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What up everyone? My singer had a GSXr 750 & he told me everyone warned him about "high speed wabbles" Then he had one. He doesn't know what causes it. Does anyone know what cause it & what to do if you're in one?
Thanks
 

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Stabilizers/dampers help.... and if your in one, just DONT HIT THE BRAKES! let off throttle slowly and just look straight forward and hold on very tight.... they are pretty easy to get out of.
 

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I've been going REALLY fast for a while now, and I have never had anything bad happen over 160mph yet, but I think that if it were to happen, it would be caused be an imperfection in the road. I have had pretty healthy head shakes before, due to being in the gas really hard coming out of a turn, then as the front tire comes off the ground then back down in alittle different position the bars will wobble really fast as the bike tries to sort stuff out, but as long as you stay loose and DONT grab the brake( making the bike go in whatever direction the bars were pointed last) you will be fine.
 

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ToneDragon said:
What up everyone? My singer had a GSXr 750 & he told me everyone warned him about "high speed wabbles" Then he had one. He doesn't know what causes it. Does anyone know what cause it & what to do if you're in one?
Thanks
Are you speaking of head shake? First off, how is the bike set up? Could be tire pressure, wheels out of balance, rear preload too stiff or... steering head bearings/ajustment! Make sure your bike is properly maintained and check the tire presure before each ride! If the problem still persists, then mabe a steering damper would help! Also... an unkept road with ruts and potholes does wonders for poor handling ;-)


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clevisBacon said:
Stabilizers/dampers help.... and if your in one, just DONT HIT THE BRAKES! let off throttle slowly and just look straight forward and hold on very tight.... they are pretty easy to get out of.
correct except the holding on tight. Hold on with your knees. Relax on the bars. Going tight on the bars is more likely to increase the slapper than to solve it. They are self correcting but outside influence from the rider often make them worse.
 

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I experienced my first tank slapper the other day. I was following a big 'ol SUV and didnt see the raised pothole. The whole bike went airborn and when I landed the front wheel was not straight. I was thrown wildly around. I squeezed with the knees and got hard on the gas. It caused the front wheel to come up and an easy landing with a straight wheel this time and all was good. Not sure if that was the "correct" way out of it, but at the time and the .5 sec to do something before I went down, it worked for me.
 

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Also, is the tire balanced correctly. If it is even a little off, it can cause the front to feel twitchy at high speeds.

ben
 

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Dakota said:
I experienced my first tank slapper the other day. I was following a big 'ol SUV and didnt see the raised pothole. The whole bike went airborn and when I landed the front wheel was not straight. I was thrown wildly around. I squeezed with the knees and got hard on the gas. It caused the front wheel to come up and an easy landing with a straight wheel this time and all was good. Not sure if that was the "correct" way out of it, but at the time and the .5 sec to do something before I went down, it worked for me.
Damn that would have scared the piss outta me. :shock:
 

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to answer the question about cause, most of the time, it is the rider that causes the problem. Some bikes are more prone to this than others, but usually still, it is the rider. Often when the front twitches a bit, riders will tighten thir grip on the bars and arms lock up. This has the effect of pushing the bars, rather than letting them correct on their own. Then, when the front wants to self-correct the other way, the stiff arms prevent it from doing so and this creates sort of a back and forth cycle (tankslapper). This is why the "hang on tight" advice is bad. Hanging on tight to the bars at the wrong time is likely what caused it in the first place. Hnaging on tighter is only likely to make it worse. I was talking to a m/c chassis engineer a while back (Tony Foale) and he said that there is really no known technique to bring a bike out of a tankslapper. The only thing they've seen that seems to always have a positive effect is getting low on the bike. He said that nothing else seems to always work well. PEople say that X worked in their situation, but it just might be the bike correcting on its own.

He did also talk a bit about a condition similar to a tankslapper (I forget what its called) that is a harmonic shake in the rear. He said these are quite rare, and usually aren't induced by the rider; more of an engineering problem.

interesting dude. He's written books about chassis design and such. http://www.tonyfoale.com
 
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