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Discussion Starter #1
Hello!

I recently picked up a CBR600RR 2005, which was in good condition with 17000kms on it. The first owner had owned it for the first 15000 and taken gentle care of it. The second owner I suspect didn't take enough care of it.

However, when I checked it out it was in good shape, behaved really well and I didn't have any issues at all. Took it home, rode it the very short distance I have to work for a few days, before I took it for a longer run. It started acting up after twenty minutes or so, started out running bad on low rev, power coming and going and overall jerky acceleration. After a few more minutes it died on low rev, which made me suspect that the battery wasn't getting charged.

I made my way home (had to walk it the last couple of hundred meters) and charged the battery, to try to find the issue. Surprisingly, it DID charge - somewhat. At 5k/7k/9k it charged between 13.1 and 13.28. At idle the voltage dropped from 12.44~ to 12.08~.

Very odd. I took it out to another trip, exactly the same thing as last time. This time it almost caused some major issue though, as the power went out during revving through a corner...

I made my way home, and measured it again. This time I revved it to 7k and held it.

It charged 13.22 - however, the voltage dropped to 5.5 and then 0 within a second, and the bike died. After it died it went up to 12.0.

However, it should never die during 7k RPM as it's charging.

Could it be the rectifier, or the alternator?

Thanks in advance.
 

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First make sure that the battery isn't from the previous century or just plain dying. Typically those are good for ~5 years. There should be some date either stamped or stickered on the battery. If not, take it to your local auto parts store and have them run a battery check.

You can check the output of the alternator with a multimeter by probing AC voltage across each of the wires coming out of it. There's three wires and the voltage between all pair combinations should be around 60V AC at mid rev. That number may be a bit off since I'm basing my knowledge on another bike but it's up there. You're basically checking to make sure there's some voltage at the coils and none are shorted anywhere. For this test though you will need a known good battery because the wires you're probing are going to be disconnected from the R/R and for the duration the bike's going to be running purely off the battery.

Once you've eliminated both the battery and the alternator as potential culprits then it's likely the R/R. But someone else is going to have to chip in on how to diagnose that since I've never had to deal with it. On one of my previous bikes the R/R was just plain ol' dead so there wasn't much of diagnosing.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
First make sure that the battery isn't from the previous century or just plain dying. Typically those are good for ~5 years. There should be some date either stamped or stickered on the battery. If not, take it to your local auto parts store and have them run a battery check.

You can check the output of the alternator with a multimeter by probing AC voltage across each of the wires coming out of it. There's three wires and the voltage between all pair combinations should be around 60V AC at mid rev. That number may be a bit off since I'm basing my knowledge on another bike but it's up there. You're basically checking to make sure there's some voltage at the coils and none are shorted anywhere. For this test though you will need a known good battery because the wires you're probing are going to be disconnected from the R/R and for the duration the bike's going to be running purely off the battery.

Once you've eliminated both the battery and the alternator as potential culprits then it's likely the R/R. But someone else is going to have to chip in on how to diagnose that since I've never had to deal with it. On one of my previous bikes the R/R was just plain ol' dead so there wasn't much of diagnosing.
Hello Lyoha! Thank you for the reply.

I forgot to mention, the battery is brand new. It was changed by the previous owner, which further makes me suspect that there's something wrong with either the R/R or alternator.

When you're saying that the voltage between all wires should be 60V A/C, I assume I can just probe it with a multimeter in any order I please (as in, wire A / B / C independantly of any ground or R/R)?

And, mid rev = 5-7k?

I'll check the alternator and get back here!

Thanks again.
 

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There's two ways you can probe the alternator. One is by measuring resistance between a ground and a, b, then c and also between a/b, a/c, and b/c with the bike off. What you're looking for here is a short, or in other words no resistance. Another way is while the bike is running and ac voltage between a/b, a/c and b/c. I prefer to do the latter because it gives me more useful information than just resistance probing. And yeah, 5-7k is plenty to spool the alternator to give a decent ac voltage output. Just be careful not to zap anything

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The resistance of the stator coils isn't a useful test. They are going to read sweet **** all if they are good or shorted. The only thing you may find is an open loop or ground fault.

Either way, if it's not open or grounded your test is likely to be inconclusive.


Check voltages with the bike running. You can lose a coil and still have charging current, just not sufficient charging current.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well, just measured it. Cable A-B = 20ish at idle, 65ish at 5k, 75 at 7k.

A-C and B-C 0.01 no matter RPM. Feels like C is fubar.

Time to open up the stator. Anything to look for, or just replace?
 

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It's likely to be a replacement

You'll likely find a burnt winding


When you replace the stator make sure your battery is good. A bad battery can lead to charging system damage. So do your diligence and make sure the entire system is healthy
 

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A bit late to the party but what wibbly said. Unless you REALLY feel like rewinding them yourself...

^That's in jest. It's a b!tch of a job.
 

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My 2009 did this same thing. 1 phase only output 7 VAC and the rest was 20-80VAC. I bought a new stator and flywheel. I have not finished installing both parts yet.
 
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