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Hey guys, new to this whole motorcycle thing. Just looking for a little input.

I have done my MSF and have a Hyosung 250R which I have put about 1000 miles on. The bike isn't too bad, but it does feel a bit cheap. I am generally accustomed to slightly nicer/higher quality mechanical toys, so there are a lot of things which I notice which just kind of bug me.

I want to pull the trigger on a CBR 600RR, but I am unsure what indicators I should be looking for as to when I am actually ready for this bike.

I consider myself a very responsible person. I am 28, have a wife and son, own my own software company, etc, etc... basically I have a lot to lose and nothing to be gained by doing stupid ****.

The hyosung is a big/heavy bike for a 250... 400lb wet, so I think I am already pretty comfortable with the size of a bigger bike. Anyone have any tips on when it's a good time to upgrade to a bigger bike?

thanks for your input.
Geoff
 
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There will be a lot of varying opinions here...I suggest you follow with me in putting on our flame suits, lol.

If you're level headed enough, there wouldn't be much of a problem with going for a 600RR. As you said, you have a lot to lose, and to me, it seems like you wouldn't have a problem on the street with the bike because of that. As long as you respect the bike, gear up, remain level headed, and always are aware of what can happen, I say go for it.
 

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sounds like your already sensable enough, all it takes is some self control! any bike can hurt you! remember a bike only goes as fast as you turn the throttle! get the 6 and ride safe!!!
 

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*zip* suited up.

i agree that you can probably handle the RR on the street, but i always encourage new riders to, with whichever bike they own, to be able to ride it to it's full potential before moving up. The RR is a whole 'nother beast from those 250's.

I would make sure that you are very adept at cornering, high-speed stops, and other things you pick up just from experience; how to read other riders, cars, etc.

That's my 2cents. Whatever you do ride safe! :)
 

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Anyone can ride a 600 -- that isn't the point. The point of learning on a 250 is that keyword exactly: learning. You can master so many skills on a smaller bike, and if the bitch gets layed down, who gives a ****? It's a cheap 250.

Learn how to ride the hell out of that bike before you lay down a pristine CBR.
 

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In a thousand miles you more than likely have NOT mastered how to modulate the throttle, use the appropriate amount of force on the front brakes in a multitude of situations, learn how to deal with being able to scrub off speed in a decreasing angle turn without freaking out grabbing tons of front or rear brake.

Put around 8-9k and then think about it.
Also the whole "respect" the bike thing is retarded because when you have a death grip on the throttle and are leaning, hit a bump and rev that thing up idgaf how much you "respect" it you're going to regret it.
 

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i say do what ur lil heart desires. i was always used to spoiling myself in life and tried to fool myself by getting an 85 ninja 600r, well a month later i was @the dealership picking up my 1000RR, no msf course either. better yet you should ask someone who knows u personally. my wife actually gave me a ride to pick up my 1k...she knew that i was responsible enough and good enough a rider to handle it. it's too hard to get the best answer for YOU on a forum. i've ridden with ppl that take over a year to get up to speed on a bike, and there are others that learn over a month or so.
 

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i say do what ur lil heart desires. i was always used to spoiling myself in life and tried to fool myself by getting an 85 ninja 600r, well a month later i was @the dealership picking up my 1000RR, no msf course either. better yet you should ask someone who knows u personally. my wife actually gave me a ride to pick up my 1k...she knew that i was responsible enough and good enough a rider to handle it. it's too hard to get the best answer for YOU on a forum. i've ridden with ppl that take over a year to get up to speed on a bike, and there are others that learn over a month or so.
yeah, after a month on that '85 your wife knew you were a knee draggin' monster!
 

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I think it depends on the person. I saw some people taking the MSF class that shouldn't ride a 250. I had the same question when I first decided to get a bike. People on line would always say to start with a 250. I think for most people this is true, but not for everyone. All my friends started on 600's. They had no problems. They told me that I would not be happy with a 250. I rode a 250 at the MSF and I rode my friends Ninja 250 and they were right. It just depends on the person. If your smart, coordinated, mature, safe, and take your time and practice, I personally don't see any problem. Only you can be the judge of that though. There will be a lot of people that will tell you otherwise. My first bike will be a 600rr. I am getting it next week. My friends and I are going to a huge empty parking lot to practice. I've ridden bikes before, but never owned one. Try and find someone who already rides to help you. Good luck.
 

