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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone,

I've been on 125 & 250 dirt bikes close to 2 dozen times. Never had any clutch/throttle control issues, braking issues in dirt or sand, yadda yadda yadda.... Not an experienced rider by ANY means, but I do have a general idea of how to NOT hurt myself on a 250 dirt bike.

As for street bikes, I haven't a clue how much translates over. I've recently began my search for a bike.

No financing. I've considered the 250 route, but there are plenty of 250's around here for sale and I haven't seen them move. I'm afraid to spend my money and be stuck with a bike for much longer than I want and then lose several hundred or even a grand on the deal just to move it. My buddy has a 250 for 1,000 less than book value here and the dealers have a few and they aren't selling - I guess the economy is hurting worse than I thought locally. General consensus from the internet seems that a 250 is the best place to start....

I've been eye balling a new 600RR Phoenix, got a price quote from the dealer out the door and it's within my budget with enough $$ to spare on full safety gear.

I've already signed up for an August course with MSF, I would like to have a bike of my own BEFORE then, but I do not plan to test ride or even begin to learn to ride without taking the course. Yes, I may have a brand new bike in my garage and not ride it for several weeks until I take the course. My buddy has been riding for a long time and said I will be comfortable on the CBR.

I have a car with 400+hp right now, and I am fully aware of the consequences I face with poor judgement on the road, especially with so much power. I can say I am a safe & responsible driver & only use the car to it's capability at the drag strip. I am great with resisting temptation. I was the typical ignorant driver at first but I have been 5+ years without doing anything stupid on the road & having any citations. I grew up! :five:

Several long time riders locally have said to take the MSF course, learn the proper braking & turning techniques, along with becoming completely comfortable with the bike in the event of needing to perform any evasive action. I would solely take their advice, but they may possibly be excited at the idea of a new person riding in the group, so I'd like an unbiased (to my knowledge) outside opinion.

I have some experience on dirt bikes, 125 & 250 like previously stated. I was able to control the clutch/throttle & shift with ease, turning & braking, also riding at a quick pace on narrow trails with life changing trees surrounding me. My question is, passing a MSF course - would it be ignorant to jump straight to a 600rr?

I'm not looking for speed, wheelies, etc. I'm looking for a bike that catches my eye, I'll enjoy getting suited up and going for a long ride with my buddies or even solo.

I have already made a plan mapping out how I plan to ride.

I will attend the MSF course & I'm confident I will pass.

I will begin riding my own bike within my neighborhood after the MSF course. It is full of long roads, steep inclines, sweeping turns, narrow turns and a very large parking lot that is not occupied and I could set up cones or other obstacles to practice. Ideally I would like to mimic what I went through at MSF. The person I spoke to on the phone said when I come for my classes, they will give me directions on setting up a practice course in the parking lot I can use.

I live in a low traffic area and after a MINIMUM of 2 weeks of practice in my neighborhood & parking lot will I even consider putting myself out with traffic. I plan riding EARLY morning where traffic will be even more sparse than it already is, when I am ready to make the jump. I have buddies committed to riding with me at this time to help show me how to manage pressure from traffic.

Sorry for the long winded post, but I am thinking this through and trying to do this in the best possible way suited for me and would greatly appreciate friendly opinions on my plans.

Thanks ahead of time!!
 

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Go for it. If its the bike you want and makes you happy then why not. There will be a lot of people saying "don't get the RR for your first bike" .... keep a level head and you will be fine. Im gonna get ragged on for this post............
 

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no, it is perfectly fine to start on a 600. same thing i did and havent had any problems with it. it sounds like you are taking it even more conservatively than i did. after my riding course and 5 mins in a parking lot, i felt comfortable enough to take it to the streets. two weeks is going to seem like an eternity. it is a good idea to ride with an experienced rider for a little while to help you out with everything that you need to pay attention to while riding and such. good luck and hope you get one.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Everyone should know that I'm not really interested in the performance aspects of a bike just yet. You can liken it to that of the 65 year old man in the shiny new C6 Corvette. It's going to be a fun cruiser to take a joy ride in for the time being.

Trust me, I have NO desire to mangle myself. I have too much to live for & too much to look forward to every day.

Don't let me kid you, at some point I will want to see what the bike is capable of, but it'll be at a track event. I know a few people who are buried because of irresponsibility on bikes.
 

