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We all know that riding is dangerous. Why do we do it? I have a frien thta is looking into getting a bike, but he is having a hard time dealing with the fact that he may get hurt. It just got me thinking about how those kind of thoughts never entered my mind when I got started. How do you guys deal with the risk of riding?
 

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Falling is unfortuantly part of riding our sportbikes to the edge of their capabilities. With the proper education and respect for the heavier objects on the road we are just as safe as the cagers. Keep your eyes open :shock: and remember the road is full of idiots who don't see you. Save the balls to the walls stuff for the track. :smile:
 

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Yeah, I don't really think about it either, subconsciencly I just am always looking around me...my head is always checking other passengers rear view mirrors, and I'm always watching for people comming to intersections to make sure they stop...I dunno, tell your friend to take the MSF course, and I dunno, if he's really freaking out about it, then maybe he shouldn't get a bike...riding's not for everyone...
 

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I think about it constantly - that's what keeps me safe. If I'm tired, I don't ride, if I've had more than 1 beer, I don't ride, if I'm having a hard time focusing on what I'm doing, I go home. Being safe requires that you put everything else out of your mind and almost put yourself in a zen like state of concentration... sounds weird huh? Oh well, I guess it works for me - no accidents on the street in 15 years of highly... shall we say, "spirited" riding.

Additionally, I minimize risk by riding for pleasure vs for transportation. I don't ride to work, I avoid busy 4 lanes, I try to avoid the interstate during peak times etc.

I think you HAVE to think of the risks... or it'll bite you at some point. ;-)
 

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I think about it all the time too. Risk is an inherent part of life and everytime we thumb that starter, we up the risk factor considerably. Tell your friend there are alot of things he can do to mitigate the risk. Wear all of his protective gear, take the MSF, spend some time on a track, etc. I agree with Hollywood too. I won't ride if I'm overly tired, if I'm really pissed off, if I've had more than 1 beer (maybe 2 if its over a long period of time but not more than 2), sh#t, I won't ride if my gut tells me not to. I love this sport and won't give it up but I'm not some huge risk taker anymore either. Bottom line, use your common sense and good judgement and you shoud be around to enjoy this sprot for a long, long time.
 

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I think about it until I crank it, then put it out of my mind. I don't want to think about it when I am riding because I may over react to something small and hurt myself if you get what I mean. We have the risk of falling in the shower and breaking our necks in the morning. Bikes are extremely dangerous but with gear and caution, the risk gets a lot lower. Just don't be nervous when you ride otherwise the spaz affect of a small pothole could cause you to hit the ditch vice just a small swerve.
 

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But if he is afraid of riding, how can he justify driving, or flying? There are inherent risks in everything we do. More people seem to put emphasis on the fact that motorcycling is a dangerous past time but fail to look at how relaxing and fun it can be. I was very nervous the first time I rode. After a few rides I built a little more confidence and it skyrocketed from there. I also noticed that cagers, for the most part, are a sensible group. I have only had a few close calls and consider myself fortunate that nothing came out of it. There are always things to minimize risks, just read previous posts. The MSF course is a MUST though. Good Luck!
 

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How do I deal with it? When I am not riding I look at crash videos and pictures. I read stories about how people got hurt. The more I learn from their experiences, the more cautious I have become. I choose to ride my bike and ready to accept the consequences.

If he is not mentally ready, word of caution, don't let him get on the bike. He may get killed or kill someone. He must take a MSF course and slowly discover his own abilities through his own riding experiences. Steer away from peer pressure and go about the ride within his own boundaries.

Riding is like Karate, be one with your environment... So now, concentrate, Daniel-son. Wax-on... Wax-off...
 

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I get away from cars and trucks when I ride because I see them as potentially dangerous by creating space around me.

I'll go fast to pass a car, turn onto a side road, or slow down so no one is infront of me, next to me, or behind me. I'll go early on a Sunday or after rush hour. I know the lonely roads bumpy, tristed, steep, and empty that don't lead anywhere.
 

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How do I deal with it? Nihliistic denial. :mrgreen: No seriously. All the above posts pretty much lay out the mindstate necessary to be as safe as possible. Aside from wearing protective gear the only thing that will keep you safe is your mental state and judgement. Crazy **** happens all the time but many accidents happen when a rider's mental state makes him/her vulnerable. Riding is not the place to blow off steam. It's also not a good place for over aggressiveness, bravado, or immaturity. Your friend's fear and awareness of his vulnerability is a good place to start. An MSF course and progressive experience riding will mellow that paranoia down to calm cautiousness. If a person is terrified then maybe motorcycles are just not the right activity for them. No problems there. Motorcycles are definitely not suited for everyone just as acrophobia is not suited for skydiving and claustrophobia is not a good match for cave exploration. Have them start with the MSF course. That's usually a good way to test the waters.
 

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I don't think about it much. I stay aware of my surroundings and try to keep myself as safe as I can. You could get hurt doing anything, walking down the street, driving your car, etc. Life is too short, try to make the most of it while you are here. That's what I believe. If he can't get past the fear though, riding probably isn't for him. Fear just pust himself and others in danger.
 

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Fear is not good when riding these machines. Fear can cause, and has caused plenty of unfortunate incidents. It's education, awareness, and RESPECT for the bike that helps keep you at your safest. With educations/experience the fear should subside. Being aware and keeping your head on a "swivel" is very important. Anticipating what other motorist on the street MAY do has saved my behind plenty of times.

Naturally there will be some sort of anxiety experienced by any new rider. But if that anxiety stays at a high level with a person for too long, then perhaps riding ain't for them.

Just my two cents
 
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What will be will be. You have to do everything in YOUR power to be a great rider. Know your limits and know your environment. If you are careful, you greatly reduce the chance of you getting hurt. It is the other people on the road that you really have to worry about.

Also...wear the proper gear. You see professional riders go down and get right back up. If you have the right gear on, you can greatly reduce the chance of injury.
 

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You can get hurt getting out of bed these days. You only live once so you might as well live it the way you want to. Other wise you'll become old and grey playing the " I should of, would of, could "of game!
 

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I just coke out and ride fast and try not to think about it.
 

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dynamos2000 said:
I just coke out and ride fast and try not to think about it.
you do what? :scratch:
 

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bikes have been in my family for a long time, grandpa, dad, uncle, hell my aunt raced WERA. Two thing that really stuck with me:

when i got a bike my grandfather said: "Just remember--your chin is the hood ornimant."

and my dad said: "assume you're invisable"

basicly just what everyone else has said, respect the danger and be smart, but being afraid will get you hurt.
 
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