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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, I'm down to the point that I'm ready to go sign the check this Friday for a 600RR. I've been reading these forums over the last few days and I figured I'd just post this here to see if anyone thinks I'm a bit too nuts for my own good.

The only exposure I've had to motorcycles is the MSF course I took last year and riding my friend's dirtbike a few times when I was a kid. I'm 26 years old now, and I even enjoyed riding those little Nighthawk 250s around the parking lot for the MSF course.

Everyone I've talked to has told me that I'm going to drop my first bike so I should just get a junker to start and then get something nice later. But I'd say I felt pretty confident on the Nighthawk after only about 30 minutes or so, and while I'm willing to admit that it's possible I could drop my bike, I'd like to give myself better odds than a 100% chance it'll happen.

At any rate, my problem isn't going to be self control, I have a healthy enough fear of riding that I don't think I'll be doing anything beyond my skill level, but I'm confident that my riding skills will progress at a good pace. So instead of buying a used bike with the potential of outgrowing it in 3-6 months I'm pretty convinced I should just go get the 600RR and take it easy to start. I've been tempted to get a bike for years now, looking at the F4, then the F4i, mainly because the reviews all call them solid, forgiving bikes (or as forgiving as a bike can be).

I don't really have a question here, I'm just wondering if people are going to read this and the first thought that pops into their heads is "that guy's a complete idiot". To me, the only 3 reasons I can see for not learning on an RR are:

1) Too much power - I don't think that'll be a problem for me, I'm in no hurry to get myself hurt and I think I've got the self control to stay off the throttle.

2) Too much money to repair if/when I drop it - It would sting the wallet pretty bad if I did drop it, but it wouldn't be the end of the world.

3) There are better bikes to learn on - This is the only point I can see being up in the air. Would you all say the RR has any riding characteristics that are less forgiving to someone new to riding than say an F4i?

Any other random pieces of advice besides body armor, body armor, helmet, gloves?

Thanks,
Jon
 

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There are two types of riders those that have wrecked, and those that will. Kind of expensive to fix the rr if you do wreck it. I personally would get a used bike there are tons of used bikes out there with only 500 to 1000 miles on them. The main reason is they get scared by it or decide its just not for them. If you get a used bike you will be able to get your experiance and decide if riding is really for you. Then sell it this fall for like $500 less then you bought it for. Check out cycle trader or ebay they got some good deals but beware of scams.
 

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No one knows you better than yourself. I am a new rider too. I had never been on a real motorcycle before until just about a month ago when I bought a 2004 Ninja 636 at the prodding of a co-worker who taught me the basics of riding. I did drop the Ninja like 3 times but only because I was not taught proper low-speed braking (hint: make sure the bike is straight before grabbing front brake or else use rear brake).

Anyway, after the Ninja was stolen (dirty motherfuckers) :evil: I picked up a used 2003 600RR. I have ridden that and haven't dropped it as of yet. Whether it's because the RR is a friendlier superbike or just broken in well I couldn't tell ya.

To reiterate, only you can honestly tell how comfortable and proficient you are with a sportbike. Good luck and godspeed :smile: .
 

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Buy it! THe rr was my first bike. Only experience I had was the MSF course. Just take it easy for the first few months. I didn't even get mine on the highway for the first 2 months. Just around town. Also, stay away from riding with more experienced riders that like to go fast, until you are really comfortable. It can be intimidating, and you can easily try to impress someone and make a costly mistake. As long as you aren't a monkey, you should be fine on the rr, and it is a great bike. If I didn't get the rr as my first bike, I would be regretting it now, 6 months later. Just my .02
 

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The RR was my first bike as well. I've been riding for about a year now and haven't drop it(knock on wood) yet. As UPRM said, take it easy the first few months. Read up on books like Twist of the Wrist. I think that book helped me alot just for everyday riding even though it's more written for the track riders.
Good luck bro.
Danny
 

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Ninja Master
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My first bike was a brand new FZR600 years ago. I'd done quite well on the Nighthawks in MSF as well, but a 600 sportbike is a different animal, particularly at slow speeds. I dropped the FZR a couple times, all at slow speeds.

My .02, if I were to do it all again, would be to buy a used 600RR and put sliders on it immediately. That way, you're not paying a premium on the bike and it will hopefully be protected somewhat in the event of the inevitable low-speed drop.
 

