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I wrote this post over on my personal blog about the "quick throttle" mod I did, and figured I would share this here.

The stock throttle tube on the 2003-2011 CBR600RR is 1/4 turn or 33.8mm. Most people when looking at changing to a “quick turn” throttle use the Yamaha R6 throttle tube, which is 1/6 turn or 40.5mm.

Another option is the HRC throttle tube. If you’re after a 1/5 turn the Yamaha R1 throttle tube is also an option. I decided to use PVC coupling and once completed measured up at 40mm. I guess you could buy the R6/R1/HRC throttle tube, but it will be more expensive.

Part Numbers
33.8mm (1/4 turn) – CBR600RR Throttle Tube (2003-2011) – Part: 53140-MCF-000 (stock)
36.5mm (1/5 turn) – Yamaha R1 Throttle Tube (2007-2008) – Part: 4C8-26240-00-00
40.5mm (1/6 turn) – Yamaha R6 Throttle Tube (2006-2009) – Part: 2C0-26240-00-00
40.5mm (1/6 turn) – HRC Throttle Tube – Part: 53141-MT7-000

Tools You Need
  • dremel or some sort of small cutting and sanding tool
  • socket set / screwdrivers
  • 25mm PVC coupling
  • epoxy
  • service manual
To obtain the needed slack on the throttle cables for the larger diameter cam you will have to create more at the throttle bodies, also wind in your throttle cable adjuster at the housing too which will allow you to create as much slack as possible. So with this in mind open up your service manual and get to work. You will need to remove the ram air duct covers, tank cover, prop tank up, remove the ECU, air box lid, velocity stacks and air box. The task seems daunting, but should be able to get to the throttle bodies in about 15 – 20 minutes.

This is what the stock throttle cam looks like.


1. I used my dremel to cut the end off of the fitting a little wider than the actual width of my throttle cam.


2. I cut a section out of the PVC loop to fit over the throttle cam. I used the sanding wheel to “scuff” the inside of the PVC then cleaned it with some isopropyl and glued it onto the throttle cam. After the epoxy set, I used my grinding wheel to make the PVC the same width as the throttle cam and tapered the PVC to allow the cables to run smoothly.


3. I used the sanding wheel on my dremel to smooth the edges of the PVC are perfectly smooth so that way it wont bind to the housing, and cleaned with isopropyl alcohol.

4. I had to use my cutting wheel on my dremel to make the throttle housing bigger to fit the larger cam in. I’m not sure if the newer model 600rr needs this but I know the housing on my 2003 model needed it. I took a few millimeters off the inside of the top and bottom of the housing. Then I connected the throttle cables up to the cam, and tightened the nut at the throttle bodies.

Before reinstalling make sure you check for any binding, and confirm the nut at the throttle body is tight. Putting back together is the reverse of pulling it apart. Then readjust your throttle free play if you have any. I like to have virtually zero play.

So that is the “quick turn” throttle mod for my 2003 CBR600RR. If you’re attempting this mod, you do so at your own risk. I will not be held responsible for any mishaps that may happen by doing this mod.
 

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Benefit is faster throttle response and less twist required to get to wide open throttle.

The best size to go with is what you feel comfortable with. Buying a quick turn/action throttle kit with replaceable cams will allow you to adjust the size of the cam, so you could start at 40mm, then go to 45mm and 50mm after you get comfortable.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
what is the benefit of doing this? and which is the best to go with? 1/6?
Most people use the R6 which is 1/6 turn. It's a subtle difference, nice.

The best size to go with is what you feel comfortable with. Buying a quick turn/action throttle kit with replaceable cams will allow you to adjust the size of the cam, so you could start at 40mm, then go to 45mm and 50mm after you get comfortable.
Only way to get more than 40mm on the '03 would be a whole kit with a new throttle housing. I didn't want to spend that kind of money, and 1/6 turn is perfect for the street (and probably track, too).

Nice write up! Seems easy enough. I may have to do this DIY in the future :)
Sweet as man. If you review it on YouTube, give me a shout out. :p Any questions, just ask.

I just went with the r6 1/6 turn for 20 bucks, and didn't need to make any throttle body cable adjustments.

It's close, but you have barely enough slack to make it work.
On my '03 there was no chance of doing it (my PVC is .5mm off the R6), so no idea how you managed.

Also to get the R6 here in OZ it is a lot more than $20 unfortunately. So a $2 piece of PVC worked wonders.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Can this be done on my 2008,cbr600rr? I don't like the slack in my throttle
Adjust the slack with the screw bit at the throttle. ;-) This mod isn't to remove slack (even though it does somewhat).
 

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lol when I first took it apart, I thought that there was no way, but with an extreme amount of fidgeting I managed. I followed the write up on 1000rr.

I would have done the PVC for sure sure if I didn't have the r6 tube available


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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Discussion Starter #13
lol when I first took it apart, I thought that there was no way, but with an extreme amount of fidgeting I managed. I followed the write up on 1000rr.
I enabled as much slack as I could at the adjuster, and there was no way I was going to wrestle and risk ruining the throttle cable, so tear down it was.

You can even get one on eBay for under $10
To get it here in Australia, it's roughly $14 for the tube + $20 for shipping. Local trip to hardware store + $2 is a lot cheaper.
 

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Nice write up. Easy to follow as long as you have the bike's manual. The hardest part was grinding out the throttle housing. A lot of trial and error. But I finally got the throttle tube installed with no binding. This works fantastic! I can't wait to get to the track and try it out for real. I use to have to turn my wrist as far as I could, regrip, and turn the rest of the way. What a pain! This will be so much easier. This is in the category of "Why didn't I do this a long time ago?"

Thanks!
Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Nice write up. Easy to follow as long as you have the bike's manual. The hardest part was grinding out the throttle housing. A lot of trial and error.
If you're getting into removing this stuff one would assume you have a manual handy. ;-)

It was a little trial / error with mine too, but is a lot better!
 

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Does this really make that much of a difference in throttle response? I don't have issues with either of my bikes, but I also have a fairly big paw.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Does this really make that much of a difference in throttle response? I don't have issues with either of my bikes, but I also have a fairly big paw.
There isn't much difference in throttle response at all, it is more to improve WOT as your hand doesn't have to turn around as far and have to reposition it.
 
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