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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Fellow RR riders or those that may discover this from other sources, this is a how you can change your tires via the "spoon method" or by hand/at home. I decided to make this investment because most shops in my local area charge $30-35 per wheel, more if the wheel is on the bike. After purchasing a new to me 09 600rr (1500 miles woot!)

I wanted to take my 1/2 life q2's and put them on the new bike. Then take the brand new OEM qualifiers to put on the bike that I want to sell (06 600rr) that way when I sell, the buyer will have brand new tires and I get the grip from the q2's on my new bike. Best of both worlds. However after talking to local shops most wanted 150 + tax even if I brought the wheels in.... is this real life? They consider it 4 tire changes which I agree since it technically is but I am ballin on a budget and always looking to save.

So I start researching how to change tires on your own and of course I come across NO-MAR Tire Changers which is great if :
1. You want to bolt it down (or use a hitch attachment)
2. Have the space
3. Have more money to spend on this endeavor (changer and balancer)

However if you want to put a little extra elbow grease into it and save a few bux, this is how you can change tires by hand for <$250 which means it will just about pay for itself after my next tire change, along with changing for friends :) I have been riding for 8 years and this is my 4th bike (5th counting wifes). I am not getting out of the 2 wheel scene anytime soon. So then of course I discover scudman's tire change :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Pfp2Z9k0n0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AerHAYs435s

But there is a couple issues with that because he does not give a F about the rim he is using. Its his beater so changing on the ground was ruled out and I had to purchase a motorcycle tire changer/bead breaker to get the wheel off the ground to prevent scratching and warping any rotors. So the research began and here is the list of things I bought:

Tire changer / bead breaker - $96
[ame]http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004FGR4DG/ref=oh_details_o01_s00_i01?ie=UTF8&psc=1p[/ame]

Motorcycle wheel balancer - $69
[ame]http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003QT26D6/ref=oh_details_o01_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1[/ame]

Those are your two big purchases then comes all the little things:

Wheel weights - $10
[ame]http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002KQY92W/ref=oh_details_o02_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1[/ame]

Tire irons / spoons $24 + $12, You want 3 tire irons at least one long one (16 inch) and 2 other at least 11 inch
[ame]http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000WJFF6S/ref=oh_details_o02_s00_i01?ie=UTF8&psc=1[/ame]

[ame]http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000RG723U/ref=oh_details_o03_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1[/ame]

Rim guards you will need 3 and they come in sets of 2 - $20
[ame]http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004LUXKSO/ref=oh_details_o02_s01_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1[/ame]

Valve Core remover - $5
[ame]http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001KO84I0/ref=oh_details_o02_s02_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1[/ame]

Valve Stems which I wanted to go ahead and get 90 degree and something that I can reuse - $22
http://www.600rr.net/vb/showthread.php?t=2
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I will say this is a 2 man/woman operation; can it be done by yourself? Sure, but to be honest just having another set of hands makes this go by so much easier and faster. So even if it’s your gf/wife or even someone that isnt mechanically inclined, you can at least instruct them on “hold this” or “grab that”.

Other misc. things you need are compressor and torque wrench along with tools to remove wheels off the bike

If your keeping tabs that’s $258 getting the angled valve stems, if you want to go cheaper then just get some regular valve stems and that brings you under $250

Here is the tire changer/bead breaker (I put a towel over it so rim is not contacting metal) along with balancer, spoons, rim protectors, valve stems, soap and water (use this throughout the whole process from removing the tire to putting it on, Remember she likes to be lubed) wheel weights, valve core remover along with tools. I highly recommend investing in the T handle socket wrench/allen wrench set, I ordered it a couple years ago and it saves so much time when it comes to fairings.









Normally you wouldn’t need 2 sets of stands but for what I wanted to do I did so heres the bikes on the stands.





Next I took off both rear wheels



Now let the fun begin, remove the valve core by using the tool and let all the air out of the tire, its very important that you keep the wheel direction the same so I took painters tape and wrapped it around 2 of the spokes with arrows pointing in direction. On the 09 it has direction arrows on the rim but this is easier to identify



Next you are ready to break the beads, one on each side



 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Once the beads are broken then you need to pull one side of the tire up and over the rim. Slip the rim protectors on the rim and then wedge the big tire iron in between the protector and the rubber at the 12 oclock position. Next pull it up and over the rim, then you will use the other at 11 oclock to do the same. Finally take the 3rd tire iron and go to the 1 position and pull it over the rim, the rest you can do by hand (remember soap and water) to pull over



Next for this part I removed the wheel from the tire changer, I let the rim rest on my foot. Then place a protector on both sides of the rim and slide a tire iron on top of the protectors but under the rubber. Get some…. Soap and water here because after prying the iron up you should be able to take the tire off with a little finesse



Alright one rubber is off


I had to repeat process for other bike as well so here you go


Now, putting the rubber back on the wheel is the tricky part. Remember the tire is smaller than the rim and we have to put the rubber on the wheel…. is it magic? F no it’s a PITA lol. Remember soap and water is your friend!!! Try not to get it directly in the wheel itself but all along the edge. The first side of the tire you can do by hand and is your freebie (yay), now slide 3 rim protectors at your 11, 12 and 1 o’clock positions, press the wheel on as much as you can (at the area right in front of you, working outward) and keep pressure using your knees at 4 and 8 o’clock position.

