the corresponding gear on the out put shaft. the gear being turned is disengaged (not locked to the out put shaft), but it's moveing along on a roller bearing (while disengaged).


with no load on the rear tire (suspended on a stand), there is enough friction between these components and the oil to over come the weight of the chain and tire to make it spin.

if you watch it from when you first start the bike, you will noticed it's a gradual increase as it start's to spin. technicaly as the oil heat's up, the force should decrease. never watched it long enough to see though.

heres an animation; www.gadgetjq.com/transmission.htm. you can see the gear is not engaged but the teeth are still in contact. my bike does it, and manual trans. car's do it. i'd like to see if it would happen in a trans. that had anti friction coating(s) on the gears. T.K.
how educational...!
 

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Nothing to worry about :D
I've explained it to a lot of customers over the years, always get the same reaction, "Oh. Cool."
 
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