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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

Perhaps this issue is simply the way a 600RR works, but I'm curious about the following;

Whenever I turn the throttle or release it, the bike reacts in quite a nervous manner. I mean... when opening the throttle it 'thumps' a bit forward, and when releasing it starts slowing down quite instantly.

I understand my bike is a supersport, but I find these instant and immediate 'snugs' quite annoying.

Some observations:
- the phenomenon gets slightly less when the bike is warm
- this only occurs when driving in first or second gear... not so much or not at all in higher gears

My question to you really;
Is there any way I can alter this... if even a little ?!
 

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as long as the acceleration itself is smooth, which it should be, your bike should be fine throttle response wise. when you let off the gas, there is instant engine braking... thats normal. There is also some slack in the chain that makes some jerkiness happen when you transition from accelerationg to decelerating and vice versa. thats also normal
 

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Discussion Starter #5
hi Shortstack05,

thanks for the insights.

It really feels as though the bike 'catches' something and jolts a bit forward when pulling the gas (no matter how far, slightly is enough). Not an awful amount, but enough to be annoying.

When releasing, the bike starts braking immediately. As said before; this only happens in the 2 lowest gears. I guess this is fairly normal too.

I used to have a moped which had the same issue (accelerating), and there it was indeed a loose chain which kept yanking the sprockets.
 

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oh yeah, i def agree that its the chain. i was just mentioning other ways to adjust after you do the chain. 1st and 2nd gear are always ruff.
 

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(be careful i'm a nubby)

I can feel the same thing.....

chain slack is a factor, and the surge or snap, is more pronounced @ low rpm.

this is teaching you throttle/rpm/clutch control-which on these bikes is critical.

I really try to work on smooth inputs for this problem.

i can minimise snap if iam really careful about rolling throttle open/closed.

(really precise/slow control over the 1st-last 1-5mm of roll)

i also will feather the clutch a tiny bit when i get into a surge/snap situation.

brit bike mags (pb, fb) say that a pc v helps smooth out "abrupt fuelling/throttle response "
 

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Discussion Starter #8
'flexible sprockets' would also help ;).

don't know if these even exist.
You know, sprockets that give a bit when they're yanked!
 

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Your rear sprocket is flexible to an extent. There are rubber inserts that fit between the sprocket hub and the wheel to provide a bit of a cushion. If these rubber pieces are worn the bike will react in this manner as well.
 

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You can't adjust all the slack out of the throttle cables... and you can't adjust all the slack out of the chain... So no matter what... you're going to have to learn to ride with the slack. It takes time and I still jerk the bike every now and then.
 

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Your rear sprocket is flexible to an extent. There are rubber inserts that fit between the sprocket hub and the wheel to provide a bit of a cushion. If these rubber pieces are worn the bike will react in this manner as well.
A month late, but this part is called a "Cush Drive" it's inside the hub on the back of the sprocket carrier. If you have an early model, that is most likely the source of the jerking.
 

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in 1st and 2nd sounds pretty norm, esp in 1st i think it might because the trans puts out more torque with the shortest gear ? could be wrong
 
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