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gotta log in to view.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited by Moderator)
Seriously? I wasn't logged in. Anyways here it is. It's kinda long.


LA Times article said:
YOUR WHEELS
Bikers playing fast and loose

Motorcycle crash fatalities are rising fast -- and it's not just the cyclists who are dying.
By Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writer
November 29, 2006


A distraught husband, three daughters, dozens of friends and hundreds of students are trying to come to grips with the death of Elisa Gigliotti.

A Suzuki racing bike screaming at 80 mph in a 25-mph zone slammed into Gigliotti on Oct. 4 as she was leaving her job at Long Beach City College, igniting a fireball inside her Ford Escort.

Gigliotti, a professor who taught Spanish and Italian at three local community colleges, was pulled from the burning wreckage in front of the college by two fellow instructors. But she was already covered with second- and third-degree burns on her face, chest, arms and legs — more than half her body. After 30 days, she died at the burn unit of the Torrance Memorial Medical Center.

"It is not uncommon to see these kinds of accidents with motorcycles, particularly high-powered super bikes," said Raymond Dennison, the Long Beach detective who investigated the crash. "The whole function is to go as fast as they can."

In the last seven years, motorcycle fatalities have more than doubled nationwide. In 2005 alone, fatalities were up another 13%. The carnage only partly reflects the increasing popularity and growing registration of motorcycles.

In the Long Beach crash, the Suzuki GSX-R 1000 bike was operated by Raj Boren, a 21-year-old student at the college, who died instantly.

According to eye witnesses, Boren accelerated with an open throttle from an intersection near the crash site. Dennison said his estimate of 80 mph at the time of impact was conservative. Boren possibly was exceeding 100 mph. The accident report puts the primary blame on Boren's speed.

The force of the collision lifted Gigliotti's car off the pavement, moved it 15 feet and rotated it 90 degrees. The point of impact was the passenger door, which was pushed in past the centerline of the vehicle. During the crash, the motorcycle's gas tank ruptured, filling the car with atomized fuel that exploded.

"I don't understand how something that unsafe can be on the road," said Lorenzo Gigliotti, who married the Italian-born Elisa 32 years ago when both were teenagers. "I look at how they market these things. That is a racing bike. It doesn't have any purpose to be on the street. It is a land torpedo."

Elisa Gigliotti was a well-liked optimist, full of energy. "We are taking it one day at a time," said her husband, a web designer who since the crash has created http://www.ourlisa.com . "Nothing is the same."

The GSX-R 1000 is one of Suzuki's premier racing bikes, the top of the GSX line widely used in the racing circuit. Long Beach police estimate it has a top speed of 180 mph, about 100 mph faster than the fastest posted speed limit on any highway in the nation. Suzuki does not publicize the bike's top speed.

With a suggested retail price of $11,400, it is much more affordable than any high performance racing car. Therefore, those who like speed, or want the challenge of controlling such power — or have a death wish — can get them.

But the risk is shared with the rest of the public.

"I have seen my fair share of accidents where the motorcycle hits so hard it kills everybody in a car," Dennison said.

According to a recent report by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, there were 4,553 fatalities in motorcycle accidents in 2005. Those deaths include only the operators and passengers on the bikes. Agency officials could not say how many pedestrians or people in other vehicles died in these crashes, though statisticians are trying to get the data at The Times' request.

The National Transportation Safety Board, the federal government's leading accident investigation agency, is looking into another grim motorcycle crash this year in Pennsylvania, in which four people inside a car died, said agency board member Deborah Hersman, who has taken an interest in motorcycle safety.

"People think that the people on the bikes are the only vulnerable ones," Hersman said.

Every motorcycle death and injury, even when limited to the operator, costs society plenty — both in the direct cost of the accident and in the loss of human potential.

"Many times, the crash doesn't kill the motorcyclist," said Jim Champagne, a spokesman for the Governors Highway Safety Assn. and head of the Louisiana Highway Safety Commission. "It leaves them as convalescents of the state."

On average, motorcyclists are 34 times more likely to die per mile traveled than occupants of cars, and it's getting worse. Over the last decade, the fatality rate per motorcycle mile has jumped 76%. That reflects an emerging motorcycle culture that embraces every possible danger factor: extreme speed, reckless behavior, alcohol impairment and many older riders past their prime, says Champagne.

Suzuki spokesman Glenn Hansen disputed that, saying motorcyclists do not embrace speeding or alcohol any more than operators of other vehicles. The company encourages safe behavior, he said. As for the sharp increase in deaths, Hansen said, "I can't say how these accidents happen, why they happen or what the causes are."

