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i was curious if anyone knows anything about the drag/downforce/lift properties that japanese bikes possess?
 

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no.
why do you want to know this?
were you thinking of putting on some air foils!

also, japanese bikes come in many shapes...im pretty sure a honda shadow and a honda cbr will have just a slightdifference in result.:retard::retard:
 

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this was on honda.com.

Form Follows Function
The new CBR600RR's stunningly innovative bodywork finds its origins in the wind tunnel. The design of the bodywork incorporates air-management principles derived from the wings and fins used on both fighter jets and Formula One race cars. The new shape more efficiently directs air around and through the CBR600RR's compact form while also giving visual cues to its aerodynamic function. The visible gap between the front upper cowl and the fairing's side cowls serves an important function: Because this section is divided into two parts, high-speed air resistance can be diverted into two smaller areas rather than influencing one large plane, thereby sharpening handling at higher speeds.

The shape of the front upper cowl is now more compact, with its nose and surrounding form repositioned 1.2 inches rearward and closer to the steering head compared to the 2006 model. The new lower cowl has also been made more compact, and it wraps more tightly around the exhaust headers. This design helps direct airflow for more effective cooling while visually emphasizing the CBR600RR's improved aerodynamics. This slimmer form also extends to the radiator, now 40mm narrower and 34.2mm taller. These compact proportions contribute to slippery aerodynamics while increasing cooling capacity.

The rear seat cowl is also significantly reduced in size and slimmed in shape. Combined with the shorter, more compact muffler and simplified lighting bracketry, this change helps reduce mass at the bike's extremities, contributing to more responsive handling.
 

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I could do a fluids model on the computers at school this week and give a rough estimate.

But,...

I do know for cars, at high speeds, there is sometimes a significant amount of lift. The rider on a bike in a tucked position is extremely aerodynamic and has a very small amount of drag, but I would guess there is also some lift.

Also, the windscreen contributes a significant amount of downforce, especially if you have a steeper double bubble shape.
 

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Here is a good article, in Summary bikes have about twice as much drag as cars!

http://www.sportrider.com/tech/146_0106_aero/index.html
Twice as much drag, yet a stock 600's power-to-weight ratio is what, roughly 4:1? 1ks+ obviously have an even lower power to weight ratio (Hayabusa is around 2.76:1). A fast car (3 Series BMW, Subaru STI etc..) will have around a 10:1 power-to-weight ratio.

Article was half-way interesting until I got to the part where it said the motorcycle wheels were not moving. Any real wind tunnel testing has both the wind blowing, plus the ground and wheels are moving to match the speed of the air flowing by. Major flaw by neglecting to do that in this test.
 

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I read an article a while back that said they ran into early problems with traction control programming on MotoGP bikes because they have so much power, with such terrible aerodynamic properties, that the rear tire was spinning faster than the front at 200+mph.
 

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My saddle bag on the back acts like a rear wing. at 135mph the front of the bike will start to lift up lol
 

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Physics major perhaps?! I always think of the aeros these bikes possess! Maybe it's because of me being in the design/engineering department and a love for physics? But yes, ALL sportbikes in particular stress important aeros. More than the cruisers but even they need some sort of aero to incorporate.
 

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The faster they go, the more aerodynamic they become due to the rider being submerged in the conical wind-current cavitation.
 

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i think the sheer badass-ness of the mohawk would stabilize not only the rider but the bike also because the wind would respect the mohawk. Out of this respect the wind would provide the right amount of downforce and find the path of least resistance around the bike. Therefore the "mohawked" rider can go faster. Lean lower. Wheelie longer etc.. just my .02 cents...
 

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i think the sheer badass-ness of the mohawk would stabilize not only the rider but the bike also because the wind would respect the mohawk. Out of this respect the wind would provide the right amount of downforce and find the path of least resistance around the bike. Therefore the "mohawked" rider can go faster. Lean lower. Wheelie longer etc.. just my .02 cents...


this quote is going right to the mohawk thread :crackup:
 
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