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Any one can ride a 600. Cut the respect the bike, mature, level headed ****.

It's about how well you can ride the bike and how well you utilize the bike to the full extent of what it was built to. Being mature and level headed isn't going to stop you from grabbing a hand-full of brake or slipping and grabbing a handful of throttle.

The advice coming from people giving the old "you sound mature enough" line are those who started big and take 10x longer to learn.
 

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Any one can ride a 600. Cut the respect the bike, mature, level headed ****.

It's about how well you can ride the bike and how well you utilize the bike to the full extent of what it was built to. Being mature and level headed isn't going to stop you from grabbing a hand-full of brake or slipping and grabbing a handful of throttle.

The advice coming from people giving the old "you sound mature enough" line are those who started big and take 10x longer to learn.
Exactly. Thats why when I had my 250 I would be taking just normal curves on roads at 10mph faster than some n00b on a 600 because they are to busy "respecting" aka fearing the bike to actually use it.

You can start on a zx-14 but the fact remains 99% of you will be worse riders than someone who started on say a 500.

The europeans don't have a boat load of 250/500s for nothing.
 

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hey i believe you have a smart head on your shoulders and since youve got a little bit of riding under your belt you are better off than most that just hop on a 600 as first bike. you will probably be ok just dont do nothing crazy/stupid and youll be fine. go ahead take the plunge and get that dream bike, i know i did and never looked back. but i also havent even gone into 10krpms yet either cause im scared and respect the bike or well there is just no need to go that fast on the street. sure youve done stupid **** in the past and learned the hard way so GL and go get that bike!!!
 

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It sounds to me like you have a good foundation going, step up! :)

~~ Watch the throttle response. That is my concern, a bike like the 600RR is to be respected or it will teach ya the hard way ;)

But, you'll have better handling (safer) better braking (safer) and power to get out of trouble (safer).
 

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I too only rode 1100miles (on a 650 however), before upgrading to the 600RR

Honestly I prob should have logged more time on the 650, but its sloppy forks and nose that dove hard under hard braking really didnt inspire confidence. It would get really unsettled even with a moderate hard stop. I'm hitting the track in september so I wanted something that could hand hard stops without getting all bent out of shape

the 600RR certainly was a night and day difference in terms of power delivery, but also in terms of chassis feel, turn in, and braking

As soon as I got on it, I felt at home, and within the first block of test riding it, I felt confident. It really is super stable as all the mags say, but you gotta respect that and still master the throttle such that you keep your entry speeds in check
 

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You can get in trouble on any bike, but it seems to happen a little quicker when there's more than 100 HP behind you on a 600. My advice is when you're no longer having to think about the controls of the bike and are able to focus purely on traffic, then you're ready for a step up.

PS. It's your life, you know what you're capable of.
 

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Anyone can ride a 600 -- that isn't the point. The point of learning on a 250 is that keyword exactly: learning. You can master so many skills on a smaller bike, and if the bitch gets layed down, who gives a ****? It's a cheap 250.

Learn how to ride the hell out of that bike before you lay down a pristine CBR.
I like this response the most. Use the 250 to learn. Do it until you know how to ride the hell out of it. Once you do the transition to a 600 will be a lot safer AND more satisfying than it would be right now.
 

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I understand the allure of having a new bike that is a pride to own, especially since that was the main reason I upgraded from my 2nd bike (a used F3) to my 600rr (new). Even though you may consider your 250 a POS, just remember: you already own it. Ride it as much as possible and continue to learn. Try a track day and refine the basics with your current bike.

Trust me, after riding for over 8 years and several track days, only now do I realize how little skill/experience I had at 1,000 or 3,000 miles.
 

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It depends on what you want to do. If you leave your ego and ride defensively, you will be fine on a 600rr. Remember, be a 600rr or a Hayabusa, none of them ride themselves. Its always the rider's responsibility. Regarding learning, I will suggest to master your skills a little bit more on your 250 and get a 600rr after that. If you can afford you can get your 600rr now and ride it in weekends while make the 250 your commute bike.

PS: I also own a software company and I ride my 600rr to office. It adds to your geekiness...
 
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