But motorcycle culture and even the news media often explicitly sanction the violation of public safety laws.

Take, for example, this recent upbeat review: "As I rocketed toward Angeles Crest Highway on California State Route 2 … I clicked into second, and cracked 100." The speed limit on that highway is 45 mph and lower in some places.

If the current trends persist, it seems reasonable to look for answers. It would be possible to limit the horsepower of motorcycles, but not politically feasible. After all, operators can take their bikes to off-road tracks and legally test their top speeds. So, the focus should be on stopping extreme speeding on public roads.

My suggestion: Instead of fines of a few hundred dollars, how about a $5,000 fine or vehicle forfeiture for exceeding the speed limit by more than 50 mph with any vehicle? It could take such penalties to get the message across that people like Elisa Gigliotti should still be alive.



[email protected]

 

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damn. they really do the whole we pay just a small amount of money for a death machine blah blah. **** them. what about joe ricer doing 45 in that 25...more damage, less speed.
 

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Hmmm. hypocrits i smell...if your gonna limit a bikes speed/hp, then you obviously need to limit every car/truck's speed/hp...She was going way too fast and be irresponsible..I hate to hear about the car driver...lets look at how many people have died from car/truck accidents in the past few MONTHS!!! So i tell put it in perspective or shut up
 

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i agree. bikes aren't the only speeders on the street. how come bikers are killed all the time by stupid drivers, yet nobody wants to pass any laws changing the way stupid drivers are allowed to get on the road?
 

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usmcr6 said:
damn. they really do the whole we pay just a small amount of money for a death machine blah blah. **** them. what about joe ricer doing 45 in that 25...more damage, less speed.
+++++++1. yeah.. what about those other people? whatever and phuck them. i bet she pulled on the biker just like that phucker in the van did me.. if she lived she would be sayin i didnt see him... shyt happens.. if some1 is goin 80 and they hit your side of the car, i think u werent payin attention.. rip lady, but all these blame the bikers phuckers r the ones who cant drive.. now yall deen got me started....
 

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the whore didn't yield the right of way... she came out from the driveway without a second look, she caused a poor motorcyclist to die.... he was only in his twenties... with so much left in this world, he would have found the cure for aids...

lol newspaper writing techniques
 

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Dang that's crazy! That was my old school!
 

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Mister Dirt said:
+++++++1. yeah.. what about those other people? whatever and phuck them. i bet she pulled on the biker just like that phucker in the van did me.. if she lived she would be sayin i didnt see him... shyt happens.. if some1 is goin 80 and they hit your side of the car, i think u werent payin attention.. rip lady, but all these blame the bikers phuckers r the ones who cant drive.. now yall deen got me started....
So what if she pulled out? It's not her fault in this case because she doesn't expect someone to be coming along at 80-100mph! If a cage pulls out and a biker hits you going the speed limit or even a little over, it's the cager's fault for not looking. But it's impossible to see a bike coming from such a long distance at those speeds in that area. Why would anyone expect that and if there was even a slight bend in the road or parked cars, there's no way she could've seen him. She may have checked to see if the road was clear, realized it was, then looked the other way to check. Then she pulls out not seeing anything coming and this idiot rips up the road at that speed. It's totally the biker's fault if he was really going that fast.
 

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mascu said:
the whore didn't yield the right of way...
You are a sad and miserable person for saying such a thing. The bike was doing 80 in a 25. There's a reason it was a 25. Do you not have the capacity to get that?
 

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YOU SEE THAT! ALL U ******* SQUIDS WHO COME IN HERE BOASTING OF STREET RACING AND OTHER STUPID **** DONE ON THE STREET! Listen to that, that is the sound of cops breathing down our ******* necks, of insurance prices going up (or the ever increasing companies that won't insure us), and the ever increasing risk that we will become painted as more of a public menace then cell phones (OR AT LEAST MADE TO BE BY THE ******* MEDIA WHO LATCHES ON TO EVERY STORY OF SOME DUMBASS KID WEARING NOTHING< TAKING NO RESPONSIBLITY FOR HIS ACTIONS AND NOT THINKING ABOUT THE ******* CONSEQUANCES OF DOING A 120 MPH WHEELIE DOWN A 45mph STREET!).

