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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I went from this:


to this:


to now this after my second track day


what else do I need to improve on. I felt relaxed going around the track but found myself trail braking... Big mistake this early in the learning stages. Advanced riders, I'm listening to your sugestions :shakehand
 

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Keep your arms loose is one trick....keep the inputs light on the hands. The best thing to do is on the straights flap your elbows like a chicken.

The big thing I see is your hips are off the bike but your shoulders and head are still behind the windscreen aka crossed-up. In the right conditions this could cause a lowside. You want to put your head typically, right where your mirror would be. Your outside arm should be almost extended straight, using only your thumb, middle and index finger for throttle control. In a left hand turn, imagine your throttle hand as operating a screwdriver.

Make sure your hips aren't sliding around the gas tank as opposed to moving your hips straight out...

This is me doing it wrong...



And this is the ideal position

 

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You need to get off the seat more, and try to get your upper body down lower.
yup. get down a little more and try moving your head and upper torso out a little more too. when hanging off, you want to be parallel with the bike, otherwise you'll be riding all twisted.
 

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Read+watch a twist of the wrist by Keith code. I sound like a broken record but it'll systematically go through how one can improve their riding skills...but yea don't swivel around the tank with your hips, sit back a little bit (fists distance between your croch and the tank) and hang of just half a butt cheek, too much hanging can cause problems too. Use your legs to grip the tank and hang on ratherthan your arms, this will eliminate excess rider input into the handlebars and improve stability. Your own style will develop as you go along, but def pick up a copy of that book!
 

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Frill-Dog wrote:
In a left hand turn, imagine your throttle hand as operating a screwdriver.
That's good advice, except that you should have said ....In a Right hand Turn.

Also, to the OP, it's hard to tell from the picture of exactly where you are on the track (what part of the turn), but it appears that you should tighten up your line toward the apex somewhat. Again, it's hard to tell where you are on the track by the picture, but it appears that you are maybe not looking through the turn quite enough. As stated in some of the other posts, try and get your upper body down towards the tank further and make sure that you also move your upper body out, along with your butt. The old "kiss your mirrors" saying will help on this part of it. Keep you grip loose. Your hands are NOT there to grip the clipons, they are there to operate the brake, throttle, and clutch. Grip your clipons like your were shaking hands with a small child or a baby.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
so pretty much by lowering my chest and seating further back would remedy most of my problems then :dontknow:
 

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And this is the ideal position

That is far from ideal, in fact there is no "right" but there is a wrong. every person is gonna have a different body position. everybody rides differently. You need to find what works for you. I know of a couple small framed people that they do twist around the tank, inside knee against the fairings and head almost down by their inside hand. Its their riding position, I, being a little larger than them can not do it that way, but its what works for them, and they are a LOT faster than me.

You have to try different things and see what works for you.

More improtantly than getting your butt off the seat is getting your head down. that is where the mass is, when your head gets down the rest of your body is gonna follow. As you get faster things will change, but the one thing that never changes is the right line. Most important thing. You can go slow on a fast line but you cant go fast on a slow line. Worry more about track orientation than anything else right now. In the long run it will pay off.
 

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More improtantly than getting your butt off the seat is getting your head down. that is where the mass is, when your head gets down the rest of your body is gonna follow. As you get faster things will change, but the one thing that never changes is the right line. Most important thing. You can go slow on a fast line but you cant go fast on a slow line. Worry more about track orientation than anything else right now. In the long run it will pay off.
:+1: The number one thing that's more important than body position is making sure you are on the right/correct race line. After that, smooth inputs(throttle, steering, braking, shifting weight, etc). Anything that you do has an effect on the bike and it gives you different feedback from one input to the next.

Don't get me wrong, having a decent body position is good and important, but the other things will help you become a better rider faster.
 

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Don't overload yourself with too much stuff. Pick a few things to work on, and execute them to the best of your ability.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I pick something to work on every session. Like I said before, I'm comfortable out there and I don't ride above my head.
 
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