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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
noticed this a while back but it seemed like it got a little worse a few days ago.

mostly with my back break but after i get home after a ride about 10 miles, my back brake rotor is really hot. i use my back and front brake almost the same amount and the back is alot hotter than the front. so not sure if my brake pads are dragging on the rotor. and when i roll the bike it feels normal and no kinks in the lines so im not sure why.

and for the front rotor, was like this since i bought it used 4k miles on it when i got it, but theres a spot when i can hear the pads skim the rotor just slightly, enough so i can hear it.

do i need new rotors or is it just the brake pads.
 

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I'm pretty sure the pads are supposed to have slight contact at all times. Not sure why the rear would be hotter than the front. maybe more air to the front cools them off better...just my worthless 2 cents.
 

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Unlike drum brakes, disc brakes have no springs pulling back on the pads. Pressure is applied behind the caliper pistons and pushes them out which pushed your pads into the rotor and making the bike stop. When you let off the brake lever, the only thing that pushes the pistons back into the caliper is the pressure from the brake pads on the rotor. The brake fluid does not suck the pistons back or anything. So the pads will always touch the rotor. (unless your rotor is bent, then it pushes the pistons in too much and gives you an inconsistant feel of your brake lever)

Rule of thumb, put your bike on a stand, and spin the wheel. Like the showcase showdown on the prices right, the wheel must go all the way around or it doesn't count. If you get one rev out of it, you're fine.
 

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Unlike drum brakes, disc brakes have no springs pulling back on the pads. Pressure is applied behind the caliper pistons and pushes them out which pushed your pads into the rotor and making the bike stop. When you let off the brake lever, the only thing that pushes the pistons back into the caliper is the pressure from the brake pads on the rotor. The brake fluid does not suck the pistons back or anything. So the pads will always touch the rotor. (unless your rotor is bent, then it pushes the pistons in too much and gives you an inconsistant feel of your brake lever)

Rule of thumb, put your bike on a stand, and spin the wheel. Like the showcase showdown on the prices right, the wheel must go all the way around or it doesn't count. If you get one rev out of it, you're fine.
Thats good to know. Because thats all I'm getting!
 

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By the way, if you are using your rear brake as much as your front, thats why its getting hot and your front isnt. Thats rhy you have bigger brakes up front, to deal with the heat and provide more stopping power. Your rear brake isnt really designed for that.. which is why its much smaller and there is only one.
 

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CBR/CUT is right, but I thought I'd quantify it anyway.

The front brake is supposed to provide 75% of your stopping power on a motorcycle. So in theory, you're working your back brake twice as hard as you should be by going 50/50. I used the front brake only sometimes, combined with engine braking, or light pressure on the back. With the exception of wet pavement and such

Good luck
 
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