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a 600rr is an easy bike to start on. The power is smooth, and you dont have to worry about it flipping over on you unless you are pinning the gas back off the line. I think my 07 is easier to ride than my dirtbike. Just make sure to take it easy on it for a while.... and invest in a pair of good frame sliders.
 

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If you can respect the machine, and take the time to master it you should be fine. It's definitely not optimal... but very doable if you intend to ride responsibly.

I rode a lot of dirt bikes/quads when I was younger and the 600rr was my first bike... I managed fairly well. But I definitely understand why it would be better to start on a 250. If I was to do it again, I'd probably start on a 250 also.

As for whether or not things port over from dirt bikes... some things like clutch/shifting, balance... etc, do port over but many things are new/different. There are WAY more things to pay attention to (traffic, signals, road conditions, tires warm... etc) which requires you to be far more vigilant if you want to stay alive. You can't slack off/relax like you can in a car... the moment you get distracted is the moment that someone's going to cut you off or stop quicker than you expected etc and you panic. Panic + high performance brakes = trouble.

Although I rode motorcycles when I was younger, I think the best asset/skill that I brought to the bike was good defensive driving skills/habits from the cage.
 

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my first bike is my 600rr.. There are gonna be people that tell you you're makin a mistake and they could be right! Take the MSF course and after you pass keep practicing those slow maneuvers, braking and turns that will help you in real situations.. Know the consequences of your actions and you will be ok.
 

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It should be ok. You seem to know what you are doing. I started the same way with you. After passing the msf i got the cbr600rr. But I would get a used bike not a new one because you save money when you drop it since you are starting to learn to ride. and also you can get an awesome gear and parts for the bike.

What i did was i rode only at night for a couple of day just to get used to the bike handling. then you can start during the day.
 

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I've ridden MX for a good part of my life, and the street is completely different. As said, pretty much all that carries over is shifting/clutch work/braking.

With that being said, I have no idea about the 600rr question, as I'm actually on a cruiser right now, learning the basics of the street before I hop on a cbr, but I would say if you have the basic knowledge of a bike, a 600 shouldn't be a problem as long as you ride smart.
 

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Dude, sounds like you have the right mindset. The 600rr is only not recommended for those unable to handle the responsibility and don't respect what that bike can do. If you're comfortable with the idea of a 600rr then get it man! The bike is simply amazing...
 

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Dude, sounds like you have the right mindset. The 600rr is only not recommended for those unable to handle the responsibility and don't respect what that bike can do. If you're comfortable with the idea of a 600rr then get it man! The bike is simply amazing...
I agree with this.
 

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It's not a good idea. It's a bad idea, the opposite of a good idea. A good idea would be to get a well-used smaller bike and ride it for a few months. Then sell it for what you paid for it and buy a CBR.

But you know that already. Your "question" was not a question at all. It was actually a simple plea to have someone validate your less-than-smart plan. It worked. Have fun on your new bike.

OK, I can't resist a few more comments. First, in the history of the internet, no one has ever said,"hey, I'm an immature nitwit. Should I start on a supersport?" Everyone who has ever asked this question has described themselves as "mature and level-headed" and has promised they will "respect the bike." Most of those mature level-headed folks go on to toss their bikes down the street.

Hey, one more thing. My little brother wants to learn to drive. He took my Camry around the block last week and he did really well. Do you mind if he borrows your 400+ hp drag car to learn in? He's mature and level headed. I think he'll be fine. What do you mean, no? Why not?
 

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I started on a 600 as well. People are right, it's not that big of a deal if you stay within your limits. The bike is pretty docile if you keep it under 6k RPMs. It's only when you get to 8-10k RPMs where you feel how fast it really is.

The one thing is don't buy a new bike. You don't know if you will like it, and there's a decent chance you will drop it in a parking lot somewhere. If you don't really like it, you will take at least a 2-3k hit from depreciation if you try to sell it. If you buy used you can get a bike that someone already has dropped, so when you drop it or if someone knocks it over in the parking lot it doesn't really cost you anything (see if you can pick out the voice of experience here).

Basically if you shop around on craigslist it will be easy as hell to get a good deal. I got my 06 with 3400 miles a couple months back for $4500 because it had minor damage from a slow low sider.
 

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I would always say it's okay to start on a 600.

BUT

Then my buddy bought a crappy 250cc China bike to learn on for like $300. You would not believe how hard of a time he had just balancing. Turns out he never even rode a bicycle in his life. It's so scary trying to teach him in a parking lot.
 

