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Discussion Starter #1
I have a friend who is new to riding that me and my buddies ride with. He crash about a year and a half ago and things haven't been the same. He didn't get hurt at all just totaled his bike. His bike was barely running before he crashed so it probably wasn't a huge deal (he made it seem like it).

My point is before the crash he was new to riding but he would push himself and try and learn. Now with his new bike (2005) R6 it's like he doesn't even try to learn. It looks like he doesn't push himself and I will give him solid advice but I don't see him using it he just keeps doing the same things.

Has anyone else had a friend like this I remember when I started I took things easy but not this long even after my off I was back at it the same day. It's been a year and a half for him. I need some advice.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
See if he'd be up for a track day. Wrecking there is considerably safer.
I would totally do that but he wouldn't have all the proper gear to go. He would need a suit. I think he just doesn't trust his bike. And I don't know how I can show him he can unless he leans over more and gives it some more gas. He wont go over 30 miles per hour even through large sweeping turns. I'm riding one handed just fine and he is struggling to keep up.
 

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Near my local(ish) track, there is an outfit that rents gear and suits. Might check into that. But get him to sign up for MSF courses and advanced riding lessons. Classwork and a better understanding of the bike and road might help him. If he doesn't learn to ride properly he will be more of a danger to himself. Making him comfortable on a bike again would be the biggest priority. Plenty of instruction available out there via online or in person.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Near my local(ish) track, there is an outfit that rents gear and suits. Might check into that. But get him to sign up for MSF courses and advanced riding lessons. Classwork and a better understanding of the bike and road might help him. If he doesn't learn to ride properly he will be more of a danger to himself. Making him comfortable on a bike again would be the biggest priority. Plenty of instruction available out there via online or in person.
That is a good idea. I don't think he took any courses. Either did I though. I told him to watch the twist of the wrist 2 film and slowly go out and practice each thing one at a time. But it seems like he is too scared to even try them and lean the bike over. But I'll suggest to him to take a course. I'll probably go with him.
 

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yea you should get him in some classes. dont do it on the street, he may not feel comfortable yet and comfort it is important. you dont want to push him past his capabilities. if he wrecks again just imagine what he'll be like after that 0_0
 

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My suggestion to this cases is to leave it to pros.
If he keep likes motorbikes he should take a class to something like California superbike school.
lvl1 will make him have a great, fresh new start.
 

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Pushing someone to ride harder than they are comfortable on the street is asking for disaster. Let him enjoy his ride how he enjoys it and encourage him to attend some classes if he desires.
 

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This only my $0.02 but I'd let him take his time. If he really wants to get back into it he will, if not he won't. Maybe it's just taking him a while. Pushing any rider when he/she may not be comfortable is just asking for trouble (like LanCo said). I can't imagine how I would feel if I were pushing someone to ride above their comfort level and they got hurt or worse...it'd be a terrible thing to live with. This sport has enough risks without us pushing our own to a level they aren't ready for...ride so everyone goes home...
 

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You'd be surprised how far a good, honest talk can go. Some time when you two are hanging out NOT riding simply ask him how he feels, ask about his concerns and let him tell you if he wants to get over his fear.

Don't be judgemental, don't offer advice, don't offer solutions and don't try to "help" just let him talk.

My guess is putting it into words might clear things up in his mind. Then let HIM ask you questions. Then suggest books, videos, track days and schools. Even try taking an advanced rider class with him, MSF should have one.

See how that goes. Had a friend wreck a Ducati following me one day, he was slow to get going back to speed but eventually got over it; some do, some don't. It did take home a while.

Mike
 

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Pushing someone to ride harder than they are comfortable on the street is asking for disaster. Let him enjoy his ride how he enjoys it and encourage him to attend some classes if he desires.
+1. If he's slow & careful in corners then he's not comfortable or confident in his abilities or the bike. The street is not the place for him to build confidence or skills. It's the place to apply them with wisdom. He needs to get to a place he can work on his skills in a safe controlled environment. Rider courses would be advised. If not available I suggest a very large parking lot with mini cones and some drills like found in the Total Control series of books/videos. A track day is only any good if he has a plan to follow to work on his skills or someone to teach. Just going for it on an open track day won't help much. You also say he doesn't have proper gear and his bike was barely running? First thing he needs is something to protect his hide and a well maintained bike. Without those he's asking for trouble and guaranteed to have the permanent reminders of it.

