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Discussion Starter #1
Well, I've got about 75 miles of experience now and the only aspect that I can't get right is coming to a smooth stop. For example, sometimes I have to put my right foot down first. Please share some expertise with me.
 

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you just need more miles of riding experience. you're developing an incredible number of skills, including, significantly, your balance. if you're really desperate to get this under control right away, i can only recommend adding to your riding experience in a parking lot going slow--practicing slow starts and slow stops.
 

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you will get to the point where you can do this with the front brake, but for now when riding under 10 or 20mph, try just using the back brake.

You will stop much more smoothly
 

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spiceboy said:
you will get to the point where you can do this with the front brake, but for now when riding under 10 or 20mph, try just using the back brake. You will stop much more smoothly
That's a cop out and the wrong way to do it. When coming to a stop always be smooth with the lever and pedal, don't pump them. Also as you are almost stopped release a little pressure so the bike levels out, just like you would in a car (I am assuming you do that like all good drivers do). Try not to get the big rebound when completely stopped. It takes time, try it. :D
 

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also, make it a habit of puttin left foot down first. this keeps your right foot on the rear break until the very last moment. You never know when you are going to need that extra bit of breaking power.
 

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It's not rocket science but it is skill development. At this stage of your riding experience (I'm assuming 75 miles is the grand total of the miles you've put on a bike, ever.) you don't know anything. Not a flame there, just the truth.

Chances are your brain is processing more information than ever before while operating a motor vehicle. You need practice and solid advice. Stay out of high stress areas like crowded streets or freeways. Do not ride during rush hours. There's too much to process too quickly and you don't have a "reactive skill set" yet.

While in your car you should practice watching traffic and anticipating movement. Watch how people check (or don't check) their mirrors before changing lanes, learn which cars are more likely to antagonize you than others - example, zipped up Honda Civics with a gallon paintcan exhaust and ground effects with a MTX sticker covering the rear window will want to race you alot more than grandma Moses in her Crown Victoria, but both can be dangerous.

Get with a mentor rider, someone well seasoned who is responsible and will ride with you and help you through this most important phase of development, stay away from stunters. Ride safe.
 

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JetBlast10 said:
It's not rocket science but it is skill development. At this stage of your riding experience (I'm assuming 75 miles is the grand total of the miles you've put on a bike, ever.) you don't know anything. Not a flame there, just the truth.

Chances are your brain is processing more information than ever before while operating a motor vehicle. You need practice and solid advice. Stay out of high stress areas like crowded streets or freeways. Do not ride during rush hours. There's too much to process too quickly and you don't have a "reactive skill set" yet.

While in your car you should practice watching traffic and anticipating movement. Watch how people check (or don't check) their mirrors before changing lanes, learn which cars are more likely to antagonize you than others - example, zipped up Honda Civics with a gallon paintcan exhaust and ground effects with a MTX sticker covering the rear window will want to race you alot more than grandma Moses in her Crown Victoria, but both can be dangerous.

Get with a mentor rider, someone well seasoned who is responsible and will ride with you and help you through this most important phase of development, stay away from stunters. Ride safe.
+1. Well put JetBlast10.
 

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+3. Didn't take the words out of my mouth cuz I'd have said something really smartassed...but definitely solid advice. One of the most important things is to have someone to ride with who knows what they're doing. There are a lot of things that I do now that I never would even have thought about before I started riding.
 

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To quote Keith Code - With only 75 miles of riding experience how much attention are you using to just stop the bike vs what’s going on around you? I'd say about $0.95 out of a $1 worth of attention.

I highly recommend you attend a MFS course and pick-up Keith Code’s book A Twist of the Wrist. It’s a little out dated, but still a ton of good info.

Also here some more good books to read: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1893618072/ref=pd_sim_books_1/103-3555528-7634207?v=glance&s=books & http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0760314039/ref=pd_sim_books_2/103-3555528-7634207?v=glance&s=books
 

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All good advice. I have taken the class and have read Keith Code's first book and Lee Park's book. I see now that my difficulty has been in the shocks' rebound when I come to a stop. Next time I take the bike out, I'll try easing off the lever more smoothly at the last few feet of braking.
 
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Are you downshifting to the stop? Or holding the clutch in and coasting to a stop?

The reason I'm asking is because I rarely use the break. I more so ... roll off the gas.. only at the last second I use brake. When I pull the clutch in to stop.. Sometimes I don't put my foot down at all. I just sorta tap both front and rear and balance and roll with the bike in first gear. I make sure that I have made a complete stop at the line and then take off... I also do that alot on my road and mountain bicycles... But with those clipless pedals It's a bitch because you can't put your foot down if you fall! lol
 

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when you're coming to a stop gradually get in the front brakes harder and harder in smooth fashion, then left yourself up off the seat and forward, you'll start to feel the back end following.....oh wait you want to know how to stop, not endo... :twisted:
 

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not to add too much thought to all this, but remember your brake lever (like your throttle and clutch) is not an on/off switch. be smooth! you don't crack the throttle from 0 to WOT every time you leave from a stop. do the same w/ your brakes. smoothly apply your brakes.

smartass comment coming on... of course, for you racers, this may not always apply. running behind? trying to get past that one guy in front of you? heading down the straight, sharp turn coming up, you need to get ahead. he gradually applies the brakes to brush off a little speed. you wait...wait...wait... now grab a big 'ole handful! there you go! now you've thrown the block and stuffed him in the turn. and you're ahead. :bitchslap: sorry, i'm bored at work and daydreaming...
 

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The most important advice you have gotten yet is for you to attend an MSF class...We have very experienced riders here and i respect their opinions but the safest place to harness ur skills would be in a closed , controlled environment where u have someone scrutinizing what you are doing right and/or wrong and they can help u shed the bad habits before they get too bad....
 

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cvlighthouse said:
I rarely use the break. I more so ... roll off the gas.. only at the last second I use brake.
So no one behind you knows you are stopping because your brAkE light never come on until your almost stopped? :roll: Have fun putting rings in the engine, brake pads work better and are cheaper. :idea: Don't forget to stock up on tail faings and riging gear from getting rear ended. Seriously, use your brakes to stop, thats why you have 2 big ones up front. :D Cagers NEED to know you are slowing, they are asleep and cant stop as well as us(assuming you know how to stop well). :lol2:
 
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Ok, so I use my brake light. But, I was always taught to downshift when comming to a stop. It saves the brakes and gives you more control...
cant stop as well as us
I thought they had the same stopping distance..
 

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You should downshift but not necessarily let out the clutch, what you are doing by downshifting is having the bike in the right gear to GO if you have to. 'Saves the brakes'.....????? Yep, saves a $20 set of pads that you can change opposed to wearing a part of the bike that is meant to make it go, rings bearings etc. Brakes to stop dude, thats what theyre for :idea:
 
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