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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New to the forum - but not to bikes, and wanted to share my "project" Cbr600RR
I sold a couple of bikes (2003 Hornet, and 1994 CBR600F2
So I decided to go bike hunting!!


I wanted something Post 2000, under £3000, that was fully road-worthy this time, so no wrecks (still working on my basket case Ninja). I wanted something fuel injected, as I had only ever owned a 125 with this before. It should be more reliable, ULEZ compliant (or capable of being so) for occasional trips to my work offices in the big smoke. It had to be a Honda (naturally), with more than 100BHP.


I toyed with looking at a couple of Fireblades that were local, but quickly decided that although appealing, I am not really experienced enough to start chucking a litre bike around, so decided on a 600cc, and as Fireblades were out, I started looking at CBR600F from 2010+ but struggled to find many in budget, but then I stumbled across a CBR600RR from 2005. It ticked all the boxes, and was up at £3000 about an hour away.

As we are in the CBR600RR forum, I guess you realised that it was the right bike for me!





So I grabbed the van, and went to go have a look.

Had a nosey around, lots of missing fairing bolts, some scrappy wiring, terrible Chinese copy exhaust, and a faulty rear indicator(+hyperflashing!). So I did an HPI check, came up fine, and then had a little ride around for about 15 minutes, and was quite happy it would do the business.
Stuck it in the van, no pics of this as I had a strap break on me during the drive home!! The damn thing tipped over in the back. Smashing a mirror, and cracking the fairing around the mirror mount... VERY annoying, so I doubled up on straps in a random layby. Lesson learnt here for sure. I have transferred many bikes this way by now, so I guess I was a little complacent about the skinny little straps I was using :(

So, she was home, just a little bruised!


I whipped off the broken mirror, ordered in replacements, and had a little mooch about in the more familiar setting.

This will not do:

Yeah, too loud, too stubby, and looks wrong for me. Off it comes!



Quickly had a look at the dodgy indicator. Swapped it over to the working rear, and it still was dead, so I whipped it open, and found the positive lead was loose and rattling about, so a quick solder job:


Bang on!


Whilst I was down here, found a few other little bodges, stuff like this:

Just generally a bit poorly executed, but nothing disastrous really.

This will not do though. Its on the list of things to finesse. I insulated and wrapped it all up neatly for now, and tucked it up out of sight with some zip ties to keep it secure.


This hole will need filling, don't want something too short, so will get a longer pipe, and cut it back to a custom length I reckon!

Replaced the flasher unit to sort hyper-flashing indicators


These keys are not going to cut it (hah!):

So I have ordered a couple of new un-cut keys. This bike has HISS, so I will need to swap over the chips to get them working once cut, but I am not confident this original working key would be worth relying on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Yeah, so this arrived, and was clearly too long. Not a problem, its much quieter!

I will use it for now, and I plan to cut off about 10/15 centimetres depending on how far out I want it to sit.

The new mirrors arrived - Damn! I rounded off one of the bolts, and no matter what I did, I would not budge. I used heat, extractors, mole grips, dremelled a slot, etc... Nothing would shift it..

I was reluctant to strip all the fairings off to weld a nut on, as it was getting late. So I got a couple of drying towels, got them damp, and made a hole in one. Wrapped up the front of the bike, stuck another bolt into the other side of the mount, to give me a decent and close earthing point (last thing I wanted to do was blow something up in the bike)

Mid Welding

She's ugly, but she worked!

Out!


New mirrors on - No harm done!


No one will ever know!


Did some boring replacement/correction of the fairing fixings:


Lots of these little bits were missing or using the wrong bolts/screws:


So I just worked my way around, and put in the correct bits all over:


Found this under the seat:


Rewarded myself with a late night shakedown :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Little update!

Had a little issue where the fuel gauge was not working, had a poke about, and checked the float was moving, and contacts all clean, nothing doing. I did need fuel anyway, so took it out to garage and filled it up. Went to start it, and it came on, then died straight away. Hmmm. Would not re-start and the dials were coming off and on (usually a low battery sign) and fuel pump was not priming. Had a good poke about, could not find anything. Very much felt like an electrical issue. So I asked a fellow biker for a push, and bumped it without issue, and rode it home to see if I could work it out :D

So, I pulled off the cowl, and front fairings, checking fuses/relays/etc. I found the clock connector was not 100% plugged in, so pushed that in, no change. I also noticed that the lights plastics have seen better days, so I have ordered a new set to swap out, also the little extra light at the top of the headlights was dead, likely a bulb, not got around to it yet.

After not seeing anything clearly wrong, I did a little googling, and found a few people mentioning that an earthing block around the seat was often the culprit of similar issues. So I took a look, and clearly it's been messed with before!


I turned on the bike and just moving it about had the clocks going off and on, and I heard the fuel pump prime - ah hah!!

I whipped off the connector, which was badly butchered:


Looks a little messy in here. This need some contact cleaner as a bare minimum.
The cooked part is likely from heating up from the poor connection. As it tested fine, and was not shorted or anything.

This is the bar that fits in the connector, sadly its plastic case was beyond repair. So I have removed it totally. I cleaned up one pin slightly, you can see how dirty it is.


Bit of sanding it all back for better contact


After using some contact cleaner, putting it in and out a few times, it felt a lot better!


Now, I could just leave this, and tape it up, but that's not how we do things :D

3d printed a little test cover for now. Friction fit, but nice and tight.


All tucked away and the bike is working great again!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Nice work. I love little projects like this and fault finding.
Ive never seen that colour scheme on an 05 before and I have to say it suits it! (y)
Cheers! They are almost certainly aftermarket fairings based on my findings so far! I may look at swapping them out to Rothmans type ones to match by NC23 :D
 

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Very nice. Having restored many 600rr's I love a good restoration post with pix.

Definitely aftermarket fairings as in 05 the bike came in black and red. And never with gold rims.

The livery looks more like the current model which only comes in this style in the U.S.

Just recently put on an AM set of that pattern on a '16 (the white seat cowl I had from another project).

Wheel Tire Automotive tire Automotive lighting Vehicle
 

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Wow, awesome work on repairs!!! I really like that paint-job, gives very modern look to bike! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
More to do! - Lets get this thing chopped down



Never done it before, so I measured where I wanted to cut:



Then decided top have a go at a bit that was destined to be chucked away with the angle grinder to see how that went, and what I would find inside...



Got the end off - will need to drill out the rivets, and remove the end to be used again later..



This is what I am left with, clearly the angle grinder was a tad optimistic..





So, I removed a load of the wadding with a blade, and then had to get on with a more delicate method for the proper cut, using a hacksaw would be slower, but likely a lot neater!



Took a little break to drill and tap out the end.



Got through it, took about 30 mins of hacksawing! I used a wrap of duct tape to act as a little physical guide to help create a tidy cut



Cut through the middle section, much more quickly



Then bash it all back together!



Refit!



Little bit louder, but quieter than the original pipe but looks a lot nicer in my opinion :)
 
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