Listen to this ****, don't take it as encouragement because you DO NOT WANT WHAT U THINK U WANT> I don't want to be hunted down like a dog for riding a sportbike. I would like to enjoy my rights as a motorist just as everyone else but stupid d*mbass f*cks like this is what kills that. Every cop that pulls us over and hassles us for 5 over when everyone around us is doing 10-20 over on cellphones. Every time we get cut off and treated like second class motorists in an accident because people think we are at fault for "not seeing us," no THEY ******* LOOKED BUT THEY DIDN"T ******* SEE US BECASUE PEOPLE NEED TO OPEN THIER ******* EYES......


rant.... *gasp*....now..... *huff*....over..... *gasp*
 

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The same people who are saying it's the woman's fault are probably the same jokes that would do 80 mph in a 25. Sure, the woman pulled out in a main thru-way, so the bike has right of way. But who's to say she didn't look? Do you know how much ground you are covering at 80 mph?

You are traveling at 117 feet PER SECOND! And if he was indeed traveling at a higher rate, which is what I would surmise: 100 mph = ~150 ft per second. The reason for a 25 mph speed limit in that area is probably due to low visibility and density of population/businesses (where you have a lot of cross-traffic and pedestrians).

While she made an error in coming out onto thru-traffic, the biker was traveling at such a high rate of speed (reckless mind you) that both of them could not have avoided the accident. In other words, the biker placed BOTH motorists in a situation they could not avoid. The fact that the car exploded due to a ruptured gas tank is another piece of evidence against the biker. How fast must you go before you rupture a gas tank and crumple a door of a car to the mid-line of the car?

If you want to exceed reasonable speeds, take it to the track. And if you can't, then leave it in the garage. 80 mph on a bike or in a car is much faster than many can handle in the event of a panic situation. Most people (including you) don't even know how to negotiate a panic situation at 55 mph. Don't overestimate your abilities, because you probably don't have any.
 

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sooperman12 said:
...117 feet PER SECOND!...

While she made an error in coming out onto thru-traffic, the biker was traveling at such a high rate of speed (reckless mind you) that both of them could not have avoided the accident.
Exactly. Actually, she probably didn't even make an error. There was probably nothing there when she checked (assuming she did).

This biker's more of a moron for doing this near a school, where there are likely to be a huge number of pedestrians.
 

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I agree with the author's final points but god damn it did he have to crucify us like that with his basied writing like that?

I guess media will do anything to sell papers and get their points across. That is pretty irresponsible for that writer to do that. Infact I think I will e-mail him.
 

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Maaku said:
So what if she pulled out? It's not her fault in this case because she doesn't expect someone to be coming along at 80-100mph! If a cage pulls out and a biker hits you going the speed limit or even a little over, it's the cager's fault for not looking. But it's impossible to see a bike coming from such a long distance at those speeds in that area. Why would anyone expect that and if there was even a slight bend in the road or parked cars, there's no way she could've seen him. She may have checked to see if the road was clear, realized it was, then looked the other way to check. Then she pulls out not seeing anything coming and this idiot rips up the road at that speed. It's totally the biker's fault if he was really going that fast.
Amen to that, just because we're on two wheels doesn't mean we aren't accountable for our own actions. It isn't *always* their fault.
 

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A few of my favorite parts discussed from that Fair and Balanced article:

“It is a land torpedo.”

Funny, never that term for a crotch rocket, I mean, sportbike before.


“With a suggested retail price of $11,400, it is much more affordable than any high performance racing car. Therefore, those who like speed, or want the challenge of controlling such power — or have a death wish — can get them.”

Death wish? So if I want to cruse around my area at a leisurely pace or just “gas station pose”, I have a death wish? Maybe if you count the lady in the Surburban on the phone telling her 4 kids to shut up and watch Sponge Bob on the DVD while making a right turn in the left lane inches away from me. Ok yeah, I have a death wish, as in I wish people like that were dead.

"It leaves them as convalescents of the state."

You mean to tell me that the medical insurance I pay for won’t cover me if I have a motorcycle accident? They covered me when I sprained my knee playing racquetball. I need to talk to my insurance agent about this!!!

“alcohol impairment and many older riders past their prime”

This is the one that gets me. I totally agree that you should not have a drop of alcohol and throw a leg over your bike but what is the older riders past their prime statement for? What exactly is the prime age for motorcycling anyway? They just mentioned that the kid on the GSX-R was 21 so I am presuming they are implying he is too young for that bike. Are they going to take the endorsement off of my license when I reach a certain age or is that just if I ride a sportbike? I guess when you are a certain age, you have to trade in the CRB for a Goldwing. They never covered that at the MSF course.

sarcasm off………
 
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