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06/2016 BOTM Winner 07/2015 BOTM Winner
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Discussion Starter #1
well I have not been riding for long compared to alot of you, but as we all know if you ride long enough $hit will happen. Well $hit happend today but not to the extent of how bad it could have been.

Story:-

I was behind a riced out honda civic and came up to a T intersection. He turned right and I did as well, as soon as I made the turn I decided I did not want to be behind this doofus and his annoying fart can civic so I gave the throttle a good twist in second gear. I go flying by him and as I go past him and start to go back into my lane the handel bars start to shake back and forth, Im like WTF!!!, the bike starts to settle down and then I come do a slight hill ( more like a drop off ) and when I get to the bottom the bike starts to do it again. I was still carrying alot of speed when I came to that dip. The only thing I can think of is when i gunned it past the civic the front end must have come up, I did not notice it but when it came down it must have been out of line w/ the rear tire causing the front end to shake. When I came to that dip I think I was still carrying enough speed for that front tire to come up just enough to cause it again.

That road is not the best its bumpy so Im sure that did not help but I did not think it was that bad either. If the front wheel did not come up what else could have caused the head shake?? I was going stright at the time. GPR Steering damper is deff at the top of the list for next mods to do. When the front end was shaking I dont remember trying to fight it, I think I just let it do what it had to do and then it came out of it on its own.
 

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I just added a Scotts damper today.. Feels good ..
 

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bobbyp600rr said:
You can power out of it also, just stay on the throttle, never let off the throttle or it will get worse.
The quickest way to settle a tank slapper or head shake is to let go of the bars. The wieght of the bike will settle the bars automatically. "Fighting through it" can make the problem worse because you never allow the wieght back to the front tire so it can stabilize. Plus if the tank slapper gets too bad you can break your fingers and wrists trying to fight it.

Warp, have you set up your suspension yet? If not get to it. Buying a streering damper for a street bike is really overkill. If you're running that hard all the time then you need to be on the track. The geometry of the stock bike is very stable unless you do something wrong or there is a mechanical problem.
 

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06/2016 BOTM Winner 07/2015 BOTM Winner
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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
NewRedRider said:
Warp, have you set up your suspension yet? If not get to it. Buying a streering damper for a street bike is really overkill. If you're running that hard all the time then you need to be on the track. The geometry of the stock bike is very stable unless you do something wrong or there is a mechanical problem.
No I dont have the suspension set up for my weight yet but Id like to do that at some point. I dont run hard at all, just short bursts here and there. Im quite a consertive rider compared to most, no where in my orginial post does it say that I run hard quite often on the street....46 MPG says alot. I also think the rear tire was getting really good traction, it was in the mid 80's today so Im sure it was sticking quite well.
 

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you might wanna check if the weights on you front tires might have fallen off. I always thought that headshakes are caused by the front tire not being balanced. just my 2 cents.
 

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06/2016 BOTM Winner 07/2015 BOTM Winner
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Discussion Starter #7
jplynx said:
you might wanna check if the weights on you front tires might have fallen off. I always thought that headshakes are caused by the front tire not being balanced. just my 2 cents.
well if that was the case it would have been shaking all day and not just that one time. Its caused when the front tire comes up and lands out of line w/ the rear tire.
 

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NewRedRider said:
The quickest way to settle a tank slapper or head shake is to let go of the bars. The wieght of the bike will settle the bars automatically. "Fighting through it" can make the problem worse because you never allow the wieght back to the front tire so it can stabilize. Plus if the tank slapper gets too bad you can break your fingers and wrists trying to fight it.

Warp, have you set up your suspension yet? If not get to it. Buying a streering damper for a street bike is really overkill. If you're running that hard all the time then you need to be on the track. The geometry of the stock bike is very stable unless you do something wrong or there is a mechanical problem.

This is one time I have to disagree Red. Easing off the throttle is good but letting go of the bars completely is probably not the best idea. But you also don't want to try and correct the slapper either. Keep a relatively loose grip and slow your speed. Also the slapping will cause the pads to be pushed back so remember to check that the pads are reseated against the calipers or you may save the slapper to run off the road the next time you need to use the brakes.

I think a damper is a good idea on the street or track. A conservative rider may never make an insurance claim, but it would be bad advice to advise against insurance. A damper is just that, insurance against tank slappers. If you ever have one and it causes you to crash you think it will cost less than the $400 for a damper to repair?
 

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Warp_Speed said:
No I dont have the suspension set up for my weight yet but Id like to do that at some point. I dont run hard at all, just short bursts here and there. Im quite a consertive rider compared to most, no where in my orginial post does it say that I run hard quite often on the street....46 MPG says alot. I also think the rear tire was getting really good traction, it was in the mid 80's today so Im sure it was sticking quite well.
I didn't mean to imply that you were reckless but it only takes one time to cause head shake like that, as you already found out. Set your suspension. Atleast set your sag height. It's very important for stability.


Wolley said:
This is one time I have to disagree Red. Easing off the throttle is good but letting go of the bars completely is probably not the best idea. But you also don't want to try and correct the slapper either. Keep a relatively loose grip and slow your speed. Also the slapping will cause the pads to be pushed back so remember to check that the pads are reseated against the calipers or you may save the slapper to run off the road the next time you need to use the brakes.

I think a damper is a good idea on the street or track. A conservative rider may never make an insurance claim, but it would be bad advice to advise against insurance. A damper is just that, insurance against tank slappers. If you ever have one and it causes you to crash you think it will cost less than the $400 for a damper to repair?
That's alright Wolley. I should have been a little clearer. For a mild head shake I would agree to keep your grip light and let off the throttle. But I would never recommend anyone try to brake during a head shake. You can actually make it worse by adding wieght to the front too fast.

If it's full blown tank slapper then you better move your hands off the bars. You're not going to stop it by fighting it. All you have to do is pull your hands back and grip the tank with your legs. By letting off the throttle you will automatically add wieght back to the front and the bike will settle itself. I know many people rationalize getting a steering damper for insurance reasons but the truth is I think they would be better off paying someone to set thier suspension correctly or attending a good track day than buying a steering damper. These bikes are incredibly stable when they are setup correctly. So unless you're changing the geometry or pushing the bike extremely hard on the track or the street, your money is better spent elsewhere on things that will actually make a difference in your riding skills instead of being a fancy show piece for your friends.
 

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been there, done that, got the t-shirt. i got a nasty tank slapper on a dirty offramp. thought that was it. just added some throttle and it cleared itself up.

i never really heard the slow down school of thought though. new to me. i would have thought that adding wieght (which slowing down will) to the front tire makes it continue. intersesting. but i guess if you let go you do add wieght to the rear.
 

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What you're trying to do is realign the front tire with the rear tire. You have to let the bike's own weight settle the bars. There was a TV episode on just last week that was demostrating how stable motorcylces are. They had a rider on a gold wing doing about 30mph take his hands off the bars to show that the bike didn't just fall over. Then they had him hit the right side of the bar to purposely cause a head shake. He never tried to force the bike to settle. He simply hit the bar and allowed the bike to settle itself, which it did.

It is true that there are two schools of thought in how to deal with tank slappers. Here's a video of why I say never try to ride out a tank slapper. This is from the Isle on Man.

http://www.mad-ducati.com/Mpeg/tankslapper_tt99.mpeg

Also, look at this poll. almost 60% of the riders were hard on the gas at the time the tank slapper occured.
http://www.600rr.net/vb/showthread.php?t=23299&highlight=tank+slapper
 

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pare ko you weigh that much?
 
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