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ND4SPDSHO said:
Any of today's 600cc sportbikes are not for beginners. I highly recommend getting an older 600(F2/F3) to beat up on while you figure things out. Save your money on the bike for now, and invest it into gear. Buy a good helmet/jacket/gloves/boots.


EDIT: Welcome to the site.
+1 and then some! Not a good first bike even though it is "rider friendly" and "forgiving". Buy used. Buy a sv650, cbr600f2/f3, gs500 to start.

<<1) Too much power - I don't think that'll be a problem for me, I'm in no hurry to get myself hurt and I think I've got the self control to stay off the throttle. >>

this isnt the problem. you have to develop good INTUITIVE, REFLEXIVE skills, not only have "self control".

Read this then decide.
http://www.beginnerbikes.com/editorials/formequalsfunction.htm

You will become aBETTER, FASTER rider if you start smaller, and with less hp.
 

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The RR is my first street bike and I wondered if it was a good idea to jump into a racer.
For me it came down to $$.
My MX experience told me that when you “out grow”
a starter bike it cost more to upgrade then it would have had a person purchased the “racer” in the first place.
The only part of this analogy that is applicable is the money part.
I did drop the RR at low speed & got myself into trouble on account to much power. No damage to bike, or me.
I was lucky. :roll:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I figured I wasn't alone in posting something like this. I'm just surprised that the subject comes up often enough that someone took the time to write that article and that it pegged at least 2 of my points.

I'm not doing anything until later this week, so I'm still going to think about it, maybe look around for some used bikes that might be a bit more reasonable but I have to admit the RR still has my eye.
 

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I started fresh out the gate on the RR
Dont sweat it GET IT!

Self control is all thats necessary!

You can go down on any bike from 50cc to 1300cc they all go over 60 mph
so you could waste on anything and get hurt. Take your steps in moderation! And enjoy it ! :bitchslap:
 

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Get a cheap bike and learn to ride. Yeh you might get made fun of here and there but we all went through it. Save your money and get it next nike year. By then the new 05's will be out. and you will have the sweetest bike in the world. :twisted:
 

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buy it

My first bike was a leftover 03 rr. Never rode before, never drove anything with a clutch before either. Never took the MSF course. I learned from friends an a culdesac and when i felt comfortable took it out on the road a bit. After a while I grew confident and went riding. It was dropped once by my brother as he was making a turn and misjudged the weight of the bike. Very small damage to my lower fairing because of my frame sliders. If you've taken the MSF course I say get the 600. Be careful and like someone posted before me, dont try to keep up with people who have liter bikes or are more experienced than you. This Saturday we went for a ride up Bear Mountan in NY and one of my friends has a busa and another the new zx-10 and they got ahead of me obviously because they're more skilled and have faster bikes. I went at my pace and at what I was comfortable with and caught up eventually.
As long as you dont go beyond your limits your fine.
The first and only bike I was on before this was my friends sons Honda 50 dirtbike, no clutch. Maybe I'll drop mine maybe I wont, but I'm happy I got this as my first bike.
 

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I don't think the RR has too much power or maybe it's that I am a fat pig, lol, (255#) damned beer gut. Seriously though, under 7000 rpms, the rr is pretty mellow. The RR was the first bike that I owned, and by taking it easy and working my way up in ability, I know I made the right choice. I do see how you could become a better rider by riding a smaller CC bike to start with but the only reason that applies is you'll have to push the bike much more to get the performance that you want. Isn't that more dangerous and isn't that why so many of you dropped your first bikes?!? I haven't dropped the RR yet (Knock On Wood) It's up to you, I won't reccomend any bike to anyone because they are all dangerous as hell. But, maybe you might want to pick up something used in case you find out it's not for you. you won't take such a financial hit if you decide to sell it.
 

