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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I just bought a used 03 RR. I am first time rider on a sport bike (been on a dirt bike couple times thats all) with no experience. I would appreciate any tips you guys have when learning to ride on a sport bike.

One specific question I have is on how to properly/smoothly decelerate/stop when coming into a 4 way stop: What are the exact sequence of events? What I do usually is pull in the clutch as I close the throttle (this prevents the engine abruptly breaking the bike - if you do not pull in the clutch). As the bike coasts I apply the breaks.

The above works fine but there is a flaw in this ... What if you have to throw turning signal, I can't really reach the turn signal switch while having my fingers on the clutch. The other problem is that you do not have firm grip on you left handle bar since your fingers are on the throttle. This means that for example the bike would jump for some reason it would be harder to hang on and it would be dangerous if you relying on your right hand for hanging on since there is the throttle.

Any advise would be great. Thanks guys. A great forum!
 

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Discussion Starter #2
The other problem is that you do not have firm grip on you left handle bar since your fingers are on the throttle.

Correction: I meant to say this:

The other problem is that you do not have firm grip on you left handle bar since your fingers are on the clutch.
 

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Go to an empty parking lot to practice. You don't have to pull the clutch all the way in to disengage it...I use two fingers on the clutch so I can grab the left grip better... (Best bet would be to take a class). Good luck. T
 

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First and foremost you need to learn to ride. Take the basic Motorcycle safety course near you. Get off the street until you take one. What you are speaking about are basic motorcycle operations and you need some instruction and practice in a safe environment. After the course then you can start to venture out into the moving obstacle course of the road. If you don't, you can count on rashing up both you new ride and your hide.
 

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I hadn't even sat on a bike before I took the MSF. It helped me immensely. You should take the course ASAP.
 

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MSF. No question about it. It'll save you loads of money in repair bills from preventing an accident and may save your life. Get off the road and take the course. . . I don't care how many times you've ridden a dirt bike.
 

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a tip on the blinker situation, flick on the blinker before you pull the clutch. one less thing to think about when learning.

and get your butt in an MSF course!!!!!!! i took mine the weekend before i bought my bike. no way in hell would i be on the street without it.
 

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look up straight
pull the clutch in
kick the gear all the way down
smoothly pull the brake - DO NOT GRAB - in...
put ur left leg on the ground....

VOILA!!! U ARE AT A STOP!
learned it from MSF :)
 

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daMartian said:
look up straight
pull the clutch in
kick the gear all the way down
smoothly pull the brake - DO NOT GRAB - in...
put ur left leg on the ground....

VOILA!!! U ARE AT A STOP!
learned it from MSF :)
it should be
apply both brakes squeeeeezing the front brake not GRABBING
squeeze in the clutch
down shift to 1st
then when you come to a complete stop the left foot should come down first since your right foot is still on the brake.

But you should really take an MSF class if you don't know what you're doing.
 

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BlueBlur said:
a tip on the blinker situation, flick on the blinker before you pull the clutch. one less thing to think about when learning.

and get your butt in an MSF course!!!!!!! i took mine the weekend before i bought my bike. no way in hell would i be on the street without it.
I absolutely agree.... Take the course, the streets will be safer for both you and other people...
 

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Dude, do what works for you. I never put any foot down first, I put both down after I have stopped. You can throw it in neutral, hold the clutch, do what ever works for you, quickly it will become second nature for you. I never took the motorcycle course, and never wrecked, dropped or mangled any bike I have owned. However if you are having such confidence issues on such a basic issue, I would definetly recommend the course for you or for anybody.
 

