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Discussion Starter #1
Ok guys looked around the forum and found post similar to this but not exactly so here goes.... engine revs climb fine with no problems no loss in power idles fine no looping no notice in loss of power while accelerating ....the problem is when clutch is pulled in and I am holding a steady throttle starting at say 6000-7000 RPM the engine will bounce like its hitting a rev limiter I can rev up to anything higher than that and will do the same thing I only have a slip-on and air filter no pc or bazzaz nothing done to the bike recently no FI light on ...any ideas on this?
 
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Release the clutch lever. Problem solved. You're not going to be able to ride and have the RPM's held without changing any with the clutch disengaged.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
yeah lets say your in 6th gear just riding along barely have throttle open then you pull in clutch and revs will go up and then RPMs hit around 7000 and then revs bounce from 7000-7500 back and forth ...does this at higher rpms it wont do it below 6000-7000 only when you have clutch pulled in and hold a steady throttle position
 
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What would you expect to happen from unloading the engine? The revs staying the same as they were before you disengaged the clutch?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
No..I know the rpms would change if I pulled in the clutch...if I am in a gear at lets say 5000 rpm....then I pull in the clutch(keep it in) and roll back the throttle just enough to raise rpm to 7000 then it would bounce between 7000-7500 while holding the throttle in the same position
 
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Release the clutch lever. Problem solved. You're not going to be able to ride and have the RPM's held without changing any with the clutch disengaged.
No..I know the rpms would change if I pulled in the clutch...if I am in a gear at lets say 5000 rpm....then I pull in the clutch(keep it in) and roll back the throttle just enough to raise rpm to 7000 then it would bounce between 7000-7500 while holding the throttle in the same position
Yeah, and do you expect that to NOT happen on an unloaded engine? There is nothing wrong with your bike. Stop holding the throttle with the clutch disengaged and your problem will go away.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yeah I expect that to not happen has not happened before and does not happen on other bikes so yeah something is wrong ...you saying its normal for revs to bounce when holding throttle in a steady position....???
 
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When you have the air pressure in the airbox differing and the throttle barely open, yes that is normal. If there was a problem, holding a steady throttle even in gear would have a fluctuation. 500RPM of fluctuation is not a lot. If it was going up 1000, 2000 or more, then you would have a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
it doesn't flux when in gear only when clutch pulled in and holding throttle...power still the same rides fine...just never had it do that before so thought I would see if anyone heard of this before or knew what could cause it....i think its something electrical because when i stopped and turned the bike off for awhile and then rode again it was fine no rpms bouncing after riding awhile longer I noticed it was doing it again... I dont know I guess I'll keep checking this thread for other replies to see what others think...
 

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Don't sweat it mate, your bike is fine.

Your talking about a lot of variables including air pressure, air velocity, ability of the fuel reg to maintain constant pressure etcetera etcetera... in the end all of these variables are capable of changing the rpm of the bike due to minute variations, and some of them compound on each other to a certain point (commonly the fuel reg is tied to the intake vacuum so changes in intake air pressure will cause variations in fuel pressure).

When you operate the engine in a no load condition the difference in power produced is enough to make the rpm go up and down a noticeable amount simply due to the fact that it takes bugger all force to speed the engine up or slow it down when compared to what the engine produces.

To give you an analogy:

The friction forces generated within the engine (this is what it has to overcome in order to speed up) can be considered to be a fly...
The power generated by the engine can be considered not to be simply one cannon but the entire armament of the USS Missouri...

Can you say overkill???
 
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