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so I just came home from sears & only bought one thing for my bike, was gonna buy this motorcycle stand but it didn't look like it was gonna work.anyway I bought a multimeter cuz I wanted one anyway. so here's the noob questionHOW THE HELL DO U USE THIS THING?!?!?!?!?!?
 

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black on negative red on positive? set it to volts or ohms w/e ure using it for and when the black / red are touched to their correct wires it should move positivly. if not i think you have them reversed if it goes backwards
 

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yeah pretty much that simple
set it to 12v and touch red to the + black to the -
it wont hurt anything if you do it backwards it will just give you a negative #

ohms measures resistance. this is useful when checking sensors, relays etc. the service manual will give you resistance measurements to check.
 

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not trying to be a tool bag,..........but it should have come with an owners/operator manual. READ IT. ok, it's not going to give you advanced diagnostic instructions, but it should give you basic operation instructions. also, if you run into any problem's or come up with questions from using it, the internet is FULL of info regaurding basic electronics.


to answer your question though, set it to the DC voltage setting, and have a go at it. also, make sure you don't use the amp setting unless you know the circuits ampreage. most meters go to 10amps. most circuit's on your bike carry more than 10 amps. if you measure a circuit with more amp's than the meter is capable of handling, you'll blow the fuse in the meter.

one other thing, if your measureing resitance (ohms), or your doing a continuity test, make sure you know what circuit you are testing. the ohm/continuity setting use a 9V (the continuity setting uses less than 9V, depending on the meter) current to check the circuit. if you mistakenly check a 5v circuit (I.E. ECM or inst. cluster), you can damage the component in that circuit. i always leave my meter in the 12v DC setting when not in use. that way i don't accidently send 9V to a 5v component if i'm not paying attention when i first "fire it up". good luck, and let us know if you get stuck with anything your working on. T.K.
 
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