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I bought my 07 600RR brand new with 1 mile on her in New Orleans, LA. Ran the bike street and track for about 13,xxx miles no problems. I just moved to Denver, CO and I am experiencing a HUGE loss of power. Taking off from the lights the bike damn near stalls if i dont rev it up a bit and power delivery all throughout the RPM range is "boggy". Are all bikes this bad in high altitude????? Only power mods are Leo Vince slip-on, -1 front sprocket, and I did remove the exhaust servo but like I said its throughout the entire RPM range. Am I going to have to break down and buy a Power Commander and air filter or is there another way?
 

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dont take what i say as law.
air is thinner at higher altitudes. Your bike is accustomed to a specific fuel air mixture using air that is thicker. Now that you live in a new region with a higher altitude and thinner air, could it be that the thin air is messing with your fuel air mix and making your engine run really rich/boggy? maybe you should remap your fuel/air to make up for the thinness of the air in your current location.

just a thought :)
 

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I have a stock (in terms of fuel management) 07 and my bike runs just fine up here. You have to figure you're probably used to power delivery at sea level and when you come up here the thinner air will make your bike feel not as responsive and it won't produce as much power. Might just take some time getting used to your bike again. I know when I took my car down in elevation it was a monster, then back up to a mile high and its back to "normal".
 

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yeah the higher you go the less power you will have. have you cleaned your air filter and what not to make sure it's not something very simple?? You can re-map your ECU or get a power commander and go that route to try to get some power back into it....
 

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Try to reset the ECU of the bike. So disconnect the battery and let it sit for 10-15 minutes, reconnect and the ECU should reset. ECU's do learn as you ride, so that might be the problem.
 

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Try to reset the ECU of the bike. So disconnect the battery and let it sit for 10-15 minutes, reconnect and the ECU should reset. ECU's do learn as you ride, so that might be the problem.
yep this is the route i would go, the bike is accustomed to sea level amounts of air. Resetting the ECU will allow it to forget current memory.
 

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I would reset the map and then wait about a week for the comp to re learn the new air. The higher altitude should not effect power if its tuned properly.
 

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Our bikes don't 'learn' what their mixture should be.... its fixed in a map that cannot be reset.

At higher altitude your atmosphere is at a lower pressure meaning less oxygen is available...

HOWEVER.... your mixture shouldn't be to much of an issue for you as the bike references its mixture off the MAP (manifold absolute pressure) sensor which by its very nature will compensate the mixture for the difference in altitude... how many times can you say 'mixture' in one sentence? :)

If you want to get it running at %100 again you will simply need to get a BMC/K&N filter and a tune at the higher altitude... provided there isn't something else going on here as well.

What this will do is allow more air to get into the bike and ensure that the correct a/f ratio is maintained.
 

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welcome to Denver man, i have never ridden a sea level but im sure its just a mental thing. maybe try re mapping but besides that you probley just need to twist the throttel more.

hit me up if you are looking to do some riding canyons are looking good.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I talked to a tech at Fay Myers (local Honda shop) and he more or less said there is less air up here....period. I won't get that full power back. A Power Commander and air filter will help but will not get the bike back to what it was at sea level (below sea level in New Orleans). And that disconnecting the battery (resetting ECU) won't do anything. But just because i'm a hard head i'm going to disconnect it anyways and probably get the PCV and a BMC air filter. I'll let you all know how it comes out. Always up for a ride, shoot me a PM when you have some time to go.
 

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Less O2 = less power

The guys in WSBK say that when they come to Salt Lake City it's like the bikes are running on 3 cylinders. If wasn't for the altitude they would be well over 200 mph at the end of the main straight.

If it was fixable they would be doing it.
 

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Less O2 = less power

The guys in WSBK say that when they come to Salt Lake City it's like the bikes are running on 3 cylinders. If wasn't for the altitude they would be well over 200 mph at the end of the main straight.

If it was fixable they would be doing it.

:+1:

I agree. Just move back to LA
 

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Also run a lower octane fuel as well if you've been running premium. That's why the octanes go down lower out there than most other places (ie 85 octane). That should help some too. Try the lowest octane and if it pings, go to the next one up until it stops
 

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Hmmm, have never heard anything about the octane. I will have to try it out. And move back to LA? I think not sir, more like start preshopping for that Repsol......
 

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Try to reset the ECU of the bike. So disconnect the battery and let it sit for 10-15 minutes, reconnect and the ECU should reset. ECU's do learn as you ride, so that might be the problem.
exactly what i was going to say. you can totally disconnect the battery its easy but you really only need to disconnect 1 terminal, most places say disconnect the negative side (though i never understood that. if somebody knows why "they" say disconnect the negative instead of the positive i am interested)
 

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exactly what i was going to say. you can totally disconnect the battery its easy but you really only need to disconnect 1 terminal, most places say disconnect the negative side (though i never understood that. if somebody knows why "they" say disconnect the negative instead of the positive i am interested)
Not going to do anything...

And the reason you disconnect the negative first is to prevent you from shorting the battery out to the frame with whatever tool you are using to undo the bolt on the battery post.

Not really a high risk of doing on our bikes but when you are doing so on a car with a spanner then it quite often happens... if you do short it out and it gets a good connection it can vaporise a spanner in no time with the amount of current that gets drawn, which I assume would be a bad thing while its in your hand...
 

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before i bought my 600rr i rented one out in denver for a week and fell in love with it. couple months later back in jersey i bought one and it was so much faster here at sea level.

i rode my cousin's r1 out there at the even higher elevation levels up by rocky mt national park and couldnt believe how much the elevation kills the performance.
 

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i will say when i rented a 636 in Arizona as i got up into the mountains with it, it seemed to kinda bog down, but there were so many different things going on it was over 100 degrees a couple of the days and i went riding in the mountains 1 day and another day i just played around Scottsdale then went east for a bit. i wasn't really on the bike long enough to know how it normally acted.
 

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Less O2 = less power

The guys in WSBK say that when they come to Salt Lake City it's like the bikes are running on 3 cylinders. If wasn't for the altitude they would be well over 200 mph at the end of the main straight.

If it was fixable they would be doing it.
Exactly. The higher you go the less o2 there is in a given volume of air. The bike ingests the same volume of air regardless of altitude.

Ditto the re-mapping for altitude. There is no real fix other than going back down to SL. A turbocharger would make your bike less susceptible to altitude related power loss for sure though :)
 

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loFl at everyone saying it's a "mental" thing or in his head. I usually stick to trackdays but I have a few friends that drag race and will occasionally go with them just for fun to do something different and get away from base. It's weird that people on here are saying that it's in his head or just so "reset the ecu" and everything will be good, cause the nhra says otherwise. my 1/4 goes from a 10.80 (at 3700) to about a low 10.4 (at sea level). it's incredible the lack of knowledge on this forum, people taking stabs in the dark and guessing and the coming on and posting where impressionable people read their crap

:cursin:

YOU WILL LOSE POWER AS YOU INCREASE ELEVATION. LOSS O2 TO MIX = LESS POWER no way around it. my 600 can power wheelie at sea level, at 3900ft you have to cut throttle or clutch. my r1 will come up through 4th at sea level which weakens out to about a strong throttle in 2nd (no clutch or bounce). if you brought a turbo vehicle (aka not 99.95% of bikes) they handle it better. n/a motors don't do hot.
 
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