In order of importance.
1. Mechanically sound bike.
2. Proper gear.
3. progressive practice of skill drills off public roads in a controlled environment (track or parking lot).
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for all the tips guys to clear some things up. The bike he had before was barely running he has a sound bike right now. And to be honest as much as a Superbike School would improve his skills by a lot I don't think he would go for that $$$ wise and pride wise. We are pretty sure he got a bike because my group of friends got bikes around the same time and is looking to fit in. I know it sounds childish for my age (24) but seems like it.

Parking lot with some cones sounds like something that he'll go for. And I wasn't pushing him too hard I can see him go through semi tough turns right after I give him some advice than couple turns later its back to his normal riding.
 

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+1 School & gear or serious talk.

Frankly, I think some people just aren't cut out for riding. No shame in it, it's not for everyone. I think a lot of people have this romanticized vision of being a rider without really understanding the risk and commitment involved. IMO They're the ones who typically quit after their first off. After a year and a half I suspect this might be the case with your buddy but he's reluctant to quit because his friends still ride. If you don't eventually get over the paralyzing fear then you're essentially always exceeding your comfort zone.
 

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And to be honest as much as a Superbike School would improve his skills by a lot I don't think he would go for that $$$ wise and pride wise.
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Pride??? What exactly are his accomplishments and ability where pride stands in the way of improving riding skills? Pride, delusion, & ignorance are what got him into the situation he's in. He's better off to give up now & save himself the pain, expense, and possibly his life. Maybe that's what you should talk him into.

I can understand not having the funds for expensive racing courses but that's not what he needs. He's missing some basics. First being not riding over his head in a group.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Good news guys, I rode with him again with my buddies last week and he is getting better. We aren't having to wait for him when we are speedy crusin. And he is actually attacking turns now. Maybe I was just a little too worried but I know he watched The twist of the wrist two film I told him about. But now he is actually stepping up to the plate. And after every good run we all stop and tell him how much he is improving to give him that drive. I didn't think I would get such a response on this thread but thanks for everyone's advice sending out thanks right now
 

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Best advice I ever received about biking (after a nasty two bike, high side crash) - If you can live happily without riding, then give it up. It's dangerous. But if you need the rush or something, then go to track. It's the safest way to ride.

Your friend may just need time. But if he's riding because of peer pressure, maybe give him an easy way out.

Otherwise, I would reiterate what everyone else has said - get him (and you) to the track. I rode street for 20+ years before my first time on the track. I learned more in one day than I had in 20 years (combined), and I've continued to improve since. There is no substitute for track lessons/riding.
 

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As a 19yr old I tended to take canyon runs at absurdly high speeds. Combine that with a hi-po driving school I had just finished and my accord v6 and I were unstopable in my mind. That ended with the car on its roof in a wash on the side of the road. I was about 4ft. from going over a cliff at one point in the spinning and what not, which would not have ended well. It completely humbled me, and even put the fear into me.
How did I conquer the fear? I got in my buddys mustang's passenger seat and sat there while he drove the same road at really high speed. Took a few trips before I finally stopped trying to rip myself out of the car in fear.

Another buddy of mine was leading a group ride on his bike. Light turned yellow, he stopped. Guy behind wasn't paying attention and was suprised, grabbed the brake so hard he literally supermanned off the bike like a missle. He landed on my buddy and totaled both bikes, also got himself a helicopter ride that day lol. My buddy gave up street and bought a track CBR. Made maybe 2 trackdays then gave up riding completely. He just couldn't get past the fear.

Some people have the will in them, some don't.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I rode street for 20+ years before my first time on the track. I learned more in one day than I had in 20 years
Whao that is crazy I always wanted to go to the track I just need pants now. I think my other gear is track certified. I have a new baby girl though and I don't want to blow money until I move out with my girlfriend and my daughter :(
 

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Some people have the will in them, some don't.
I don't see it so much as will - there's no shame to quitting riding.

I see it as some of us have a craving or desire that needs something like a bike to satisfy. Without that craving, we would all be smarter to ride in a cage. Just my $0.02.
 

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I'm actually just coming back from a crash, it wasn't too bad but my collar bone got the worst of it. I've had a passion for bikes from a young age so all that goes in my head is, "I can't wait to ride again".

I honestly think it will just take time. The more he rides his bike, the more comfortable he'll get with it. Just remind him there's no rush to gain experience. Riding is something that is meant to be enjoyed, not paranoid about. I think once he eventually gets more comfortable with his bike and starts realizing he's in control, he'll start pushing himself slowly but surely.

It's definitely not something you'd want to force though. That would throw the fun factor of riding right out of the window for him. I'd say just let him take his time, he'll be back.
 
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