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Moto GP Racer
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Discussion Starter #1
Ok...so I get the feeling a lot of people are upset over your flash rate since upgrading to LEd's. I cannot make an actual walkthrough for this b/c of the different components everyone is using. Not all of us have aquired the same LED's or have the same amount of them for that matter. I can however, give you some insight on how to wire them so you change your flash rate. The numbers I will use are simulated values so do not expect that they will work for you. Let's Begin...

Your light circuit has changed. You used to have a 12 volt system with 2 incandescent bulbs lit up (when your turn signal was engaged). This system worked well with your stock flasher. If you had 12 volts and two lights in parallel (assumed). They are 10 Ohm incandescent lights that are 5 Ohms effective in parallel. This gives you the value of 2.4 Amperes assuming there is nothing else in the circuit.

The common trend is to change the rear lights to LED's so lets run with that. You have removed 10 ohms from the circuit and added four LED's in parallel. Your led's from cathode to anode have 1.5K Ohms of resistance.

1/1.5K + 1/1.5K + 1/1.5K + 1/1.5K= 2.67 mSiemens(recipricate your answer) and you get 375 ohms.

Wow... you went from 5 ohms to 375 ohms. Your system thinks you have an open (burned out light) and therefore flashes faster. What we have to do now is called impedance matching. Basically we have to make our system think everything is ok while providing the right voltages and currents. This is why engineers get so much money. So how do we decrease the value of resistance? We add more in parallel!

Ok lets see what happens if we use a 10 ohm resistor.

1/1.5K + 1/1.5K + 1/1.5K + 1/1.5K + 1/10 = 9.74 OHMs!!!!!!!!!!

Conclusion adding anymore will actually make your resistance go down.
You now see you have almost the same value as the bulb you just removed. The system should work fine.

Remember...you have only solved the resistance issue. You still have current to worry about. You might have to add a small resistor in series to get you the right current so that you do not blow your LED's. DEpends on what LED's you use.

I hope I have enlightened some people. If you have any questions just ask.
 

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Damn somebody knows their sh*t.
 
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awesome post havoc! what rear signals are you using and what did you add to correct the flashing?

you might want to calculate this for the guys with the 2k2 led lights. they seem to be the most popular.
 

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Moto GP Racer
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3,753 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I did my own led's but it wont be too hard to do others. I didn't correct my flashing b/c I like the faster rate but I know some people would like to have it with the original flash. For those of you with the 2k1- Leds it won't be hard either. Remember I have not looked at the actual diagrams for the electrical system. I am assuming it is around 5 ohm because I took a measurement of the rear light and it was 10 ohms (I don't have my front lights anymore but they are still a similar bulb even though they are running lights). Technically, if you wire a 10 ohm resistor in parallel with your led's you should have a value close to 10. You can estimate resistance in parallel by just taking the value of the smallest resistor. It is usually around there.

I can't really help you out more more because my bike's electrical system is not even close to what it used to be. I have the Custom LED LPIII's in the front and the MD Wright integrator with my custom LED pegs in the rear.

I would need to work on some1's bike that is mostly stock except for the LED pegs.
 
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