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Discussion Starter #1
I'm posting this in the section because I'm sure others have wondered why new tires make their bike feel like it doesn't have the same power that it had previously. I just recently went from the stock qualifiers to the Michelin Power Pures. The bike doesn't want to come up as easy as if it has less power. Now I wonder if that's from the extra weight that I added with have more meat on the tires as compared to my old ones that were worn out or does it have to do with my chain being a little bit tighter now. I'm leaning toward the extra weight the rubber added.
 

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ummm the pures are supposed to be one of the lightest tires out there. maybe its the chain and its tightness. ive never noticed what you are talking about before. im on my 7-8-9th set of tires.
 

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Yes you should notice a slight difference, (i know I do, especially going from a worn out 180/55 to a new 190/55)

There are two reasons:

1 since the old tire was worn down it had a smaller circumference, meaning less distance per rotation = the feeling of more power, similar to increasing the number of teeth on the rear sprocket

2 also since the tire is worn down it has less rotational mass which also translates to better accelleration and the feeling of more power
 

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I'm posting this in the section because I'm sure others have wondered why new tires make their bike feel like it doesn't have the same power that it had previously. I just recently went from the stock qualifiers to the Michelin Power Pures. The bike doesn't want to come up as easy as if it has less power. Now I wonder if that's from the extra weight that I added with have more meat on the tires as compared to my old ones that were worn out or does it have to do with my chain being a little bit tighter now. I'm leaning toward the extra weight the rubber added.
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definitely, not the tires.
The PURES are on avg. 1.5 - 2.0 Lbs lighter.
If anything you would feel more acceleration, like most other riders who have switched to Pure.

Sounds like what he said. You may have your chain too tight.

ALSO Check to make sure your rotor/Calipers are aligned up correctly.

If your have drag on your rotors that could also explain it.


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Discussion Starter #5
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definitely, not the tires.
The PURES are on avg. 1.5 - 2.0 Lbs lighter.
If anything you would feel more acceleration, like most other riders who have switched to Pure.

Sounds like what he said. You may have your chain too tight.

ALSO Check to make sure your rotor/Calipers are aligned up correctly.

If your have drag on your rotors that could also explain it.


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The chain is dead on with the slack adjustment. It was slightly loose before the tires. I know the tires are lighter than other comparable tires such as the Qualifier 2 but what about compared to a worn out oem Qualifier? Just curious. The calipers sound like a good theory. I'll get her up on the stands in a few mins and see what they are like.
 

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Yes you should notice a slight difference, (i know I do, especially going from a worn out 180/55 to a new 190/55)

There are two reasons:

1 since the old tire was worn down it had a smaller circumference, meaning less distance per rotation = the feeling of more power, similar to increasing the number of teeth on the rear sprocket

2 also since the tire is worn down it has less rotational mass which also translates to better accelleration and the feeling of more power
ive never noticed this. i wear my tires ut faster on the sides then i do the center. but still have never felt the differnce when i change them. maybe cause when i get new tires, i ride like a bat out of hell.
 

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ive never noticed this. i wear my tires ut faster on the sides then i do the center. but still have never felt the differnce when i change them. maybe cause when i get new tires, i ride like a bat out of hell.

:+1:

Never noticed it. I don't even notice a difference with track tires, as far as power is concerned.
 

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Who knows. I would think if there was a difference it would be so slight that you wouldn't notice it. But maybe some people have better sensory abilities(?).
 

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Discussion Starter #11
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Placibo effect.?

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I don't think its placibo effect. Because I expected them to make the bike a little quicker since they market their weight so much. Wheels rotate freely which means the rotors are flowing through the calipers fine. I'm thinking it was because the chain had more slack in it, it would jerk on the sprockets much more harshly.
 

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I don't think its placibo effect. Because I expected them to make the bike a little quicker since they market their weight so much. Wheels rotate freely which means the rotors are flowing through the calipers fine. I'm thinking it was because the chain had more slack in it, it would jerk on the sprockets much more harshly.

either way, its not possible for a tire to cause a power loss, and lets be real, the amount of weight we are talking between a worn tire, and a new, a q2 vs pure, is hardly going to be noticable, atlesat by a seat dyno
 

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In my personal experience I feel a little "drag" if the tire pressure is too low.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
either way, its not possible for a tire to cause a power loss, and lets be real, the amount of weight we are talking between a worn tire, and a new, a q2 vs pure, is hardly going to be noticable, atlesat by a seat dyno
If thats the case then Michelin's whole campaign about their tires being lighter is a wash. I believe you 100%. Its just something isn't the same as the bike was before. My money's on the chain being back to its correct tightness.
 

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^ I think that with the loss in rotating mass and loss in circumference on worn tire in comparison to a new tire, there is a "slightly" notacible difference in the feeling of torque delivery

I bet a warn out rear tire is about a pound or more lighter then a new rear tire - plus the rotational mass is at the furthest part from the axle, which compounds the further away it gets.

I definitly felt a difference when I switched from a worn out 180 to a new 190
 

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^ it is a good point but most people will tell you you can't tell the difference between a 180 and 190.

my most recent tire change (a few weeks ago) was from completely worn 180 BT016's to brand new 180 Dunlop Q2's and I still felt a bit of a difference... it is noticable harder to power up the front tire in 2nd gear... can I feel a difference in accelleration? No - but I can feel that slight decrease in torque

am I a power wheelie stunting squid? hell no. just saying
 

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am I a power wheelie stunting squid? hell no. just saying
Lol! There's nothing wrong with wheelies as long as you aren't being a danger to someone else. Risking yourself and your property is fine with me. I do wheelies too occasionally. They're too much fun to resist sometimes.

Either way, I don't completely disagree with you guys, because there IS a physics principle there.

I think it acts on the bike differently, but that it doesn't actually change anything. By that I mean, it may feel like it has less power, but it actually doesn't, and the numbers may actually even be different, but those numbers are just conditional anyway.
 

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If thats the case then Michelin's whole campaign about their tires being lighter is a wash. I believe you 100%. Its just something isn't the same as the bike was before. My money's on the chain being back to its correct tightness.
oh, there is a difference, yes, it should allow for better acceleration

but in the case of say, wheelies, not so much as its a function of lifting the bike, not rotating the wheel, this is how a wheelie works, obviously

the bigger difference is when trying to change the lean angle of the tire (ie: fighting gyroscopic forces) where the pures lighter weight

but all that being said, the acceleration factor is a mild improvement
 

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Lol! There's nothing wrong with wheelies as long as you aren't being a danger to someone else. Risking yourself and your property is fine with me. I do wheelies too occasionally. They're too much fun to resist sometimes.

Either way, I don't completely disagree with you guys, because there IS a physics principle there.

I think it acts on the bike differently, but that it doesn't actually change anything. By that I mean, it may feel like it has less power, but it actually doesn't, and the numbers may actually even be different, but those numbers are just conditional anyway.
<<<<<<<<<<doesnt know how to wheelie>>>>>>>>>> :retard:
 
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