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You seem mature and you have dirt bike experience, two great things to have under your belt before jumping on the 600RR. Take it easy and get to know the bike before trying things and you should be good to go. MSF course is always a plus and everyone learns something. I never took one but after 20 years of motorcycle street riding I'm gonna take one finally! You see, we all have a tendency to pick up bad habits if not trained properly from the start. That's true about a lot of things in life. I know I have a few things to learn still myself. Post up pics of your bike when you get it! WELCOME to the forum!!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
It's not a good idea. It's a bad idea, the opposite of a good idea. A good idea would be to get a well-used smaller bike and ride it for a few months. Then sell it for what you paid for it and buy a CBR.

But you know that already. Your "question" was not a question at all. It was actually a simple plea to have someone validate your less-than-smart plan. It worked. Have fun on your new bike.

OK, I can't resist a few more comments. First, in the history of the internet, no one has ever said,"hey, I'm an immature nitwit. Should I start on a supersport?" Everyone who has ever asked this question has described themselves as "mature and level-headed" and has promised they will "respect the bike." Most of those mature level-headed folks go on to toss their bikes down the street.

Hey, one more thing. My little brother wants to learn to drive. He took my Camry around the block last week and he did really well. Do you mind if he borrows your 400+ hp drag car to learn in? He's mature and level headed. I think he'll be fine. What do you mean, no? Why not?
You are entitled to feel that way Jim. I'm not looking for someone to validate my less than smart plan, what I'm looking for is help. Every experienced local rider I've spoken to, including some friends have said with having some experience on dirt bike, that I would be okay learning on a 600rr - but I was unsure if they were excited at the idea of a another rider joining them soon. I wanted fair, unbiased opinions (to the best of my knowledge) from an outside source that could really care less if I ever ride or not, so 600rr.net seemed like the perfect place to go and ask.

I'm confident in my ability to be a responsible rider on a serious piece of equipment. I have a 400hp+ car that is on the edge of control whenever you touch the throttle, I know and understand the consequences of my actions so I never push the car on the street. Tree's, telephone poles, other cars & the police hurt and could change my life in ways that I wouldn't like.

My main problem with buying a 250, I've been looking into this for 6 months now - I've found several 250's for sale in early February, since then I've found only one is sold. The dealers in my area have decreased their stock (I was there this week inquiring about the bike and we chatted a bit). I'm afraid to acquire a 250, pay sales tax, ride it for a bit & then try to sell it and be stuck with it like the three 250's I see for sale just a few miles from my home. There just isn't a market for the 250's in my area from what I've seen. This is why 6 months later, I still don't have a bike at all.

Would I let a new driver learn to drive on my car? If they are responsible and mature, can resist the temptation to burn through the tires & make high speed runs, sure I wouldn't have any qualms with it. But there are very few people who are capable of doing this, I personally have 1 person in my life that I know could take the car & not do something stupid in it, because they respect it, they understand the consequences of their actions & they value their health.

Jim, while the vast majority may be immature & stupid, not everyone falls into that category. I've made mistakes previously that have had long lasting ramifications and 8 years later I'm in control.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Ironic you say that Jim, that was what I was looking at before I wandered over to the new bikes...

If I could get on both bikes in a parking lot and see how they feel and how I feel on them compared to the dirt bike, I could make a decision - then take my MSF course and practice on my own.

Could you elaborate on what you mean by ridiculous? Trying to understand what about the 600rr that could bite me hard while practicing to ride in my neighboorhood & in the parking lot?
 

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Could you elaborate on what you mean by ridiculous? Trying to understand what about the 600rr that could bite me hard while practicing to ride in my neighboorhood & in the parking lot?
Sure. The CBR is an out-of-the-box race bike, for all intents and purposes. It will do a quarter mile in about a 10.5. The throttle and brakes are extremely sensitive. You are a noob. Nothing personal, but it's true. You'll be hanging on for dear life, and overcontrolling the **** out of the bike, even in your 'hood. You'll hit a little bump, your death-grip will jerk the throttle open, and you'll wrap it around a stop sign, or toss it into an intersection, or ram it into a Buick.

Now, you're gonna do all the same stuff on a 250 or an SV-650, but you have a much better chance of getting it back under control since those bikes aren't quite so finicky.

Check Cragislist and Cycletrader.com. I'll guarantee you can find a used SV-650 under $3K.
 
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