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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Performance Riding Techniques by Andy Ibbott
Twist of the Wrist by Keith Code
Twist of the Wrist II by Keith Code
Total Control by Lee Parks
The Soft Science of Road Racing Motorcycles by Keith Code

So far I'm halfway through the first one on the list and it is really interesting. I've only done two days worth of track school up here in Montreal (FAST riding school) and I find this helps to fill the gap.

Anyone else have read these books?
 

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Hahahah, I love Performance Riding Techniques. I got a buddy of mine pissed off at me at BeaveRun after I read that book. He couldn't pass me because I was blocking the **** out of him. :icon_lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I finished Performance Riding Techniques today. I took about 10 pages of notes. After reading each book, I'm gonna take notes on what's useful. By summertime, I'm going to have a solid action plan on how to improve my riding.

My review on Performance Riding Techniques is that it's very explicit with images to explain all the principles of track racing. It also has plenty of useful quotes from MotoGP riders about each topic to support the ideas and arguments. It's definetly NOT geared towards road riders. It focused purely on track racing. It even covers how to mind screw your oponents in the pits :) All that being said, I find that the book is not too well organized. For example, if you're looking for all the advice on how to position your body when braking, its spread over many chapters on different topics such as acceleration, braking, steering and cornering. So when I was taking notes to improve my riding, it was hard to get all the information organized. All in all, a great read. I have a lot to work on in 2009 already!

Since you all say that P.R.T. is the best book of the lot, I guess all the others will fall short of my expectations. But keep posted, I'll be reporting on them soon enough. Next on the list: Twist of the Wrist I by Keith Code...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Dude, stop thinking so much. 10 pages of notes?? Just ride!
You're right. And that brings me to the second book. Twist of the Wrist by Keith Code. I just finished it. He actually mentions that you should take a couple of laps to just have fun and relax. By doing so, some fo his students have improved their lap times. But just having fun won't bring you satisfaction in the long run if you wanna be fast.

Twist of the Wrist I is a much better book than Performance Riding Techniques if you need a solid gameplan to understand how to improve your lap times and confidence. I won't go into details, but if I had to suggest just one book, this would be it.

I will read Twist of the Wrist II to see what else Keith Code had to say on the subject. Some people say the second book is just a revision of the first.
 

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Yea I'm not really one of those people who goes out each session with one specific thing or corner to work on lol. I just go out and try to ride faster then my buddies and so far my times have continued to improve. :book1:
 

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books are a fine reference but still nothing can beat a good riding instructor & lots of practice at the track. acquiring a high skill level just means you have to burn lots of gas & wear out a lot of rubber than the next guy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
You guys are right. I can't wait to hit the track next summer.

I'm done reading Twist of the wrist II. It's a lot different than the first and helped me understand better what I should focus on when riding the track.

The first book is focused on where to spend your attention. The second book is on how to counter your natural reactions (example: letting the off the throttle, being tight on the handlebars, etc..)
 
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