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like everyone else said, an msf course will help you a lot. i did not take one, and in retrospect it got me into some bad situations i was lucky to get out of.

also true is that there is no one right way to ride on most things.

but don't overthink your problems. on the clutch/turn signal issue, just flip your turn signal before you clutch in. advanced warning to cagers never hurts.

you worry me w/ your thing about hanging onto the bike w/ your hands while clutching. you _are not_ holding yourself onto the bike w/ your hands. bad bad bad. you hold yourself w/ your legs. your arms and hands are there for steering input and function operation. keep your arms loose, elbows unlocked, when you ride so u don't hit a big bump and get ejected. keep your weight off of the bars, and support yourself w/ your legs, stomach, and back. if your wrists are getting sore/tired, you prolly need to make an adjustment to your style.

engine braking shouldn't be overused, but you can do it. the sudden decel you're talking about makes it sound like you're rolling in low gears. if you're in a higher gear, the decel will be slower and smoother, and you'll get better mpg too :) i usually go down to neutral and coast into stops, w/ myself ready to pop back into gear if i need to. but this can be dangerous, cause if you're coasting at 50mph and you accidentally slip into 1st or 2nd w/ a closed throttle the rear will lock and skid.

there's tons of little stuff you will pick up from riders and over time. for example, don't stay in gear and hold the clutch in at lights, b/c you are putting friction on your clutch plates. no biggie, but it extends the lifetime of your components. here's a bullet list of stuff to finish off my enormopost...

-- ride well below your percieved limitations; room for error is a very good thing and you will grow and progress over time w/ experience

-- use your mirrors, but check your shoulder too, and signal

-- always try to hit a corner slower than the speed you think is right. you can gain speed in a corner, but bleeding it off if u come in too hot is a dangerous proposition

-- minimum gear is jacket, gloves, and lid. if it's too hot for gear, it's too hot to ride. accidents happen on short trips too, so be religious

-- beware cars, they will kill you. never assume they see you, just pretend you are invisible. that guy coming towards the intersection might decide to blow his stopsign, so slow down, downshift, and get ready to react. semis = bad news, they can't see you, so stay away. don't ride next to cars, they're on their phones and will change lanes w/o checking. always look for places to go if something goes wrong.

-- the street is not the track. there are a bazillion variables, even on a road that is free of cars.

-- never never never come across the yellow line in a turn.

i could go on and on, but i've been enough of a preacher. have fun, be safe, and keep the rubber side down...
 

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I'll chime in like everyone else and say take the MSF course! Also, make sure you have gear. Be careful and ride safe. Please don't really ride until you know what you are doing, that keeps yourself and others out of harm.
 

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As a bunch of people said take the MSF course. I had very limited riding experiance and cringed a bit at the $150 price tag of the course. But after taking it I felt totaly capable when I went and picked up my bike. Most of the stuff you learn in the course you can not put into use until you get on the street but I find myself recalling the things they showed us at the course. I have had my RR about 3 weeks now and I am still in the brake-in so I am limited to about 5000 RPM but I am loving learning the bike and from what I have been told you will learn somehthing new everytime you ride so I guess the biggest thing which has been said over and over again

Ride Ride and Ride somemore noone here can teach you the things that just come with getting out there and riding.

Be safe everyone
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks guys. I really appreciate your input and a lot, lot gooooooood tips. I read them all. As for the couse, it is on my list and I am signing up.

I am one of those people who got their bike first before finishing the course. So since there is 1 month wait time I decided to practice in parking lot. No worries guys, as nooooobie I am afraid to get on the road myself.

The post was really for the purpose to get tones of tips (which I got :) ) from experienced riders so I can apply them while learning on the parking lot. I want to make sure that I teach myself good habbits, not bad ones before I hit the course. It is some times hard to unlearn stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
One thing I forgot to mention: Since this is first time on a sport bike for me, well after today 2nd time by reading a post written by one of you, I think I am relying too much on wrists to hang on to the bike. I am not as relaxed as I should be but yes I have my legs against the tank and my elbows are slightly bend. I think with time I will become more relaxed and confident.

Thanks again to all of you. Yay!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Oh yeah, and yes I forgot to mention ... The sudden decl comes from me riding in 1st gear. When I switch to 2nd its by far smoother and you almost don't feel it as much as in 1st.
 
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