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hey JonRR, i'm in the exact same shoes. i feel about myself exactly the way you feel about yourself. you know yourself the best. there are some people who started off with 600RR, most of riders don't seem to start with 600RR(or sportbikes). i think i fall into the first group, and i'm sure that's how you feel too. you seem like a careful and responsible person. so i'd say go for it.

if you can wait, i may be of more help because i am getting my 600rr(first bike after msf) probably this week or next week. once i have it, i can tell you my better opinion. but for now, even without having ridden 600rr, i'd say you go for it. heck, i was going to get ducati 748 for my first bike.

if u r one of those who have good body coordination, right mentality, good reflex, i think that pretty much says it all. Some people are just fast learners than others. i'm 26 too, and so far i've learned every wild stuff relatively fast w/o any loss.

it's up to u tho. as for me, i choose not go with lesser bike and go through a trouble to upgrade your bike to higher cc (though it can be a very smart move.. i guess i'm lazy haha) but above all, i know i am capable.

anyway, this is getting too long. i've been in the market for about a year now, and during that period, i did tons of researches and read tons of articles and asked for tons of advices from experienced riders. if you have done the same, you probably know your answer. :bounce:

ps: read the article mentioned above. good article.
 

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WherzRoony said:
... you'll have to push the bike much more to get the performance that you want. Isn't that more dangerous and isn't that why so many of you dropped your first bikes?!? .
If you get to the point that you're outriding the bike you're ready for an upgrade. But that wont happen right away. Took me 18 months of riding and upgrading the gs500 suspension and 9k miles later I'm on a 600rr and I'm a SMOOTH rider because of it [in the canyons].

Bikes get dropped because of inexperience and inattention. I dropped mine for the third time after having owned it for a YEAR. Each of the three times it was 5-10 mph, not riding it hard. Glad it wasnt the rr I had.

Buy a used smaller bike and you'll likely sell it for what you paid for it. They've depreciated already and there's a strong market for the "beginner" bikes. Hell, people have a hard time finding a used gs50o to buy.
 
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There is a reason that experienced riders advise to start on smaller bikes, and it is not lack of self control. It is called 'survival reactions'. Survival reactions are very, very bad on a bike (examples: locking up arms on grips when you are about to run over something, chopping the throttle mid-corner, target fixation, etc). The only way to un-learn survival reactions is through experience, period. Your brain may know exactly what NOT to do, but 10 times out of 10 a new rider's body will do it anyway. Sometimes you get lucky and nothing happens, sometimes you die, sometimes you just get minor injuries. Some people will say "that can happen on any bike" but the deal is that it happens much more often on a SS bike because the bikes respond much more quickly and decisivley to rider input (right or wrong) than any other category of bike on the road today. They turn in the easisest, the rev the quickest, they go where you look, (they also stand up more) than almost any other category of bike.

You will drop it. Riding it, pushing it around the garage, putting it on a rear stand, etc. If you have no other experience (and 30 minutes = 0) then you just are not acclimatized to dealing with a nice bike all the time, everyday.

The bottom line is that some people can get away with a 600SS for their first bike no sweat, but why take that risk? You will become a better rider faster, feel more comfortable and be more confident on a suzuki sv-650. As a new rider it will cost you much less in the long run. It won't be damaged as much if falls over in a parking lot, and will be fun forever, you may eventually want more power but you will never 'outgrow' the bike. It also holds great resale value and can be made into a very competent track bike or race bike.

Listen to us, we know, we have been there and done that, and have the t-shirts to prove it. There are so many other variables on the road, you don't want to have to worry about the bike your riding too.

Whatever you do, good luck.
 

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Buy a scratched up used 600 F2,3, or 4. Ride every day for a month and sell or trade.
 

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For what it's worth, I got a 04 rr as my first bike. I'm not bragging that I'm an expert rider right out of the box, but it wasn't that hard. I was a bit nervous...well really nervous at first but I'm getting used to it. But most veterans are 100% correct, you cant beat experience. I bought the RR with no experience besides riding around in town on my freinds r1 a few times and just browsing through bike forums. I put about 270miles on the bike and I'm still far away from being considered a decent rider.

Last weekend, I almost went into a wall of trees and bushes while turning left on a 35mph zone. Luckily, I braked enuff to just hit a little bit of gravel and pull out safely. As one of the guys mentioned before, sometimes you make it out safely, or you die or u get seriously injured and so forth. But again, for what its worth...I've read that when you panic or something goes wrong while turning the place wher eyou look at is going to be where you crash...so I always think of that when turning and riding and when little things went wrong last weekend I changed course of view as fast as my body/mind can allow. :)

good luck! and yea,, it's a BLAST to ride!!!
 

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Hey buddy, go on and make yourself happy. I'm sure every person on here had at least 2 reasons not to buy the RR, and about 2000 reasons to go with it. In the end if you are not happy with what you bought, you will spend even more money trying to be happy with it.

GO FOR IT!!!
 
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