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Middle of next month I am moving to Denver from New Jersey (27 amaxing hours). I have a Nissan Xterra pulling a newly aquired 1995 Haulmark 10x6 trailer enclosed trailer. What I am aquiring about here is what are the best practices for securing my bike in the trailer to survive. I will also be loading all my tools, a matress and boxes in the trailer. I have a bunch of ratchet straps, front and rear pit bull stands and a lot of 2x4's at my disposal. Anyone got any hot tips or pictures for me? What works, what doesn't?
 

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Got D-rings in the floor? Strap everthing down.

Quick story. I used to work at a chassis shop. We built 2 identical 25.5 chassis, basically pro-mod cars. Loaded them into an enclosed trailer that had everything from full tool boxes to spare motors, transmissions, everything. The motors were heavy, and on storage stands that sat flat, and the guys that loaded them with forklifts didn't secure them with straps because "they were heavy enough to stay put". Anyway, the rich dude that all this crap belonged to, rented a track just across the OK border to shake the cars down. So, off to the track we went. Two hours later when we got there, parked the trailer, began to open and unload everything. Opened the door to what looked like a bomb went off. These two huge motors were rolling around the whole trip, and destroying everything in their path. Tool boxes that were bolted to the floor, were on top of one of the cars, and tools everywhere. All the fiberglass parts of the cars, and thats most of the car, done. Make sure you strap everthing down. Makes for a nasty suprise if you dont.
 

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I know it costs a few bucks, but in my opinion, you cannot beat a Baxley wheel chock. I have two of the sport models and I transport mine and my wife's trackbikes 8 to 10 times a year. With the Baxley, you basically roll the bike into the chock, flip the locking lever, and add 2 (TWO) ratcheting tie downs to the rear passenger pegs and tighen down. The idea is to not only compress the suspension, but keep that tension on the bike in a foward pull.....into the wheel chock. I never tie down at the front anymore since buying the Baxley........it just isn't necessary. Oh, and if you stop overnight on your trip, loosen the tie downs so that the bike's suspension isn't compressed for a long period of time. Best bet is to completely remove one of the tie downs and lay it in the driver's seat or on your steering wheel so that you DON'T forget to tighten them back down in the morning when you are ready to travel again.
 

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Model WC650: http://www.pingelonline.com/wheel_chock_removable.htm

I have two of these mounted in my trailer and set up the floor mounted D-Rings in the trailer as advised by Pingel. I have never had an issue hauling two bikes and all of the trackday gear, tool and generator from Syracuse, NY to VIR, NJMP, Calabogie, Mosport or Mid-Ohio. I also use ratchet straps.

http://www.pingelonline.com/e-track_placement_diagram.htm I also mounted the D-Rings parallel with the wheel chock and the rear D-rings are mounted just forward of where your rear footpegs are so when you strap the rear down, it is pulling the bike forward into the wheel chock.

Nothing has ever moved
 

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There is NO "E" in Ridiculous...I can't stand seeing it anymore.
Love your signature, man. I can't stand hearing it anymore. Rediculous this rediculous that. The root word is RIDICULE! RIDICULOUS!

...

Sorry winsa12... I use a wheel chock and a strap from each bar grip to the trailer. For the long trip I would just add a few more straps in case one fails.
 

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If there are no D-rings on the trailer floor then buy some at home depot. Also pick up either a canyon dancer or cycle cinch to hold down the front end. You can get a cheap wheel chock online for like $20 but if you dont want to do that then make your own out of 2x4's. I had to do that once in a pinch and it worked fine. Just screw down two 2x4's slightly wider than the width of the front tire. Then put another piece of 2x4 across the top of the 2 peices that you just put down towards the front so it makes a "U". and roll the bike into the groove. Once you see what kind of clearance you have near the rotors consider stacking another 2x4 on the top/sides. Seems like you have plenty of time though so just buy a wheel chock for $20 on denniskirk.com.
The baxley wheel chock or any other high end chock is great but if you dont plan on using it more than once then I think its a waste of money.
 

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I've trailered my bike from Colorado to Maryland and back a few times with a Harbor Freight 8x4 trailer. I'd get a decent wheel chock and some Canyon Dancers. Also be sure to strap the back tire down so it doesn't move or hop around. I've had no issues in my moves. Just be sure to monitor the straps and make adjustments whenever you stop.

Also, since you're moving to Colorado, check out cosportbikeclub.org. Lot of good people on that board. Might actually get to ride with you at some point since I'm just an hour away in Fort Collins.
 

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just ride it....


id get a trailer with D-rings and strap her down..and then put 2X4's screwed down to the floor in front of the front tire and one behind the rear. And avoid potholes
 

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Welcome to the Mountain states.
I am also on cosportbikeclub (new member) but I am just outside Denver in Highlands Ranch. Hope to see you soon in the warmer weather.
 
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