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how much longer do you guys think inline 4 engines will be the standard for Japanese sport bikes?

after hearing reviews of the new R1 engine (yeh, i know its still an inline 4) I am wondering if its going to kick off shift in bike engine design.

perhaps some v-4 (or v5?) engines, or some other configuration that offers more torque and midrange power.
 

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That's kind of a confusing topic. Theoretically an inline should produce more torque because it doesn't have to combat the torque-robbing effects of a V-designed engine, such as negative inertia from the conflicting rod angles and the neglect for mass equilibrium. Torque is dependent on too many factors, such as design of crank weights, the linear distance covered by the crank per rotation, crank/rod/cylinder continuity and blah blah blah. Also, wheel-torque is almost completely drivetrain dependent. If you have improper gearing your torque numbers will suffer. Not to be confused with crank-based torque, however, which is measured without a drivetrain attached.

Not to focus on one part of your post, though, as V-engines sound pretty mean (Harley's excluded).
 

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That's kind of a confusing topic. Theoretically an inline should produce more torque because it doesn't have to combat the torque-robbing effects of a V-designed engine, such as negative inertia from the conflicting rod angles and the neglect for mass equilibrium. Torque is dependent on too many factors, such as design of crank weights, the linear distance covered by the crank per rotation, crank/rod/cylinder continuity and blah blah blah. Also, wheel-torque is almost completely drivetrain dependent. If you have improper gearing your torque numbers will suffer. Not to be confused with crank-based torque, however, which is measured without a drivetrain attached.

Not to focus on one part of your post, though, as V-engines sound pretty mean (Harley's excluded).
That's what I always say.
 

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the only difference in the r1 motor is the crossplane crank & the irregular firing order, they didn't steer away from the inline motor. v-4's are expensive motors & if the big four get into them you'll see prices skyrocket even more than they are now (i remember when 6'ers were $7200) you may see some trickle technology from the other 3 big companies but i don't think a completely new motor design will take place
 

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The next big change from the Japanese, especially Honda will be in the trany's. Honda is already talking about a automatic for sportbikes or even a CVT, I heard they are looking into dual clutch systems like in the cars. Everyone bitched when Honda announced ABS and everyone will bitch when the autos come out.
 

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Everyone bitched when Honda announced ABS and everyone will bitch when the autos come out.
Yes they did, but man, just think of how many novice riders are going to love those ABS brakes when they have to mash on the front lever and find themselves not face first in the asphalt with a 400 pound, hot motorcycle on top of them. Do you think the riding excitement will still be there with a CVT/Auto tranny mounted on our bikes or will it gradually dissipate?
 

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Yes they did, but man, just think of how many novice riders are going to love those ABS brakes when they have to mash on the front lever and find themselves not face first in the asphalt with a 400 pound, hot motorcycle on top of them. Do you think the riding excitement will still be there with a CVT/Auto tranny mounted on our bikes or will it gradually dissipate?
I tend to have more faith in Honda then most, so I think it'll be fine. I knew Honda wouldn't screw up ABS and I was right, so I feel the same about the auto/cvt. I do hope they leave it as an option like ABS though.
 

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If Honda can compensate for the loss of power (both hp and torque) that shadows a typical move from a sequential gearset to a variable or fully automatic transmission then they should be in the clear. However, given the specific marketing strategies (strictly on a sportbike theorem) by Honda targeting the younger, less self-preserving generations, the CVT/Auto option might not take flight. Having it as an option is almost a necessity.
 

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i like triumph's 3 cylinder engines. really distinct sound too.
Beat me to it. The Daytona 675 is a great bike, along with the Speed Triple. Triumph makes a good motorcycle.
 

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an auto sportbike...oh no...
the only thing keeping all my friends from riding my bike is because none of them know how to work a clutch.
auto bikes would just pussify everything (in my opinion)
 

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Your missing the point of a CVT guy - thats maximum torque at whatever speed/rpm your at because the transmission is continously adjusting itself to whatever your doing. Sure, shifting is fun but just imagine rideing around continously at the engines sweet spot... it would be interesting, that's all I'm saying.
 

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Your missing the point of a CVT guy - thats maximum torque at whatever speed/rpm your at because the transmission is continously adjusting itself to whatever your doing. Sure, shifting is fun but just imagine rideing around continously at the engines sweet spot... it would be interesting, that's all I'm saying.
Torque levels with a CVT transmission depend on what type of CVT they are using. A typical Reeve-driven CVT transmission generally take a torque loss due to the characteristics of the pulleys when they are being adjusted. Also, if the CVT requires a torque converter, as in those partial roller-type ones, then that also creates a slight loss in torque. A ratcheting or cone type CVT will yield the best torque percentages, but there is still an rpm buffer for them to work efficiently. Needless to say, to make these transmissions run as smooth as they do, you lose about 200-300 rpm in uninhibited engine response. Not to mention that if a bike equipped with a CVT has transmission failure, the repair costs might put you in the market for a new ride. Besides, the point of a CVT is to keep an engine in it's optimal operating range for efficiency (ie: fuel economy and low emissions), not its optimal torque range.
 

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Whats to compensate for loss of power, they already have a loss of power already with the 09 600rr, so i dont think thats issue for them now...:(

fistly they need a slipper clutch before anything, especially a auto in there. if they cant afford a slipper how can they afford a auto..

but a V4 would be good, that rumour has been going for ages, and coming from having a V4 honda already (NC35/rvf400) all mechanics hate them in the sense on working on them, very little room to fix things, like you have to pull apart a hell of a lot more sompared to a normal inline 4..

my 2 cents worth, and i must say dissappointed in the HP loss of the new 600rr :(

If Honda can compensate for the loss of power (both hp and torque) that shadows a typical move from a sequential gearset to a variable or fully automatic transmission then they should be in the clear. However, given the specific marketing strategies (strictly on a sportbike theorem) by Honda targeting the younger, less self-preserving generations, the CVT/Auto option might not take flight. Having it as an option is almost a necessity.
 

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By compensating, I meant to make up for the additional power that will be lost due to the transmission type, or at least remain at the '09 figures, however painful they may be. Besides, a CVT transmission generally costs less to mass-produce and they require little maintenance (consequentially, they are expensive to repair because of the design), so ownership costs will also be less.. until it breaks.
 
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