Wedge an iron at the 11 o’clock position on top of the rim protector but under the tire and flip it away from your body, then you will go to the 1 o’clock position and do the same. Leave those 2 irons in place (scud man removes his but this is why having 2 people is best) and use the 3rd placed at the 12 o'clock position. This will be your hardest one and when having a friend to pull from the other side for best leverage comes into play.






*** NOTE*** The tires should have a “dot” marking(or may use something like warning label check with manufacture, Dunlop’s have a dot) that you need to line up with the valve stem. Its supposed to be the lightest point of the tire. Here is a good picture showing the alignment




Now that the tire is on, use the compressor to air it up until you hear both beads pop. Put the valve core back in and inflate to desired PSI. Your done!

 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Next you need to balance your wheels. Place the rod through the wheel and then screw the cones in place (just a little hex screw that secures it to the rod). Now give it a very light spin/tap and let it settle, the heavy spot will fall to the bottom. I found it best to use a piece of duct tape and place it directly at the top, then you can rotate the wheel down and use duct tape to place the weights on (may be redundant to some but I have been able to accurately and more quickly balance doing this). Start with 1 weight and see how that does, if it still moves and settles with the heavy spot at the bottom then place another weight and so on. Once balanced you should be able to rotate the tire to any position, stop it and it will not move. You can then remove backing from weights and stick them





Then install wheels and that’s it! feelsgoodman.jpg

Feel free to hit me up with any questions
 

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Nice write up. I learnt from watching scudmans vids as well. Saved me ALOT of money. Up here it was 100$ f&r for mount and balance, and I brought in just the rims with the old rubber off and new rubber half on the rim.
My total cost is 55$, not including 90* valve stems. 30$ for tire irons + 15$ for rim protectors but I also use cut out milk cartons + 5$ valve core remover. And for balancing I use jack stands, a metal rod and a couple bearings, 5$ if you already have jack stands.
To get the rims off the ground I just used a couple scrap 2x4s and a towel over top, lifts high enough so the rotors don't touch ground.


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nice write-up, thanks :hello:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Nice write up. I learnt from watching scudmans vids as well. Saved me ALOT of money. Up here it was 100$ f&r for mount and balance, and I brought in just the rims with the old rubber off and new rubber half on the rim.
My total cost is 55$, not including 90* valve stems. 30$ for tire irons + 15$ for rim protectors but I also use cut out milk cartons + 5$ valve core remover. And for balancing I use jack stands, a metal rod and a couple bearings, 5$ if you already have jack stands.
To get the rims off the ground I just used a couple scrap 2x4s and a towel over top, lifts high enough so the rotors don't touch ground.


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There is definatly a few cheaper ways to do it, I thought about doing the whole balance off pitbul stands, and again with plastic cut outs but just decided to make the investment because Ill be doing it for myself and friends.

Cool writeup. I thought about doing this myself as well but after a little research on how much labor and new tools are involved I'll gladly pay the $30 per wheel not to have to bother.
More power to ya tho!


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Guess it also depends on how many tires you go through, with a couple track days and lots of commuting its worth it not to mention hooking up my buddies

Nice write up! I'll stick to doing tire changes on my NoMar in less than 5 minutes apiece by myself though.... ;)
On that poverty time but one day
 

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Never had a tire changed for me on my dirtbikes. Always just did it myself. For some reason, street bike tire changes though...well, I just stayed away. Thank you for posting all of the info. Will start working my own tires soon enough!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I don't understand why you need the tire changer/bead breaker and 3 tire irons.. He used two in the video. Why wouldn't the three piece set you linked to be adequate?
The tire changer is needed to get the rim off the ground, you could get around this by placing 2 - 2x4's under the wheel however the tire changer has a rod in the middle with a wing nut that secures the wheel in place makes things much easier (as you see him struggle when he is trying to place his knees on the wheel this does not happen in my case) and the bead breaker is self explanatory.

He used 2 irons in the video because hes prolly done a billion of them, the rule of thumb is the more leverage you have the best so I wanted to order an extra set of the 11inch irons, I am sure once I have done it alot I can get away with doing it only needing 2, but I bought everything and planned a day and did not want to need extra tools/parts (more of a just incase thing). Your mileage may vary :)
 

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Thanks for the writeup gat0rbait! Could you look @ my cart here and let me know if there is anything missing/anything you would change? I know the tires are out of stock so I'll be ordering those from STG.

My bike has angled valve stems already and they are reusable however do i still need to replace the valve cores? Are valve cores universal or do i need special ones?

Thanks buddy!



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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Looks good to me not a fan of the beads but I have heard good things about them so to each their own. Do you have a decent compressor to pop the beads?

As far as the valve core I dont believe there is any reason to replace that I did some quick reading when I was researching and they really shouldn't go bad so I wouldnt worry about it.

GL with those power 3's man going to be sticky.
 

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Perfect thanks man! I have a little electric compressor here at my house that should probably be able to pop the beads, but if it cant my brother has a big 4hp compressor capable of keeping up with sand blasting so if mine cant his can lol.
 
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