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Discussion Starter #1
My first ride was 20 miles, the long back way home. I hit a major bump in the road and was amazed how the front absorbed the hit.

Lesson: Concentrate and pick a clean line in the road ahead. Keep well back from cars so you see potholes, camel humps, road kill, etc.

I got home and drained the oil. An UNBELIEVABLE amount of crap came out. It looked like metal flake paint only the flakes were all different sizes.

Lesson: Have a clean pan, fresh dino bike oil, and a clean funnel ready for when you arrive home with the new bike. No need to change the filter. Pour off most of the dirty oil and take the pan out into the sun. See all the pretty flakes? Someone has to get a picture of this and post it here.

CAUTION: The hot oil shoots forward out of the engine. Put the pan behind the front wheel and move it backward under the hole as it starts to slow. Hold the bike upright to finish draining or use a Pit Bull. Don't put the plug in too tight, someone cracked his engine case. $$$$$

I almost fell over the first few times I stopped. Hills can be a total bitch. Angled hills are worst.

Lesson: Downshift to first and hold the clutch on a hill. Use the rear brake so you don’t roll back on the start. With the bike in gear, you won’t have to switch sides for shift and brake.

After a few rides I tried to "throw" the bike into a 60 degree left turn at 40 mph. The bike turned 90 degrees into the oncoming lane. I corrected with a 90 degree right still on the wrong side of the road and gunned it. 2 seconds later I was back on my side of the road but going 60 mph heading for the guard rail. I eased the bike over 60 degree left and lived with a racing strip in my underwear till I got home.

Lesson: Look where you want to go, lean, and the bike will obey. No need to throw.

Later I almost missed a turn and grabbed the front and rear brakes at the same time and down shifted quick as I could. The front planted and the read hopped and swung to the right. The turn was a left, I was facing left so I dumped the clutch, let go of the brakes, gave it some gas, and saved my ass from a vicious high side.

Lesson: Two finger on the front and pull gently, let the front settle down for ½ second, then squeeze VERY gently front and engine brake the rear. The stopping force seem to up build on it’s own.

The next day, I did a recon on my favorite set of twisties, dips, and short chutes. I like to recon to check for police and other road hazards first. I did a U-turn on a short straight, ran 10,000 rpm in first, 13,500 in second and hit third hard. The bike rewarded me with a 2-3 ft wheelie for about 30 yards before I eased off and landed the front just a little off center.

Lesson: This bike forgives like no girl I ever knew, except my wife. She loves me, too.

Maybe it’s time I took me one of those riding courses?
 

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Maybe it’s time I took me one of those riding courses?

For sure! It's never a bad idea. No matter how long (or little) you've been riding, there's always more to learn. If you haven't taken MSF, get signed up. Every new rider should be required to take the course.

Congrats on keeping her upright, the RR is a blast to ride!

Now, surf on over to http://www.msf-usa.org/ :thumbup:
 

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Wow. Yeah the MSF course will help in every single aspect you've mentioned here. I can't count the number of times the MSF course has saved my life. Best $375 I've spent.
 

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Sounds like you definitely need to be taking the MSF course. From what I've read they teach you everything you need to know and you probably wouldn't have had to make a post like this if you would have taken it beforehand. I'm taking the course tomorrow and wednesday, and getting my 600RR on thursday (hopefully, if everything goes right at the honda dealer).

Have fun and be safe!
 

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HighLineCBR said:
Yes... i need to take the MSF course too. But every place i try is booked until August. :?
That sucks :( I didn't even think there was one in my area because I live in such a small town. I ended up calling last Friday and they said that I was just in time to make the one scheduled for this week. They said the next class taught in my area wouldn't be till the middle of May. I lucked out. :) And they only charge $100 in my town. The ones upstate are $125 or more.
 

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HighlineCBR,

I'mnot sure how far away you are from it but you might want to give Rockland Community Collge a try. They usually don't fill up too quicjkly on the MSF course.
 

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HighLineCBR said:
Yes... i need to take the MSF course too. But every place i try is booked until August. :?
Ask them if you can sign up, and magically appear at an earlier date, sometimes people dont go and there are seats open on the day classes begin.

That's what I was advised by the phone rep here.

Give it a shot.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
getting my 600RR on thursday
Great! Could you get a black pan (works best for contrast) and drain the oil at 20 miles. Let the dirty oil sit and carefully pour off most of the oil. Then take a flash picture of what was in the bottom of your engine and post it.

Anyone going for 600 miles for the first change want to try the same? I read alot of the flakes actually end up smashed and deposited in the engine. I wonder what still comes out.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Wow. Yeah the MSF course will help in every single aspect you've mentioned here. I can't count the number of times the MSF course has saved my life. Best $375 I've spent.
When you put it that way, I have to go. :oops: I was one who thought with my 4th bike and 30,000+ miles I could handel "a little 600". My last bike was a KZ900 that I still have. The KZ takes some muscle to turn or stop. A 600rr takes finesse.

I hope this helps some newer riders or someone swithcing to a sportbike.
 
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